20 Successful Kickstarter Products You Can Buy on Amazon

Two purple PyroPet candles, one in the process of burning down
Two purple PyroPet candles, one in the process of burning down

Kickstarter is a great tool to help new businesses get their products developed. Thanks to the magic of crowdsourcing, the demand is available before there is even a supply. In case you missed the campaigns, here are some successful Kickstarter products you can buy on Amazon. You can find even more on Amazon Launchpad Kickstarter.

1. Cat Pyropet; $34

Carved candles are nice to look at it, but once you use it for its actual purpose—burning—the candle tends to lose its fun shape. Often people will put off burning a candle altogether for fear of being left with a melted lump where a cat- or tree-shaped candle once stood. PyroPet encourages people to actually use their candles because once the candle melts down, a creepy (but cool) metal skeleton is revealed. PyroPet now sells lots of different animals, but the project all started with a cat candle called Kisa. The campaign more than doubled its $40,000 goal in 2013.

2. Illumibowl Toilet Night Light; $11

When getting up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom, some people are hesitant to turn on the lights. The IllumiBowl Toilet Night Light eliminates the need to hit the light switch by illuminating the toilet itself. The clip-on light makes the toilet bowl glow one of eight colors (or rotates through all of them). It's motion-sensored, so it only flips on when a sleepy visitor comes to use the toilet. The product met its Kickstarter goal in 2014 and also made an appearance on Shark Tank, where software tycoon Kevin O’Leary offered up a whopping $100,000 for 25 percent of the business.

3. Qwerkywriter S Typewriter; $260

Qwerkywriter S Typewriter

This item has the look, feel, and satisfaction of an original typewriter but with the accessibility and ease of your tablet. The Qwerkywriter Typewriter can connect to your computer with or without wires and provides one of the most delightful typing experiences you could imagine. Qwerkywriter raised nearly $130,000 on Kickstarter in 2014.

4. Exploding Kittens; $20

Fans of the popular web comic The Oatmeal are probably familiar with this card game. The party game is good for two to five players and comes with 56 cards, all illustrated by The Oatmeal's Matthew Inman. The game boasts two Kickstarter records, as both the most-backed Kickstarter project ever and the most-funded game in Kickstarter history. Impressively, it raised over $8 million during the course of its campaign. According to CNN, the game is a lot like UNO, but with more deadly kittens.

5. Back To Roots Water Garden; $97

Everyone loves a good self-sustaining ecosystem. The Back to Roots Water Garden is the perfect aquarium for hungry pet owners who hate to clean. The bottom of this fishbowl holds the betta fish, while the top holds a variety of edible plants. The plants clean the fish bowl and the fish's waste is eaten by the plants. All the owner has to do is feed the fish and they're rewarded with flourishing edible plants to enjoy. The project raised over $200,000 in 2012, back when it was called the Home Aquaponics Kit.

6. Collar Perfect Travel Iron; $35

When running to a business meeting or an important interview, a crisp collar is key. Never settle for out-of-shape lapels again with this portable iron that slides onto collars for on-the-go perfection. Best of all, it transforms into a normal iron for when you have other wrinkles to work out. The innovative gadget met its Kickstarter goal in 2014 and has been helping out wrinkled shirts ever since.

7. Good And Cheap Cookbook; $10

Let's be real: When it comes to mealtime, you usually have to decide between eating healthy or eating cheaply. But it's possible to have your avocado toast and eat it, too: Leanne Brown created a recipe book to teach new cooks how to make the most out of their grocery trips. The helpful book includes meals that only cost about $4 to make. You'll never have to settle for McDonald's again! The Good and Cheap book is Kickstarter's most successful cookbook. The PDF is free, but for every hard copy sold, the company donates to someone in need.

8. Sprout Pencils; $19

These helpful pencils have two functions. Besides the obvious role of writing, the pencils can also help you plant a garden. Each writing utensil comes with a little pod on the end filled with seeds. When you're done with the pencil, you can place it into a pot of soil to begin the growing process. The unique pencils got their start after a successful Kickstarter campaign in 2012. The company now makes pencils with a variety of different plants, including sage, sunflower, basil, thyme, and more. You can get either regular number two pencils or colored pencils.

