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Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
New Line Cinema

17 Connected Facts About Magnolia

Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
New Line Cinema

Fortified with complete creative control fresh off his critically praised instant classic Boogie Nights (1997), Paul Thomas Anderson wrote and directed Magnolia (1999). It is a sprawling yet intimate story that features an all-star cast, including Jason Robards, Tom Cruise, John C. Reilly, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Julianne Moore, and William H. Macy. The unconventional film helped Anderson score his second Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay, along with Cruise, who was nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role.

1. PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON ORIGINALLY WANTED TO MAKE A SMALL, CHEAP MOVIE.

"The truth of the matter is when I sat down to write Magnolia, I truly sat down to write something very small, very quick, very intimate, and something I could make very cheaply," Anderson recalled of his initial intention. "Boogie Nights was this massive, two-and-a-half-hour epic. And I thought, 'You know what? I wanna bury my head in the sand and just make a little small movie.'"

But of course, that wasn't the final result. "I started to write and well, it kept blossoming. And I got to the point where still it's a very intimate movie, but I realized I had so many actors I wanted to write for that the form started to come more from them. Then I thought it would be really interesting to put this epic spin on topics that don't necessarily get the epic treatment, which is usually reserved for war movies or political topics. But the things that I know as big and emotional are these real intimate everyday moments, like losing your car keys, for example. You could start with something like that and go anywhere."

Anderson wrote a draft of the script in William H. Macy's cabin in Vermont. Anderson was scared to venture outside the cabin because he spotted a snake, and that bit of fear helped him concentrate on writing.

2. ANDERSON WROTE THE SCRIPT TO AIMEE MANN'S MUSIC.

Anderson and Aimee Mann were friends, so he not only listened to her music while writing, but had some unreleased demos to use as creative inspiration as well. "In a way, I sat down to adapt one of her songs," he said. "There’s a song called 'Deathly' that she wrote and the very first line of the song is 'Now that I’ve met you, would you object to never seeing me again?' Melora Walters says that in the movie. That sort of notion of being unlovable or being so fu*ked up you can’t understand how anyone could love you back was really important and really beautiful to me. It kind of made sense to me at that time in my life. I probably owe Aimee a ton of money for the inspiration she was to this movie."

Most memorably, Mann's "Wise Up" plays toward the end of the film, with each character singing along. Anderson worried it might come off as ridiculous, "but I tricked everyone by getting Julianne Moore to do it first. She can always set the pace, because actors are so competitive. Then everyone was up for it."

3. GEORGE C. SCOTT WAS NOT A FAN.

The role of Earl Partridge was initially written for, and ultimately played by, Jason Robards, but at first Robards was not able to accept because of a serious staph infection. So Anderson went to George C. Scott, who, according to Anderson, threw the script across the room and said, "This is the worst f***ing thing I've ever read. The language is terrible."

4. TOM CRUISE SIGNED UP AFTER SEEING BOOGIE NIGHTS.

Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman watched Boogie Nights one night while shooting Eyes Wide Shut (1999) in England. Cruise enjoyed the film so much that he actually called Anderson to congratulate him and invited him to Stanley Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut set in England. After they met, Cruise asked Anderson to write a role for him. Frank "T.J." Mackey was offered to Cruise six months later.

5. CRUISE AND ANDERSON SHAPED CRUISE'S CHARACTER.

Anderson had written Mackey in golf pants and polo shirts, like the character's former paralegal inspiration, but Cruise convinced his director he would wear an armband, “those leather-wrist, masculine hero kind of things," and the whole wardrobe changed. "Several" video reenactments of Mackey bedding women were cut from the film. It wasn't until they started shooting the scene of Mackey stripping naked in front of Gwenovier (April Grace) that Anderson told Cruise to take off his pants in addition to his shirt. Cruise asked, "What?" Anderson replied, "Yeah, yeah, yeah. It’ll be funny."

