Open Offices Are Bad for Productivity, Study Finds

iStock
iStock

The results of a new study from Oxford Economics should sound familiar to anyone working in a cubicle. As Forbes reports, working in an open office lowers employees' output as well as their morale. 

For their study, researchers surveyed over 1200 senior executives and non-executive employees about their workplace arrangements. While 53 percent of employees reported feeling less satisfied and less productive when they had to work through ambient noise, only 35 percent of executives felt the same way.

The disconnect between the perceptions of management and the people they employ was evident in other areas as well. Just 41 percent of employees said they have the necessary tools to filter out distractions, while 63 percent of executives felt that their employees had everything they needed. Fifty-two percent of employees described work/life balance as being very important to them. When employers were asked the same question about their team, only 34 percent of executives said that balance was a priority for their employees.

These discrepancies aren’t too surprising when you compare the work life of an executive to that of a lower-level employee. The study reveals that a majority of executives are equipped with tools that make it easy to do their jobs outside the office, while less than half of employees can say the same. The most drastic difference between the two groups is their physical workspace. Sixty-two percent of top-level workers have a private office—a privilege granted to just 14 percent of employees.

With so many executives lucky enough to have a quiet space to call their own, it makes sense that minimizing distractions was ranked last on their list of priorities when laying out an office. But when team productivity is at stake, poor office design is bad for everyone. Distractions can have such a negative impact, another study suggests employees may be better off working from home.

These Food Pun Coasters Are Fun for the Whole Family

Courtesy of Marie Saba
Courtesy of Marie Saba

Romaine calm. Gouda vibes only. Everything happens for a raisin.

We at Mental Floss love puns—especially food puns—and these ones come courtesy of chef, author, and expert pie baker Marie Saba. Her food pun coasters are a delightfully "corny" take on popular motivational and endearing phrases. Keep calm and carry on? More like curry on.

As Saba tells Mental Floss, the idea for her coasters sprang from food pun Valentines she created a few years ago. She was sick of the same old sayings featured on the kind of mass-produced cards you'd find at supermarkets, so she decided to make her own. The more punny products she made, the larger her Instagram following grew. Eventually she decided to branch out and try a new craft.

"Quite a few followers asked to buy prints of the puns, so that led me to the coasters," she says. "The coasters are perfect because you can set them out at a party, or on your office desk, and they're an instant conversation piece. Most of them take some effort to figure out, and I think people enjoy the challenge."

The coasters, made of durable cardboard, are available on Saba's website. They’re priced at $18 for a pack of eight coasters, and they're grouped into different themes, including motivational, snarky, complimentary, and Christmas. Keep scrolling to see some of the different versions on offer.

A pun that reads as "Love you from my head to-ma-toes"
Courtesy of Marie Saba

The pun reads "We're a perfect matcha"
Courtesy of Marie Saba

A pun reads "Wind beneath my wings"
Courtesy of Marie Saba

A pun reads "You're my everything (bagel)"
Courtesy of Marie Saba

This Stylish Cardboard Box Is Designed to Be Your Cat’s New Favorite Hideout

Scott Salzman
Scott Salzman

You can buy your cat a fancy bed or perch, but when it comes right down to it, your feline friend is probably going to be more eager to curl up in the cardboard box that it arrived in. So why not just cut out the part where you spend time and money picking out something your cat couldn’t care less about? Just get a really nice box. That’s the premise behind the Purrfect Cat Box, a cardboard box specifically tailored to cats’ needs.

While every cat is finicky in his or her own way, almost all cats love a good cardboard box. (Seriously, it’s science.) Squeezing into a cozy box makes cats feel protected, and, since cats like warmer temperatures, the insulating cardboard also helps keep them at their preferred level of toasty.

Designed by Colorado-based inventor Scott Salzman, the Purrfect Cat Box is made to be just the right size for ultimate kitty comfort. At about the size of a shoebox, it’s big enough for most cats to squeeze into without being cramped—though Salzman doesn’t specify whether it will work for big breeds like Maine Coons—but small enough that they still feel protected inside. It has a small cutout in the front to allow your cat to peek his head outside the box, and, most importantly, to get in a really good chin scratch.

While we humans might find cardboard cars or cardboard Taj Mahal replicas adorable, most cats just want a plain box that makes them feel safe and comfortable. The geometric-patterned Purrfect Cat Box walks the line between utilitarian and chic, making the empty cardboard box in your living room a little bit less of an eyesore.

Plus, it’s cardboard-priced. At $6 a box, it's about what you'd pay to have a regular cardboard box full of anything from Amazon delivered to your door, but it’s still inexpensive enough that if your cat destroys it, it’s easy enough to throw in the recycle bin and get a new one.

Get it on Indiegogo.

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