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27 Hilariously Nasty Sounding Mushroom Species Names

JerzyOpiołaWikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Mushroom hunters and the authors of field guides have long come up with names that reference various characteristics of color, texture, shape, and smell using English or Latin. Some are strictly practical, but others are a little ... stranger. For example, way back in 1753, the mushroom pictured above was assigned the scientific name Phallus impudicus. Its common name is the shameless stinkhorn.

Mushrooms have a certain … suggestiveness about them that has long been noticed and acknowledged by those who study them, and there’s something about looking through a whole list of them together that cannot help but conjure up the most disgusting mycological orgy you never even knew could be imagined. I made the mistake of casually flipping through Eyewitness Handbooks: Mushrooms, and now, since I cannot bear the weight of this alone, I offer you these 27 other hilariously nasty sounding mushroom species names from the book.

1. BREAD DOUGH CLITOPILUS

Archenzo, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0 

Scientific name: Clitopilus prunulus

2. EURO SLIMY LACTARIUS

Jean-Pol Grandmont, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.5

Scientific name: Lactarius blennius

3. PUNGENT FALSE BLEWIT

Scientific name: Lepista irina

4. YELLOW-STAINING TRICH

Stribilomyces, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Scientific name: Tricholoma scalpturatum

5. DIRTY TRICH COMPLEX

Scientific name: Tricholoma atrosquamosum

6. PURPLISH ENTOLOMA

Scientific name: Entoloma porphyrophaeum

7. SHEATHED CORT

Scientific name: Cortinarius torvus

8. DRY SCALY PHOLIOTA

Scientific name: Pholiota squarrosa

9. FRECKLE-GILLED GYM

Scientific name: Gymnopilus penetrans

10. COMMON STUMP PSATHYRELLA

Scientific name: Psathyrella piluliformis

11. COMMON RINGED PANAEOLIS

Scientific name: Panaeolus semiovatus

12. EURO SPINDLE-SHANK COLLYBIA

Scientific name: Collybia fusipes

13. FETID RUSSULA

Scientific name: Russula foetens

14. TINY ORANGE-CAP MYCENA

Scott Darbey, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Sceintific name: Mycena acicula

15. STOUT-STALKED AMANITA

Scientific name: Amanita spissa

16. COCKLESHELL LENTINELLUS

Scientific name: Lentinellus cochleatus

17. EARTH-BALL BOLETE

Scientific name: Boletus parasiticus

18. YELLOW-PORED SCABER-STALK

Scientific name: Leccinum crocipodium

19. TINDER POLYPORE

Scientific name: Fomes fomentarius

20. TREMBLING PHILEBIA

Scientific name: Phlebia tremellosa

21. HAIRY STEREUM

Scientific name: Stereum hirsutum

22. RIGID LEATHER BRACKET

Scientific name: Hymenochaete rubiginosa

23. TOOTHED JELLY

Scientific name: Pseudohydnum gelatinosum

24. SCALY EARTH-TONGUE ASCO

Scientific name: Geoglossum fallax

25. CRAMP BALLS ASCO

Tony Hisgett, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Scientific name: Daldinia concentrica

26. PUFFBALL-IN-ASPIC

Scientific name: Calostoma cinnabarina

27. BROWN LEAFY JELLY

Scientific name: Tremella foliacea

Banner image courtesy of iStock.

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Afternoon Map
Monthly Internet Costs in Every Country

Thanks to the internet, people around the world can conduct global research, trade tips, and find faraway friends without ever leaving their couch. Not everyone pays the same price for these digital privileges, though, according to new data visualizations spotted by Thrillist.

To compare internet user prices in each country, cost information site HowMuch.net created a series of maps. The data comes courtesy of English market research consultancy BDRC and Cable.co.uk, which teamed up to analyze 3351 broadband packages in 196 nations between August 18, 2017 and October 12, 2017.

In the U.S., for example, the average cost for internet service is $66 per month. That’s substantially more than what browsers pay in neighboring Mexico ($27) and Canada ($55). Still, we don’t have it bad compared to either Namibia or Burkina Faso, where users shell out a staggering $464 and $924, respectively, for monthly broadband access. In fact, internet in the U.S. is far cheaper than what residents in 113 countries pay, including those in Saudi Arabia ($84), Indonesia ($72), and Greenland ($84).

On average, internet costs in Asia and Russia tend to be among the lowest, while access is prohibitively expensive in sub-Saharan Africa and in certain parts of Oceania. As for the world’s cheapest internet, you’ll find it in Ukraine and Iran.

Check out the maps below for more broadband insights, or view HowMuch.net’s full findings here.

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

[h/t Thrillist]

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Can You Figure Out Why the Turtles Bulge in This Optical Illusion?
iStock
iStock

Ready for a little vision test? Akiyoshi Kitaoka, a Kyoto-based psychologist who studies visual illusions, created this eye-bending image that appears to bulge and bend. In the image, shared on Syfy.com, the horizontal and vertical lines actually run straight across and down, but they look like they ripple, and the shapes (Kitaoka calls them turtles) look like they’re different shades of gray, even though they’re an identical color.

As Phil Plait explains for Syfy, the key is in the corners—the turtle “legs,” if you will. “At each vertex between turtles, they form a rotated square divided into four smaller squares," he writes. "Note how they're offset from one another, giving a twist to the vertices.” If you zoom in closely on the image, the lines begin to straighten out.

The difference in the colors, meanwhile, is a result of the contrast between the black and white pixels outlining the turtles. If the outlines of the turtles were entirely black or entirely white, instead of a combination, the grays would look identical. But the contrast between the two fools your eyes into thinking they're different.

To see more of Kitaoka’s illusion art, you can follow him on Twitter @AkiyoshiKitaoka. Then, go check out these other amazing optical illusions.

[h/t Syfy]

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