9. ZOMBICIDE: BLACK PLAGUE BOARD GAME; $62

Zombicide: Black Plague is a lot like the original Zombicide board game, but set in medieval times. Both games are cooperative board games with customizable characters and game pieces. Players take on the roles of survivors in a zombie apocalypse as they fight their way through hordes of zombies, collecting weapons, learning spells, and gaining experience along the way. The successful Kickstarter campaign raised more than $4 million.

10. Jamstik Smart Guitar; $200

A young man playing the Jamstik 7 Smart Guitar

JamStik is a great way to learn guitar, thanks to its lack of necessary tuning—not to mention its portability and the accompanying learning app. Simply connect the product to your iPad, iPhone, or laptop via Bluetooth or USB to get started. The product has real strings that make noise through the connected device. It's just 18 inches long, so you can throw it in a backpack for on-the-go learning. An earlier version of the JamStik met its Kickstarter goal in May 2015.

11. Prime Climb Board Game; $28

This colorful board game is perfect for two to four math-loving players. Players must roll the dice, do some quick calculations, and make their way to the center of the board (bumping off opponents as they go). It's fun for people of all math levels, and helps children just learning multiplication and division get a better grasp of the concept. Math lovers supported this project on Kickstarter in 2014.

12. Ilumi Led Smart Bulb; $50

After getting comfortable on the couch or in bed, the last thing you want to do is get up and turn off the light. Ilumi is the perfect solution to these lazy problems: The smart light bulb can be turned on and off or dimmed right from a smartphone or tablet. Simply screw in the device like any other light bulb and then you can change the dimness or color. The LED light is amazingly efficient and can last up to 20 years. The bulb met its goal in 2015.

13. Soviet Bus Stops Book; $16

This quirky coffee table book is filled with the charming, forgotten bus stops in former soviet countries. Author Christopher Herwig spent 12 years traveling through 13 different countries documenting the weird art of bus stops. From interesting fresco paintings, to lopsided statues, these structures are a lot more unique than what you might find in the United States.

14. Chain Mail Bikini: The Anthology Of Women Gamers; $13

It has always been a bit puzzling to see the strange outfits that some female video game characters wear. From boob-shaped armor to chain mail bikinis, these outfits are just plain dangerous. Hazel Newlevant used this oddity as the title for this special anthology. The book contains comics from more than 40 artists about what it's like to be a female gamer or game character, with over 200 pages that explore all types of games from video games to card games. In 2015, the Kickstarter campaign far exceeded its $13,000 goal, earning nearly $70,000.

15. Mudwatt; $29

This living battery is fueled by bacteria. The educational project is perfect for kids who are just getting into science. Simply fill the MudWatt with dirt to get started. The micoorganisms in mud release electrons as they consume and break down sugars; these electrons are then harnessed by the MudWatt battery. Different bacteria produce more power than others, so children can experiment with different kinds of dirt and by adding different ingredients from around the house. Parents looking for fun and easy STEM projects loved this idea and the project was backed in 2015.

16. Wuju Hot Sauce; $9

WUJU is a special hot sauce created by Lawrence Wu. The Drexel-educated foodie has a real passion for hot sauces and worked tirelessly to create a special sauce made with habanero peppers, mango, agave nectar, and an array of spices. Heat-seeking gastronomes who backed this Kickstarter in 2015 were thrilled to have a unique hot sauce that tastes great with almost anything.

17. Eyepatch iPhone Case; $25

If you're worried about people potentially hacking into your phone's camera, a piece of tape over the lens might do the trick. For a more permanent solution, try this special phone case with a slider that covers the lens when you're not using it.

18. Rocketbook Everlast Reusable Smart Notebook; $32

Rocketbook Everlast Reusable Smart Notebook

Everlast promises “a classic pen and paper experience that’s built for the digital age.” This notebook offers 36 reusable pages that transfer what you write by hand to your computer over Google Drive, Dropbox, and more. All it takes to erase a page for another use is a drop of water. With over 28,000 backers, Everlast raised around $1.8 million for their incredible notebooks in 2017.

