13 Discontinued Doritos Flavors

While Nacho Cheese and Cool Ranch (also known as Cool American in Europe) have long been America's favorite Doritos flavors, Frito-Lay has released quite a number of exciting and interesting flavors that are, sadly, no longer available. Here are 13 discontinued Doritos flavors.

1. SOUR CREAM AND ONION

During the '70s, Doritos introduced a Sour Cream and Onion flavor. It was later discontinued in the early '80s, but brought back as a “throwback” flavor for a limited time in 2013.

2. CHESTER'S CHEESE

In 1995, Doritos and Cheetos teamed up to introduce Chester's Cheese Doritos. The snack combined the cheese flavor of Cheetos, but on a crunchy Doritos tortilla chip. They were only available for a short time.

3. PIZZA CRAVERS AND TACO SUPREME

During the late '90s, PepsiCo spun off its restaurant division into Yum! Brands, which included Pizza Hut and Taco Bell. Doritos, which is a Frito-Lay and PepsiCo product, released Pizza Cravers in a collaboration with Pizza Hut. Around the same time, Doritos also made a Taco Supreme Doritos with Taco Bell flavorings.

4. JUMPIN' JACK CHEESE

In 1990, Doritos introduced a new pepper jack Jumpin' Jack Cheese flavor with a pre-Tonight Show Jay Leno assuring America that teens know good cheese. It was discontinued during the early '90s, but made a comeback as a limited edition “throwback” flavor in 2013. 

5. ROLLITOS

During the early 2000s, Doritos rolled their standard triangular chips into small tubes and called them Rollitos. Frito-Lay boasted that it was an easier way to eat Doritos with the same taste and flavor, only with a louder crunch. The newly-shaped chips came in four flavors, including Nacho Cheesier, Zesty Taco, Cooler Ranch, and Queso Picante. In 2013, Doritos re-branded Rollitos as Dinamitas, or little sticks of dynamite.

6. COLLISIONS

In 2007, Doritos released Doritos Collisions, which featured two distinctive flavors and varieties mixed together in one bag. Fans of Doritos Collisions were treated to mashups such as Hot Wings & Blue Cheese, Zesty Taco & Chipotle Ranch, Habanero & Guacamole, Cheesy Enchilada & Sour Cream, and Pizza Cravers & Ranch. Although the snacks were popular, Doritos Collisions were discontinued a few years later.

7. X-13D FLAVOR EXPERIMENT

In 2007, Doritos introduced mystery chips that appeared in grocery stores in all-black unidentified bags with only the name Doritos X-13D Flavor Experiment and the tagline “Tasting notes: All-American Classic” printed on them. It was part of a promotion that allowed fans to name the new mystery Doritos, which closely resembled a cheeseburger taste.

8. LATE NIGHT ALL-NIGHTER CHEESEBURGER

Doritos launched Late Night All-Nighter Cheeseburger from the “Doritos X-13D Flavor Experiment”—the chips tasted like a cheeseburger with a hint of pickle. They also released Late Night Tacos at Midnight and Late Night Last Call Jalapeño Popper flavors for a limited time in 2008.

9. THE QUEST

In 2008, Doritos held another mystery chip contest called The Quest where participants had to solve puzzles and gather clues to determine the identity of the new flavor. A few weeks later, Doritos announced the mystery flavor was Mountain Dew, which coincided with the release of the soda’s "Dewmocracy" flavors, which were Mountain Dew Supernova (grape), Mountain Dew Revolution (cotton candy), and Mountain Dew Voltage (raspberry).

10. ROULETTE

After seeing success in their South African, Venezuelan, and Canadian markets, Doritos introduced a limited-edition Roulette package to the U.S. in 2015—each bag of Doritos Roulette contained a handful of extra spicy chips in addition to the traditional nacho cheese flavor. Doritos boasted that one in six chips in each bag were so spicy, they "may bring you to tears."

11. 3D DORITOS

When 3D Doritos were released during the mid-'90s, they were described as "Doritos-meets-Bugles." They had a puff of air inside them, making them more round than traditional Doritos. 3D Doritos came in various flavors, such as Jalapeño Cheddar, Nacho Cheese, and Zesty Ranch. They also came in a mini version and were sold in plastic cylinders with a pop-top, like Pringles. 3D Doritos were discontinued sometime in the early 2000s, but were later modified and re-released as Doritos Jacked 3D in 2015. Instead of being thin puffs with an empty center, Doritos Jacked 3D are thick and raised and resemble triangle-shaped Funyuns.

