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Xavier University Is Now Home to America’s First Pizza ATM

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If your need for pizza is real (and we know it is), then your willingness to wait for said pizza is probably pretty limited. Thankfully, there’s finally a way to get hot, fresh pie immediately—but you have to get into college first. Specifically Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

This fall, the school’s 6600 hungry attendees will get to enjoy the first ever “pizza ATM” in the United States. As Vocativ reports, the machine will live in Fenwick Place residence hall and serve up pizzas on demand, with cheese, pepperoni, or veggie toppings. A medium, 12-inch pie costs $9, which is a pretty sweet price to pay for not having to leave the premises or change out of your pajama pants (not that the undergrads were gonna do that anyway).

We know what you’re thinking: How good could ATM pizza really be, though? Well, according to Xavier’s auxiliary services marketing director, Jennifer Paiotti, pretty darn good. She told WCPO-TV: “It’s the best pizza I’ve ever had, and I hate to admit that as a New Yorker.”

Time, and the discerning palates of young adults in the middle of the night, will tell. The magical, mystical pizza machine is made by Paline—you can get one for yourself for just $55,000—and has features like a touchscreen, webcam, and text/email alert system so you can stay in close contact with your food like you’ve always wanted. It can hold 70 pies at a time.

If you’ve picked up on the distinction that the ATM is the first in the U.S., sadly it’s true: Similar delicious dispensers have existed in Europe for years. Better late than never, America.

The very first pizza from the new #pizzaatm! #paline

A photo posted by Pizza ATM (@pizzaatm) on


[h/t Vocativ]

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The Simple Way to Reheat Your French Fries and Not Have Them Turn Into a Soggy Mess
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Some restaurant dishes are made to be doggy-bagged and reheated in the microwave the next day. Not French fries: The more crispy and delectable they are when they first arrive on your table, the more of a soggy disappointment they’ll be when you try to revive them at home. But as The Kitchn recently shared, there’s a secret to making leftover fries you’ll actually enjoy eating.

The key is to avoid the microwave altogether. Much of the appeal of fries comes from their crunchy, golden-brown exterior and their creamy potato center. This texture contrast is achieved by deep-frying, and all it takes is a few rotations around a microwave to melt it away. As the fries heat up, they create moisture, transforming all those lovely crispy parts into a flabby mess.

If you want your fries to maintain their crunch, you need to recreate the conditions they were cooked in initially. Set a large pan filled with about 2 tablespoons of oil for every 1 cup of fries you want to cook over medium-high heat. When you see the oil start to shimmer, add the fries in a single layer. After about a minute, flip them over and allow them to cook for half a minute to a minute longer.

By heating up fries with oil in a skillet, you produce something called the Maillard Reaction: This happens when high heat transforms proteins and sugars in food, creating the browning effect that gives fried foods their sought-after color, texture, and taste.

After your fries are nice and crisp, pull them out of the pan with tongs or a spatula, set them on a paper towel to absorb excess oil, and sprinkle them with salt. Now all you need is a perfect burger to feel like you’re eating a restaurant-quality meal at home.

[h/t The Kitchn]

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toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
Meet Japan's Original (Not-so-Fresh) Form of Sushi, 'Funazushi'
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)
toyohara, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0 (cropped)

When it comes to sushi, fresh is usually best. Most of the sushi we eat in America is haya-nare, which involves raw seafood and vinegared rice. But in Japan, there's an older form of sushi—said to be the original form—called funazushi. It's made from fermented carp sourced from one particular place, Lake Biwa, and takes about three years to produce from start to finish. The salt it's cured with keeps the bad bacteria at bay, and the result is said to taste like a fish version of prosciutto. Great Big Story recently caught up with Mariko Kitamura, the 18th generation to run her family’s shop in Takashima City, where she's one of the very few people left producing funazushi. You can learn more about the process behind the delicacy, and about Kitamura, in the video below.

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