19. LIFX Smart LED Lightbulb; $40

LIFX Smart LED Light Bulb

Not only does the LIFX LED Lightbulb come with tons of color options, it also can connect to your Alexa, Google Assistant, or Apple Home Kit with ease. With simple setup and easier control from your phone, the LIFX Lightbulb is as intuitive as it is useful. LIFX also joined the 1M+ club on Kickstarter back in 2013, making around $1.3 million dollars.

20. Espro Travel Coffee Press; $32

Espro Travel Coffee Press

For those who are on the go and need a little kick, the Espro Travel Coffee Press presents a stylish, affordable answer to your needs. Perfect for camping or commuting, Espro’s new spin on the thermos quickly surpassed their goal, raising almost $60,000 earlier in 2018.

All photos via Amazon.

A version of this story originally ran in 2016.

15 Facts About the Bill of Rights

iStock.com/LPETTET
iStock.com/LPETTET

December 15 is Bill of Rights Day, so let's celebrate by exploring the amendments that helped shape America.

1. IT OWES A LOT TO MAGNA CARTA.

Magna Carta
The seal of Magna Carta.
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

Some of the sentiments in our bill of rights are at least 800 years old. In 1215, King John of England had a serious uprising on his hands. For many years, discontentment festered among his barons, many of whom loathed the King and his sky-high taxes. On May 17, a rebellious faction led by Robert Fitzwalter captured London, forcing John to negotiate.

Their talks produced one of the most significant legal documents ever written. The King and his barons composed a 63-clause agreement which would—ostensibly—impose certain limits on royal rule. Among these laws, the best-known gave English noblemen the right to a fair trial. They called their groundbreaking peace treaty Magna Carta, or "The Great Charter."

The original version didn't last long, though. John persuaded Pope Innocent III to invalidate the document and, within three months, His Holiness did just that. The next year, King John's 9-year-old son, King Henry III, issued an abridged version of Magna Carta to appease the barons, and in 1225 enforced a new and revised Magna Carta. Today, citizens of the U.K. are protected by three of the 1225 version's clauses, such as the aforementioned right to a trial by jury.

Magna Carta's influence has also extended far beyond Britain. Across the Atlantic, its language flows through the U.S. Constitution. Over half of the articles in America's Bill of Rights are directly or indirectly descended from clauses in said charter. For instance, the Fifth Amendment guarantees that "private property shall not be taken for public use, without just compensation." Article 28 of Magna Carta makes a similar statement about the seizure of "corn or other goods."

2. ANOTHER BIG INFLUENCE WAS THE ENGLISH BILL OF RIGHTS.

An engraving showing the English Bill of Rights being presented to William and Mary (William III of England and Mary II of England), 1689.
An engraving showing the English Bill of Rights being presented to William and Mary (William III of England and Mary II of England), 1689.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Issued in 1689, this Parliamentary Act made several guarantees that were later echoed by the first 10 U.S. constitutional amendments. For instance, the English Bill of Rights forbids "cruel and unusual punishments" while ensuring the "right of the subjects to petition the king."

3. THE U.S. VERSION WAS CHAMPIONED BY AN OFT-IGNORED FOUNDING FATHER.

George Mason
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

There's a decent chance that you've never heard of George Mason. By founding father standards, this Virginian has been largely overlooked. But if it weren't for Mason, the Constitution might have never been given its venerated Bill of Rights.

Back in 1776, Mason was part of a committee that drafted Virginia's Declaration of Rights. "[All] men," the finished product said, "are by nature free and independent, and have certain inherent rights … namely the enjoyment of life and liberty." Sound familiar? It should. As everybody knows, Thomas Jefferson would write another, more famous declaration that year. When he did so, he was heavily influenced by the document Mason spearheaded.

Fast-forward to 1787. With the Constitutional Convention wrapping up in Philadelphia, Mason argued that a bill of inalienable rights should be added. This idea was flatly rejected by the State Delegates. So, in protest, Mason refused to sign the completed Constitution.