12. DEGREE BURN

In 2010, Doritos came out with three limited edition Degree Burn flavors: 1st Degree Burn Blazin’ Jalapeño, 2nd Degree Burn Fiery Buffalo, and 3rd Degree Burn Scorchin’ Habanero, which were bright red and loaded with spicy powder. Doritos released the chips in a cross promotion with Pepsi’s Cease Fire Max Citrus Freeze flavor—the idea being that eating Doritos would heat you up, while drinking Pepsi would cool you down.

13. SMOKEY RED BBQ

Another Doritos flavor, Smokey Red Barbecue, was released in the late '90s and eventually discontinued. But a commerical for them was the second to star "the Doritos girl," Ali Landry, which effectively launched her acting career. In 2002, Landry said, "It's the best thing that ever happened in my career—and that includes becoming Miss USA."

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Big Questions
Why Does Asparagus Make Your Pee Smell Funny?
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The asparagus has a long and storied history. It was mentioned in the myths and the scholarly writings of ancient Greece, and its cultivation was the subject of a detailed lesson in Cato the Elder's treatise, On Agriculture. But it wasn't until the turn of the 18th century that discussion of the link between asparagus and odorous urine emerged. In 1731, John Arbuthnot, physician to Queen Anne, noted in a book about food that asparagus "affects the urine with a foetid smell ... and therefore have been suspected by some physicians as not friendly to the kidneys." Benjamin Franklin also noticed that eating asparagus "shall give our urine a disagreeable odor."

Since then, there has been debate over what is responsible for the stinky pee phenomenon. Polish chemist and doctor Marceli Nencki identified a compound called methanethiol as the cause in 1891, after a study that involved four men eating about three and a half pounds of asparagus apiece. In 1975, Robert H. White, a chemist at the University of California at San Diego, used gas chromatography to pin down several compounds known as S-methyl thioesters as the culprits. Other researchers have blamed various "sulfur-containing compounds" and, simply, "metabolites."

More recently, a study demonstrated that asparagusic acid taken orally by subjects known to produce stinky asparagus pee produced odorous urine, which contained the same volatile compounds found in their asparagus-induced odorous urine. Other subjects, who normally didn't experience asparagus-induced odorous urine, likewise were spared stinky pee after taking asparagusic acid.

The researchers concluded that asparagusic acid and its derivatives are the precursors of urinary odor (compared, in different scientific papers, to the smell of "rotten cabbage," "boiling cabbage" and "vegetable soup"). The various compounds that contribute to the distinct smell—and were sometimes blamed as the sole cause in the past—are metabolized from asparagusic acid.

Exactly how these compounds are produced as we digest asparagus remains unclear, so let's turn to an equally compelling, but more answerable question:

WHY DOESN'T ASPARAGUS MAKE YOUR PEE SMELL FUNNY?

Remember when I said that some people don't produce stinky asparagus pee? Several studies have shown that only some of us experience stinky pee (ranging from 20 to 40 percent of the subjects taking part in the study, depending on which paper you read), while the majority have never had the pleasure.

For a while, the world was divided into those whose pee stank after eating asparagus and those whose didn't. Then in 1980, a study complicated matters: Subjects whose pee stank sniffed the urine of subjects whose pee didn't. Guess what? The pee stank. It turns out we're not only divided by the ability to produce odorous asparagus pee, but the ability to smell it.

An anosmia—an inability to perceive a smell—keeps certain people from smelling the compounds that make up even the most offensive asparagus pee, and like the stinky pee non-producers, they're in the majority.

Producing and perceiving asparagus pee don't go hand-in-hand, either. The 1980 study found that some people who don't produce stinky pee could detect the rotten cabbage smell in another person's urine. On the flip side, some stink producers aren't able to pick up the scent in their own urine or the urine of others.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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15 Rich Facts About Fudge
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You probably know the basics about this decadent dessert: It's rich, it's creamy, and it comes in a variety of mouth-watering flavors. (Red velvet cake batter fudge? Yes please!) But there is plenty more fun trivia to digest. In honor of National Fudge Day, we’re serving up the sweetest morsels.

1. WHEN THE DESSERT WAS INVENTED, IT CHANGED THE PREVIOUS MEANING OF FUDGE.

In the late 17th century, fudge was a verb meaning "to fit together or adjust [clumsily]." Then around 1800, the word was used to mean a hoax or cheat. By mid-century, the use of the term “Oh, fudge!” as a kid-friendly expletive had come into favor, and was often used when something had been messed up. It’s believed that the first batch of fudge was created when someone was trying to make caramels and “fudged” up. The name stuck.

2. IT HAS STRONG TIES TO BALTIMORE.

The earliest origin story for fudge dates back to 1921, when Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a former Vassar student, wrote a letter describing her introduction to the treat. She claims that while attending classes in 1886, a classmate's cousin living in Baltimore made the dessert, and this was her first knowledge of it. She also mentions a grocery store, probably in Baltimore, that sold fudge for 40 cents a pound.