The script as written had Mackey break down when he got to his dying father's door. Cruise didn't "feel" that and changed the scene, including adding the part when he threatens Phil Parma by saying he will drop-kick the dogs. Cruise thought it would be funny if Mackey was afraid of canines. As part of his contract, Cruise was purposely barely visible on the movie poster, because he would have overshadowed the ensemble cast, and his character was, as The New York Times put it, "inconsistent" with the Cruise brand at the time.

6. PHILIP BAKER HALL CONVINCED ANDERSON TO KEEP THE FROGS IN THE MOVIE.

After Anderson told Philip Baker Hall his next movie was going to feature a sequence where it rains frogs, Hall, who had already acted in Anderson's two previous films (Hard Eight, Boogie Nights), had a story for him. "Philip had been driving on a mountain pass in Switzerland and he said for about 15 minutes it rained frogs," Anderson said. "It was really foggy and the mountain road was covered in ice. The frogs falling was not the thing that freaked him out. What freaked him out was that his car could not get any traction and he was afraid he was gonna fall off the mountain! I just thought right then and there I gotta go through with this sequence."

7. THERE ARE A LOT OF EXODUS 8:2 REFERENCES IN IT.

"I’d be a liar if I said to you it was written initially as a Biblical reference," Anderson admitted of the frog scene. "I truthfully didn’t even know it was in the Bible when I first wrote the sequence." He had in fact read about a rain of frogs from the writings of author Charles Fort (The Book of the Damned). Once he realized it was in the Bible, specifically Exodus 8:2, he had the set decorator "surprise" him with how many 8s and 2s he can hide in the background. The numbers appeared in everything from weather forecasts to apartment numbers and decks of cards.

8. JOHN C. REILLY AND ANDERSON DEVELOPED THE ACTOR'S MUSTACHIOED CHARACTER WHILE TRYING TO PARODY THE SHOW COPS.

Before Boogie Nights came out, Anderson and John C. Reilly were unemployed and obsessed with Cops. When Reilly grew a mustache for fun (looking like many of the officers on the series), Anderson insisted they do their own parody of the Fox show, which Jennifer Jason Leigh and Philip Seymour Hoffman later appeared in. Some of Reilly's lines in those shorts made it into the movie, but his character became smarter and more sympathetic because Anderson wanted to make the actor a romantic lead.

9. ANDERSON PURPOSELY WROTE MACY'S CHARACTER TO HAVE A BIG EMOTIONAL MOMENT.

Anderson told The Guardian that he wrote an emotional scene for Macy almost as a way to challenge him. "I think he's scared of big emotional parts—he thinks actors shouldn't cry—so I wrote a big tearful, emotional part just for him," Anderson said.

10. STANLEY WAS AN ACTUAL SMART KID, AND HIS STORY WAS INFLUENCED BY FIONA APPLE.

Jeremy Blackman made his feature film debut in Magnolia as kid genius Stanley Spector. Before that, he was a recipient of the President of the United States Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement.

His character not being allowed to use the restroom was based on a story Anderson's then-girlfriend, singer Fiona Apple, once told him. "She had to go to the bathroom in some kind of taping situation, " Anderson remembered, "and they just said, 'Well, can you just hold it and do this thing for us first?’ And she did. And when she told me this story, I wanted to strangle every person involved." (Apple also created some of the paintings in the background of the film.)

11. PATTON OSWALT WASN'T PRIVY TO THE PLOT OF THE FILM.

Patton Oswalt portrayed blackjack dealer/scuba diver Delmer Darion, and had his own unique and telling experience of working on the movie, which he shared with The A.V. Club:

"Delmer Darion. God. I was doing a show one night, and I went back in the kitchen and was hanging out, and Paul Thomas Anderson was there. We were just talking, and he was like, 'I’m doing this movie if you want a part in it.' I said, 'Yeah, sure.' So they called me the next day and said I needed to come in to be fitted for a wetsuit. I said, 'Can I see the screenplay first?' And they were like, 'Nope.' So I went in and got this custom wetsuit made, and they gave me two pages of the script and flew me to Reno. We shot this scene and then hung out all night drinking. And a week later, we were shooting and I was in the wetsuit. It was so hot to the point where I wasn’t even sweating anymore. And Paul was dumping bottles of water on my head to keep me from passing out and I was like, 'Paul, what are we doing?' He said, 'I can’t say right now, but I’ll just say that you are the first frog that falls out of the sky.' And I went, 'Okay.' So that’s what working with PTA is like."