4. MASON FOUND AN ALLY IN THE "GERRY" OF "GERRYMANDERING."

portrait of Elbridge Gerry
NYPL, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

At the convention, the motion to include a bill of rights wasn't made by Mason, although he seconded it. Instead, credit belongs to one Elbridge Gerry, who had also withheld his signature from the Constitution. He'd go on to become a notorious figure during his tenure as the governor of Massachusetts. A staunch Democratic-Republican, Gerry was governor during the blatantly partisan re-drawing of the Bay State's congressional districts. These days, we call this unfair political maneuver "gerrymandering."

5. THOMAS JEFFERSON WAS A HUGE PROPONENT …

portrait of Thomas Jefferson
iStock.com/benoitb

The Sage of Monticello sided with Mason. Following the Constitution's approval, Jefferson offered a few comments to his friend James Madison (whom history has called its father). "I do not like … the omission of a bill of rights," he wrote. "Let me add that a bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth."

6. … AND SO WAS JOHN ADAMS.

John Adams
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Adams was away in Great Britain when the Constitution was being created. Upon reading its contents, he proclaimed that "A Declaration of Rights I Wish to see with all my heart, though I am sensible of the Difficulty in framing one, in which all the States can agree."

7. AT FIRST, JAMES MADISON THOUGHT THAT IT WOULD BE USELESS.

James Madison
National Archive/Newsmakers

From the onset, this future president admired the principle behind a bill of rights. Still, he initially saw no point in creating one. Madison explained his position to Jefferson in October 1788, writing, "My own opinion has always been in favor of a bill of rights … At the same time, I have never thought [its] omission a material defect." But Madison eventually changed his tune. After becoming a congressman in 1789, he formally introduced the amendments that would comprise the current bill of rights.

8. BEFORE HE COULD INTRODUCE THE BILL OF RIGHTS, MADISON HAD TO DEFEAT JAMES MONROE.

James Monroe
James Monroe
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Madison won his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives after running against the man who would become his Oval Office successor. Both candidates acted with civility: While on the campaign trail, they regularly dined together and even shared sleeping quarters.

9. CONGRESS PASSED 12 AMENDMENTS, BUT TWO WERE LATER EXCLUDED.

Declaration of Independence signatures
iStock.com/fstop123

Originally, Representative Madison presented 19 amendments. On August 24, 1789, the House green-lit 17 of them. That September, the Senate made some heavy edits, trimming these down to an even dozen, which the states then looked over. In the end, numbers three through 12 were approved and collectively became our Bill of Rights on December 15, 1791.

10. AN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT GOT ONE OF THOSE AXED AMENDMENTS RATIFIED IN 1992.

Bill of Rights
iStock.com/leezsnow

Better late than never. The second proposed amendment would have restricted Congress' ability to give itself a pay raise or cut. No law that tweaked the salaries of its members would take effect until after the next Congress had begun. Sensible as this idea sounds, the amendment wasn't ratified by the required three-fourths majority of U.S. states. So, for 202 years, it was stuck in limbo.

Enter Gregory Watson. His rollercoaster-like journey with the dormant proposal began in 1982. Then a student at the University of Texas, Watson was researching a term paper when he discovered this Congressional Pay Amendment. As he dug deeper, the undergrad found that it was still “technically pending before state legislatures.”

So Watson mounted an aggressive letter-writing campaign. Thanks to his urging, state after state finally ratified the amendment until, at last, over 38 had done so. After a bit of legal wrangling with Congress, on May 20, 1992, the constitution was updated to include it as the 27th (and most recent) amendment. (Watson, by the way, got a C on that term paper.)

11. SOME OF THE ORIGINAL COPIES WERE PROBABLY DESTROYED.

Original Bill of Rights
National Archives and Records Administration, WIkimedia Commons // Public Domain

During his first term, President Washington and Congress had 14 official handwritten replicas of the Bill of Rights made. At present, two are conspicuously unaccounted for.

One copy was retained by the federal government while the rest were sent off to the 11 states as well as Rhode Island and North Carolina, which had yet to ratify. Subsequently, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, and Georgia all lost theirs somehow. It's believed that the Empire State's was burned in a 1911 fire while Georgia’s likely went up in smoke during the Civil War.

In 1945, a long-lost original copy—experts aren't sure which—was gifted to the Library of Congress. Forty-nine years earlier, the New York Public Library had obtained another. Because it's widely believed that this one originally belonged to Pennsylvania, the document is currently being shared between the Keystone State and the NYPL until 2020, when New York will have it for 60 percent of the time and Pennsylvania for the rest.

