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Oregon Trail Is Now a Card Game

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First released in 1971, popular video game Oregon Trail has taught generations of children about pioneer life on the famed trail that connected Missouri to Oregon. Now, 45 years later, Oregon Trail has reportedly made its way from the computer screen to the table top.

The Oregon Trail Card Game, a card and dice game based on the classic computer game from Pressman Toy Company, will be released exclusively in Target stores in the future, according to Polygon. The two- to six-player games features supply cards for 200 pounds of food, clean water, 100 bullets, clothes, medicine, and oxen to start. As the gameplay goes on, the players (ages 12 and up) draw cards that tell them about their progress or the random hardships they’ll face throughout their journey to the Beaver State.

There are also trail cards for towns and forts so players can pick up additional supplies, along with calamity cards, such as snake bites, broken wagon axles, extreme cold, and death from typhoid or dysentery. Along the way, pioneers slowly die off until the last ones in the party make it to the end of the trail to win the game. The game even comes with gravestones, so players can write down their names and how they died on their final resting place.

Right now, there is no word on an exact release date.

[h/t Polygon]

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New AI-Driven Music System Analyzes Tracks for Perfect Playlists
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Whether you're planning a bachelorette party or recovering from a breakup, a well-curated playlist makes all the difference. If you don't have time to pick the perfect songs manually, services that use the AI-driven system Sonic Style may be able to figure out exactly what you have in mind based on your request.

According to Fast Company, Sonic Style is the new music-categorizing service from the media and entertainment data provider Gracenote. There are plenty of music algorithms out there already, but Sonic Style works a little differently. Rather than listing the entire discography of a certain artist under a single genre, the AI analyzes individual tracks. It considers factors like the artist's typical genre and the era the song was recorded in, as well as qualities it can only learn through listening, like tempo and mood. Based on nearly 450 descriptors, it creates a super-accurate "style profile" of the track that makes it easier for listeners to find it when searching for the perfect song to fit an occasion.

Playlists that use data from Sonic Style feel like they were made by a person with a deep knowledge of music rather than a machine. That's thanks to the system's advanced neural network. It also recognizes artists that don't fit neatly into one genre, or that have evolved into a completely different music style over their careers. Any service—including music-streaming platforms and voice-activated assistants—that uses Gracenote's data will be able to take advantage of the new technology.

With AI at your disposal, all you have to do as the listener is decide on a style of music. Here are some ideas to get you started if you want a playlist for productivity.

[h/t Fast Company]

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