12. THOMAS JANE WAS SUPPOSED TO HAVE TWO ROLES IN THE FILM.

Thomas Jane was originally supposed to have two roles in the film, but only portrayed the younger version of Jimmy Gator because he took another gig (Under Suspicion with Gene Hackman). "Paul (Thomas Anderson) never forgave me," Jane revealed. "And the movie with Gene Hackman, of course, has been totally forgotten."

13. THEY USED AN AUTHENTIC TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY CAMERA.

For the 1911 hanging, Anderson shot through a hand-cranked Pathe camera. "It's fun to see what it was like in 1911 hand-cranking the camera, finding out the limitations, the difficulties. You feel like you are there for a minute or two. And that's what I believe: you just can't fake it," Anderson said.

For the look of the other scenes, Anderson and director of photography Robert Elswit watched Being There (1979), Ordinary People (1980), Network (1976), and The Verdict (1982) before filming. "In terms of lighting styles, my brain took me to Eastern, wintertime movies, and I think that that seeped in [to this picture's palette]," Anderson said. "Sometimes we strayed from our plan, but my big goal was to make everything look like one story, so it didn't have the feeling of a vignette movie."

14. THE PHONE NUMBERS USED TO WORK.

Phil Parma dialed 818-775-3993 in the movie. When people dialed that number while the film was in theaters, they got the voicemail of a flustered woman saying, "Please leave a message at the tone." If you dialed Frank "T.J." Mackey's 1-877-TAMEHER, you would have heard Mackey's "Seduce and Destroy" program speech. If you dialed that number in 2011, The Chicago Tribune reported, it connected to a health club's corporate office.

15. ANDERSON INSISTED ON THE LONG RUNNING TIME, THEN LATER REGRETTED IT.

After New Line Cinema head of production Michael De Luca read Anderson's Magnolia script for the first time (on a Sunday, while Anderson watched movies in De Luca's screening room), De Luca was "ecstatic," then asked if there was any chance of cutting it down to two hours and 45 minutes. Anderson said "no." Since De Luca agreed to give Anderson creative control before seeing the script, there was nothing he could do. The running time was 188 minutes.

In 2015, Anderson admitted to Marc Maron that he regretted pushing for the three-plus hours of film. “I wasn’t really editing myself,” he said. “It’s way too fu*king long.”

16. THE REAL T.J. MACKEY CONSIDERED SUING.

Anderson got the initial idea of a pickup artist character from his friend, who taught an audio-recording engineering class. Two of his friends' students talked one day in the recording studio and their teacher recorded it. When the teacher played the unlabeled DAT years later, he was shocked to hear two guys quoting "seduction expert" Ross Jeffries. Anderson had John C. Reilly and Chris Penn read the transcription of the tape and incorporate it into the Mackey character. “He lifted some stuff almost word for word,” Jeffries later said. He ended up not suing because, according to Jeffries, he liked the movie.

17. IT WAS JASON ROBARDS'S FINAL FILM.

Sadly, Robards—like his character Earl Partridge—passed away from lung cancer, in December 2000. He was 78 years old.

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Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
Jenny Anderson, Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions
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10 Things You Might Not Know About Tina Fey
Jenny Anderson, Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions
Jenny Anderson, Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions

Tina Fey has transformed modern comedy more than just about anyone else. From the main stage of Second City to the writer’s room of SNL to extremely fetch comedy blockbusters, Elizabeth Stamatina Fey has built a national stage with a dry, eye-popping sarcasm and political satire where no one is safe. She has a slew of Emmys, Golden Globes, SAG, PGA, and WGA awards to prove it—plus a recent Tony nomination (her first). But, more importantly, she’s the closest thing we have to a national comic laureate.