12. NORTH CAROLINA'S COPY MAY HAVE BEEN STOLEN BY A CIVIL WAR SOLDIER.

General William Tecumseh Sherman, 1865.
General William Tecumseh Sherman, 1865.
National Archives and Records Administration, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

During the spring of 1865, Raleigh was firmly under the control of pro-Union troops. According to a statement released by the U.S. Attorney's office in that city, "Sometime during the occupation, a soldier in Gen. William Sherman's army allegedly took North Carolina's copy of the Bill of rights [from the state capitol] and carried it away."

Afterward, it changed hands several times and eventually came into antique dealer Wayne Pratt's possession. When the FBI learned of his plan to sell the priceless parchment, operatives seized it. In 2007, the copy went on a well-publicized tour of North Carolina before returning to Raleigh—hopefully for good.

13. THREE STATES DIDN'T RATIFY IT UNTIL 1939.

amendments
iStock.com/zimmytws

To celebrate the Constitution's 150th anniversary, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Georgia formally gave the Bill of Rights the approval they'd withheld for well over a century.

14. THE BILL OF RIGHTS'S LEAST-LITIGATED AMENDMENT IS THE THIRD.

1st amendment at Independence Hall
iStock.com/StephanieCraig

Thanks to this one, soldiers cannot legally be quartered inside your home without your consent. Since colonial Americans had lived in fear of being suddenly forced to house and feed British troops, the amendment was warmly received during the late 1700s. Today, however, it's rarely invoked. As of this writing, the Supreme Court has never based a decision upon it, so the American Bar Association once called this amendment the "runt piglet" of the constitution.

15. BILL OF RIGHTS DAY DATES BACK TO 1941.

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Central Press/Getty Images

On November 27, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt urged America's citizenry to celebrate December 15 as "Bill of Rights Day" in honor of its anniversary:

"I call upon the officials of the Government, and upon the people of the United States, to observe the day by displaying the flag of the United States on public buildings and by meeting together for such prayers and such ceremonies as may seem to them appropriate."

"It is especially fitting," he added, "that this anniversary should be remembered and observed by those institutions of a democratic people which owe their very existence to the guarantees of the Bill of Rights: the free schools, the free churches, the labor unions, the religious and educational and civic organizations of all kinds which, without the guarantee of the Bill of Rights, could never have existed; which sicken and disappear whenever, in any country, these rights are curtailed or withdrawn."

This story first ran in 2015.

8 Proper Facts About Jane Austen

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

More than 200 years after her death, English novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817) continues to be celebrated for her sharp, biting prose on love's various entanglements. The strong female characters in books like Pride and Prejudice and Emma are as resonant today as when Austen first pressed her pen to paper. Though her bibliography totals just six novels (alongside some unfinished novels and other works) in all, Austen's books and her insightful quotes have been subject to hundreds of years of analysis and—for the Austen die-hards—numerous re-readings. For more on the writer's life, influences, and curious editing habits, take a look at our compendium of all things Austen below.

1. Austen's dad did everything he could to help her succeed.

Austen was born in Steventon, Hampshire, England on December 16, 1775 to George Austen, a rector, and Cassandra Austen. The second-youngest in a brood of eight kids, Austen developed a love for the written word partially as a result of George's vast home library. When she wasn't reading, Austen was supplied with writing tools by George to nurture her interests along. Later, George would send his daughters to a boarding school to further their education. When Austen penned First Impressions, the book that would become Pride and Prejudice, in 1797, a proud George took it to a London publisher named Thomas Cadell for review. Cadell rejected it unread. It's not clear if Jane was even aware that George approached Cadell on her behalf.

Much later, in 1810, her brother Henry would act as her literary agent, selling Sense and Sensibility to London publisher Thomas Egerton.

