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Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Universal Pictures
Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Universal Pictures

Ice Cube and the Goodyear Blimp's Good Day

Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Universal Pictures
Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Universal Pictures

January 20, 1992 might have been a good day for Ice Cube. In 2012, comedian Donovan Strain claimed to have pinpointed the exact day the rapper was referring to in his 1993 song "It Was a Good Day," based on clues he dropped in the lyrics: It was a day the L.A. Lakers beat the Seattle Supersonics; Yo! MTV Raps was on the air; it was a smog-free day in the Los Angeles area; beepers were in use; and Ice Cube wasn't on tour or busy with other events. All of those things combined resulted in just one single possibility, according to Strain: January 20, 1992.

Another blogger disputed the date in question, submitting his own reasoning about why November 30, 1988 was the "good day" in question. Cube himself settled the controversy in 2012: "It's a fictional song," he told Moviefone.

The first theory stuck, however, and Goodyear cemented the date when they invited Strain, Ice Cube, and a few other guests to visit their airport for a special event on January 20, 2014. In response to a fundraising campaign for the South Central Los Angeles nonprofit organization A Place Called Home, Goodyear made part of the song a reality by displaying "Ice Cube Says Today Was a Good Day" on the blimp as it cruised around Los Angeles.

Okay, so it wasn't quite accurate to the song, where the rapper notices the blimp conveying a slightly different message: "Ice Cube's a pimp." But no one's complaining: The stunt raised $25,000 for the charity.

"It's a dream come true … it’s surreal … it's something that I never thought in a million years could happen," Cube said. "It's pretty awesome. Today was definitely a good day in so many ways."

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This Just In
Kentucky City Lets Residents Pay Parking Tickets With Canned Goods
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Racking up parking fines? If you live in Lexington, Kentucky, you can pay off your tickets with canned food donations.

ABC 36 reports that, for the fourth year in a row, the city's “Food for Fines” program will help stock the shelves of God’s Pantry Food Bank—a member of Feeding America—throughout the holiday season. Beginning today, the city’s local parking authority is allowing residents with outstanding citations to donate preserved goods in lieu of cash through December 15.

Ten cans will get residents a $15 credit on any parking citation. And for drivers with a drawer-full of tickets, they can bring as many cans as they can carry to earn a $15 credit per 10-can donation. (Yes, even past due citations are eligible.)

"During the previous three years we have collected 24,500 cans of food, which is the equivalent of 12 tons or 16,000 meals,” Parking Authority executive director Gary Means said in a press release.

If you're planning on donating, make sure to check the date: Expired items won't be accepted.

[h/t ABC 36]  

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Animals
Los Angeles's Top Architects Design Pet Shelters to Benefit Homeless Cats
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Los Angeles design firms Abramson Teiger Architects, d3architecture, and KnowHow Shop are known for producing some of the city's most distinct examples of architecture. But for this year’s “Giving Shelter” event in Culver City, local architects were tasked with designing structures on a much smaller scale than what they’re used to. Each piece auctioned off at the fundraiser was built with feline inhabitants in mind, and the proceeds from the night went to benefit homeless cats in the area.

L.A. is home to one of the largest stray cat populations in the country, with between 1 and 3 million cats living on the streets. Each year, architects involved with the group Architects for Animals design innovative shelters to raise money for FixNation, a nonprofit organization that spays and neuters the city's homeless cats. This year, the cat homes that were showcased included bird houses, AC vents, and a giant ball of yarn.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Shelter for a cat.

Anyone who’s familiar with Architects for Animals shouldn’t be surprised by the creativity of this year’s entries. Last year’s Giving Shelter event included a Brutalist interpretation of a classic tête-à-tête seat.

All images courtesy of MeghanBobPhotography / Architects for Animals

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