Here are 10 facts about a fantastically blorft American icon.

1. SHE DID A BOOK REPORT ON COMEDY WHEN SHE WAS 11.

Fey got a very early start in comedy, watching a lot of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Bob Newhart, and Norman Lear shows as a kid. Her father and mother sneaked her in to see Young Frankenstein and would let her stay up late to watch The Honeymooners. So it’s no surprise that she chose comedy as the subject of a middle school project. The only book she could get her hands on was Joe Franklin’s Encyclopedia of Comedians, but at least she made a friend. "I remember me and one other girl in my 8th grade class got to do an independent study because we finished the regular material early, and she chose to do hers on communism, and I chose to do mine on comedy," Fey told The A.V. Club. "We kept bumping into each other at the card catalog."

2. THE SCAR ON HER FACE CAME FROM A BIZARRE ATTACK THAT OCCURRED WHEN SHE WAS A CHILD.

Fey’s facial scar had been recognizable but unexplained for years until a profile in Vanity Fair revealed that the mark on her left cheek came from being slashed by a strange man when she was five years old. “She just thought somebody marked her with a pen,” her husband Jeff Richmond said. Fey wrote in Bossypants that it happened in an alleyway behind her Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, home when she was in kindergarten.

3. HER FIRST TV APPEARANCE WAS IN A BANK COMMERCIAL.

Saturday Night Live hired Fey as a writer in 1997. In 1995 she had the slightly more glamorous job of pitching Mutual Savings Bank with a radical floral applique vest and a handful of puns on the word “Hi.” In a bit of life imitating art, just as Liz Lemon’s 1-900-OKFACE commercial was unearthed and mocked on 30 Rock, the internet discovered Fey’s stint awkwardly cheering on high interest rates a few years ago and had a lot to say about her '90s hair.

4. SHE WAS THE FIRST WOMAN TO BE NAMED HEAD WRITER OF SNL.

Four years after that commercial and two after she joined Saturday Night Live’s writing staff, Fey earned a promotion to head writer. Up until that point, the head writers were named Michael, Herb, Bob, Jim, Steve. You get the picture. She acted as head writer for six seasons until moving on to write and executive produce 30 Rock. Since her departure, two more women (Paula Pell and Sara Schneider) have been head writers for the iconic show.

5. SHE’S THE YOUNGEST MARK TWAIN PRIZE WINNER.

Established in 1998, the Kennedy Center’s hilarious honor has mostly been awarded to funny people in the twilight of their careers. Richard Pryor was the first recipient, and comedians who made their marks decades prior like Lily Tomlin, Whoopi Goldberg, and George Carlin followed. Fey earned the award in 2010 when she was 40 years old, and the age of her successors (Carol Burnett, Bill Murray, Eddie Murphy, David Letterman ...) signals that she may hold the title of youngest recipient for some time.

6. SHE WROTE SATIRE FOR HER HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPER.

Fey was an outstanding student who was involved in choir, drama, and tennis, and co-edited the school’s newspaper, The Acorn. She also wrote a satirical column addressing “school policy and teachers” under the pun-tastic pseudonym “The Colonel.” Fey also recalled getting in trouble because she tried to make a pun on the phrase “annals of history.” Cheeky.

7. SHE MADE HER RAP DEBUT WITH CHILDISH GAMBINO ON "REAL ESTATE."

Donald Glover (a.k.a. Childish Gambino) first gained notice as a member of Derrick Comedy in college, and Fey hired him at the age of 23 to write for 30 Rock. Before jumping from that show to Community, Glover put out his first mixtape under his stage name. After releasing his debut album, Camp, in 2011, Gambino dropped a sixth mixtape called Royalty that featured Fey rapping on a song called “Real Estate.” “My president is black, and my Prius is blue!"