2. Her works were published anonymously.

From Sense and Sensibility through Emma, Austen's published works never bore her name. Sense and Sensibility carried the byline of "A Lady," while later works like Pride and Prejudice featured credits like, "By the Author of Sense and Sensibility." It's likely Austen chose anonymity because female novelists were frowned upon for having selected what was viewed at the time as a potentially lewd, male-dominated pursuit. If she was interrupted while writing, she would quickly conceal her papers to avoid being asked about her work. Austen was first identified in print following her death in 1817; her brother Henry wrote a eulogy to accompany the posthumous publications of Persuasion and Northanger Abbey.

3. She backed out of a marriage of convenience.

Many of Austen's characters carry great agency in their lives, and Austen scholars enjoy pointing to the fact that Austen herself bucked convention when it came to affairs of the heart. The year after her family's move to the city of Bath in 1801, Austen received a proposal of marriage from Harris Bigg-Wither, a financially prosperous childhood friend. Austen accepted but quickly had second thoughts. Though his money would have provided for her and her family (and, at the time, she was 27 and unpublished, meaning she had no outside income and was fast approaching Georgian-era spinster status), Austen decided that a union motivated on her part by economics wasn't worthwhile. She turned the proposal down the following day and later cautioned her niece about marrying for any reason other than love. "Anything is to be preferred or endured rather than marrying without affection," she wrote.

4. She took a decade off.

Because so little of Austen's writing outside of her novels survives—her sister, Cassandra, purportedly destroyed much of her correspondence in an effort to keep some of Austen's scathing opinions away from polite society—it can be hard to assign motivations or emotions to some of her major milestones in life. But one thing appears clear: When her family moved to Bath and subsequently kept relocating following her father's death in 1805, Austen's writing habits were severely disrupted. Once prolific—she completed three of her novels by 1801—a lack of a routine kept her from producing work for roughly 10 years. It wasn't until she felt her home life was stable after moving into property owned by her brother, Edward, that Austen resumed her career.

5. She used straight pins to edit her manuscripts.

Austen had none of the advancements that would go on to make a writer's life easier, like typewriters, computers, or Starbucks. In at least one case, her manuscript edits were accomplished using the time-consuming and prickly method of straight pins. For an unfinished novel titled The Watsons, Austen took the pins and used them to fasten revisions to the pages of areas that were in need of correction or rewrites. The practice dates back to the 17th century.

6. She was an accomplished home brewer.

In Austen's time, beer was the drink of choice, and like the rest of her family, Austen could brew her own beer. Her specialty was spruce beer, which was made with molasses for a slightly sweeter taste.

Austen was also a fan of making mead—she once lamented to her sister, "there is no honey this year. Bad news for us. We must husband our present stock of mead, and I am sorry to perceive that our twenty gallons is very nearly out. I cannot comprehend how the fourteen gallons could last so long."

7. Some believe Austen's death was a result of being poisoned.

Austen lived to see only four of her six novels published. She died on July 18, 1817 at the age of 41 following complaints of symptoms that medical historians have long felt pointed to Addison's disease or Hodgkin's lymphoma. In 2017, the British Library floated a different theory—that Austen was poisoned by arsenic in her drinking water due to a polluted supply or possibly accidental ingestion due to mismanaged medication. The Library put forth the idea based on Austen's notoriously poor eyesight (which they say may have been the result of cataracts) as well as her written complaint of skin discoloration. Both can be indicative of arsenic exposure. Critics of the theory say the evidence is scant and that there is equal reason to believe a disease was the cause of her death.

8. She's been cited in at least 27 written court decisions.

As Matthew Birkhold of Electric Lit points out, judges seem to have a bit of a preoccupation with the works of Austen. Birkhold found 27 instances of a judge's written ruling invoking the name or words of the author, joining a rather exclusive club of female writers who tend to pop up in judicial decisions. (Harper Lee and Mary Shelley round out the top three.) According to Birkhold, jurists often use Austen as a kind of shorthand to explain matters involving relationships or class distinctions. Half of the decisions used the opening line from Pride and Prejudice: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife." The sentence is often rewritten to reflect the specifics of a case: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a recently widowed woman in possession of a good fortune must be in want of an estate planner," as one 2008 tax court case put it.

Others invoke characters like Fitzwilliam Darcy to compare or contrast the litigant's romantic situation. In most cases, the intent is clear, with authors realizing that their readers consider Austen's name synonymous with literary—and hopefully judicial—wisdom.

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