3. THE TREAT BECAME WILDLY POPULAR AT VASSAR.

Two years after discovering fudge, Battersby Hartridge got ahold of the recipe and made 30 pounds of it for the Vassar Senior Auction. In Vassar, The Alumnae/i Quarterly, they claim the sweet became so favored that “students would make it in the middle of the night, dangerously diverting the gas from their lamps for the task.”

4. STILL, IT TOOK A WHILE FOR COMPANIES TO MASS-PRODUCE IT.

Skuse’s Complete Confectioner was known as a guide for all things dessert—but the first editions of the book, printed in the late 1800s, didn’t include any recipes for fudge. In later editions, they made up for lost time, including recipes for rainbow fudge (food colorings), Mexican fudge (raisins, nuts, and coconut), maple fudge, and three types of chocolate fudge.

5. AMERICANS MAY HAVE STOLEN THE CONCEPT FROM THE SCOTS.

Fudge is thought to be a descendent of tablet—a medium-hard confection from Scotland. The two treats use similar ingredients, but fudge is richer, softer, and slightly less grainy than its European cousin.

6. THERE'S A WORLD RECORD FOR THE LARGEST SLAB.

The 5760-pound behemoth was crafted at the Northwest Fudge Factory in Ontario, Canada in 2010. It reportedly took a full week to make, and while ingredients aren't available for this record, the previous record holder contained 705 pounds of butter, 2800 pounds of chocolate, and 305 gallons of condensed milk.

7. MAKING FUDGE TAKES SOME SCIENCE.

Early fudge recipes were prone to disaster, with one 1902 magazine explaining "fudge is one of the most difficult confections to make properly." With candy thermometers not becoming commonplace for several years, most recipes required boiling and hoping for the best. Eventually more foolproof recipes were created that included corn syrup (which helps prevent the crystallization that can result in a gritty texture) and condensed milk or marshmallow crème.

8. IT'S NOT ALL THAT DIFFERENT THAN FONDANT.

Fudge is actually a drier version of fondant—not the stiff, malleable kind so often seen on cake decorating shows, but the kind found in candies like peppermint patties and cherry cordials. 

9. A TINY ISLAND IN MICHIGAN CONSIDERS ITSELF THE FUDGE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD.

There are upwards of a dozen fudge shops on 4.35-square mile Mackinac Island in northern Michigan. (Permanent population on the tourist destination: just shy of 500, per the 2010 census.) The oldest candy shop on the island, Murdick’s Candy Kitchen, opened in 1887, while May's Candy claims to be the oldest fudge shop.

10. MACKINAC ISLAND CRANKS OUT OVER 10,000 POUNDS OF FUDGE DAILY DURING PEAK SEASON.

For production, fudge makers ship in about 10 tons of sugar each week and roughly 10 tons of butter each year. Every August, the island hosts the Mackinac Island Fudge Festival, complete with events like Fudge on the Rocks, where local bartenders craft fudge-y libations.

11. FIRST LADY MAMIE EISENHOWER WAS A HUGE FUDGE FAN.

She even crafted her own recipe—named Mamie’s Million-Dollar Fudge—which her husband, Ike, quite liked. It included chopped nuts and marshmallow crème.

12. THE HOT FUDGE SUNDAE WAS CREATED IN HOLLYWOOD.

C.C. Brown’s, an iconic ice cream parlor on Hollywood Boulevard, was credited for dreaming up the idea to drizzle melted fudge over ice cream in 1906 (earlier sundaes had other syrups, like cherry). Sadly, the shop closed in 1996, but the treat remains popular.

13. THE BRITS HAD A SWEET NAME FOR FUDGE.

A description of fudge, found in the 1920 tome Harmsworth’s Household Encyclopedia, read, “A sweetmeat that hails from America, but is now popular in other countries.” (To be fair, in the UK the term "sweetmeat” is applied to a variety of sweet treats.)

14. AT ONE POINT, YOU COULD BUY A LIFETIME SUPPLY OF FUDGE.

Harry Ryba, known as the fudge king of Mackinac Island, once offered to mail out a lifetime supply of the candy—three pounds a month—to any customer willing to pay $2250 upfront. “A lifetime, being yours or mine, whichever ends sooner,” he said, per The New York Times. Not a bad deal, considering he passed away at age 88.

15. FUDGE CAN KEEP FOR A LONG TIME.

Airtight packages of the confection can be frozen and stored up to a year without losing any flavor, which means that you can feel free to give in to temptation and buy a larger chunk while on vacation this year. And about that lifetime supply…

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