8. SHE VOICED PRINCESSES IN A BELOVED PINBALL GAME.

Between the bank commercial and Saturday Night Live, Fey has an intriguing credit on her resume: the arcade pinball machine “Medieval Madness.” Most of the game’s Arthurian dialogue was written by Second City members Scott Adsit (Pete Hornberger on 30 Rock) and Kevin Dorff, who pulled in fellow Second City castmate Fey to voice for an “Opera Singer” princess, Cockney-speaking princesses, and a character with a southern drawl. (You can hear some of the outtakes here.)

9. SHE USED MEAN GIRLS TO PUSH BACK AGAINST STEREOTYPES OF WOMEN IN MATH.

Tina Fey and Lindsay Lohan in 'Mean Girls' (2004)
Paramount Home Entertainment

There’s a ton of interesting trivia about Mean Girls, Fey’s first foray into feature film screenwriting. She bid on the rights to Rosalind Wiseman’s book that inspired the movie without realizing it didn’t have a plot. She initially wrote a large part for herself but kept whittling it down to focus on the teenagers, and her first draft was “for sure R-rated.” Fey also chose to play a math teacher to fight prejudice. “It was an attempt on my part to counteract the stereotype that girls can’t do math. Even though I did not understand a word I was saying.” Fey used a friend’s calculus teacher boyfriend’s lesson plans in the script.

10. SHE SET UP A SCHOLARSHIP IN HER FATHER’S NAME TO HELP VETERANS.

Fey’s father Donald was a Korean War veteran who also studied journalism at Temple University. When he died in 2015, Fey and her brother Peter founded a memorial scholarship in his name that seeks to aid veterans who want to study journalism at Temple.

"He was really inspiring," Fey said. "A lot of kids grow up with dreams of doing those things and their parents are fearful and want them to get a law degree and have things to fall back on, but he and our mom always encouraged us to pursue whatever truly interested us." Fey also supports Autism Speaks, Mercy Corps, Love Our Children USA, and other charities.

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Tom Cruise stars as Frank T.J. Mackey in Magnolia (1999).
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Deadpool Fans Have a Wild Theory About Who Cable Really Is
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Deadpool 2 is officially in theaters and ruling the box office just like its predecessor did back in 2015. But this installment is about more than just crude jokes and over-the-top action scenes; it also includes the debut of a longtime Marvel character that fans have been clamoring to see on the big screen since 2000’s X-Men hit theaters: Cable.

But the Cable in Deadpool 2 isn’t quite the one fans have gotten used to in the books—for starters, his powers and backstory are reined in considerably. While it’s easy to assume that’s by design, so that audiences can better relate to the character (which is played by Josh Brolin), some fans have speculated that the changes are because, well, this character isn’t really Cable at all; instead, Screen Rant has a theory that this version of the character is actually none other than an older Wolverine from the future.

So how can Wolverine be Cable? Well, it’s actually quite easy, considering that Wolverine was Cable in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe comics, which was a series of books in the 2000s that completely reimagined the regular Marvel Universe. In this reality, a grizzled, aged Wolverine takes on the Cable nickname and travels back in time to prevent a takeover of Earth from the villain Apocalypse.

We were already introduced to Apocalypse in 2016’s X-Men: Apocalypse, and while he was defeated in the end, Screen Rant theorizes that he could return like he does in the Ultimate X-Men comics: by inhabiting the body of Nathaniel Essex, a.k.a. Mister Sinister. Essex was already name-dropped in Apocalypse and Deadpool 2, so it stands to reason that there might be some larger story on the horizon for him.

This would, of course, lead to more X-Men movies down the road, with Cable revealing his true nature and teaming with a crew of mutants that includes the classic X-Men cast as well as their younger selves to battle a newly formed Apocalypse. It’d also allow the character of Wolverine to live on in Brolin, leaving Hugh Jackman to enjoy a retired life without claws.

Obviously this is just one fan theory based on a comic storyline from over a decade ago. It would also have to ignore a whole host of continuity problems—including the events of Logan. But having a twist with Cable actually being Wolverine from the future (and likely from a different reality) is the type of headache-inducing madness the comics are known for.

[h/t: Screen Rant]

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