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15 Facts About Wedding Crashers

In 2005's Wedding Crashers, Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn play John and Jeremy, two divorce mediators who crash weddings to meet women. The romcom/bromance flick also stars Christopher Walken, Rachel McAdams, Isla Fisher, Bradley Cooper, and Will Ferrell in a memorable cameo role. Here are some facts about the movie to read before you get the meatloaf.

1. IT REALLY ALL STARTED WITH A WEDDING INVITATION.

Producer Andrew Panay (Serendipity, Van Wilder: Party Liason) received an invitation to a friend's wedding, triggering memories of his college days when he and his friend used to crash weddings. Panay developed the concept with his partners at their production company before hiring Steve Faber and Bob Fisher to write the screenplay. Panay met Faber and Fisher when they were shopping their script We're the Millers (2013). It was the writers that came up with the idea for one of the crashers to fall for a woman at one of the weddings.

2. IT WAS ORIGINALLY WRITTEN TO BE SET IN BOSTON AND CAPE COD.

But producer Peter Abrams knew it would be too cold to shoot in Boston or Cape Cod in March and April, so director David Dobkin (Shanghai Knights) suggested Washington D.C., where he grew up. The director added moments from his earlier days into the movie. “Many times in my youth I sat on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial finishing off a long night with a bottle of champagne or wine as the sun was about to rise over the Washington Monument,” Dobkin reminisced.

3. OWEN WILSON WASN'T COMFORTABLE WITH THE ORIGINAL SCRIPT, SO HE AND VAUGHN CHANGED MOST OF IT.

“When I first read the script, I wasn’t comfortable. It was a funny concept and story, but part felt corny," the star told New York magazine in 2005. Wilson, Vaughn, and the writers changed the arc of Jeremy's romance, and got rid of a "Graduate-like" wedding scene with John and Claire (Rachel McAdams).

4. JANE SEYMOUR BEAT OUT RAQUEL WELCH TO PLAY KATHLEEN.

Seymour had auditioned for the first time in 30 years to win the part over the likes of Welch. She said the script was the "funniest thing" she had ever read. Seymour, who was 54 at the time, also took part in her first ever topless scene for the movie.

5. HUNDREDS OF ACTRESSES AUDITIONED BEFORE RACHEL MCADAMS READ FOR CLAIRE.

Dobkin claimed he was one hour from going to the studio to present his top two choices when McAdams arrived in his office. “I was really surprised to get the part because it all happened so fast,” McAdams said.

6. ISLA FISHER WATCHED FATAL ATTRACTION AND THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE CRADLE BEFORE HER AUDITION FOR GLORIA.

It helped her think about how to make someone "really psycho and funny and aggressive and sexual, but also make her sweet enough that you still like her and think that she's endearing in some way." She also used a friend's "crazy eye" and a "really bad" laugh to get the gig.

7. THE FIRST WEEK OF SHOOTING WAS THE OPENING MONTAGE OF ALL THE DIFFERENT WEDDINGS.

All five of them, as principal photography began on March 22, 2004. McAdams's first scene was dancing with noted mover-shaker Christopher Walken. “My first scene was dancing with Christopher Walken—no pressure, right?” she said. “I had been practicing with a choreographer during pre-production because I knew he was a really good dancer, but it was so nerve-racking on the day because I assumed there would be a whole bunch of people dancing and it turned out to be a whole ballroom full of people watching us dance the polka. I did encourage him to do some solo work and he broke out a few times, which made it a lot of fun for me.”

8. A WEDDING CONSULTANT WAS HIRED FOR AUTHENTICITY.

Wedding planner Lovelynn Vanderhorst was hired as a technical advisor to ensure accuracy. She admitted in the movie's official production notes how hard it was to stop people from crashing real weddings. “The hard part for me is usually a client will say, ‘I don’t know who that person is, can you go find out?’ Usually they’re not invited and I have to ask them to leave. But at one wedding, it ended up being the groom’s uncle and the bride was really embarrassed. That’s why, I hate to admit it, but it wouldn’t be as hard as you think to crash a wedding.”

9. OWEN WILSON CAME UP WITH THE '10 PERCENT OF OUR HEARTS' LINE.

"You know how they say we only use 10 percent of our brains? I think we only use 10 percent of our hearts" came to Wilson after the whole sequence was finished. “At about the same age as I was interested in petrified wood, I was just fascinated with this dumb idea that we only used 10 percent of our brains," Wilson explained about the thought process. "I was always thinking, 'Man, if I could only use 20…'". Wilson told Dobkin his idea, and Dobkin made a last-second setup to shoot the scene again.

According to Jane Seymour, Wilson also came up with the idea for her character to call him a "pervert" at the end of her seduction scene. Wilson also added to the two rules mentioned in the original script. "...I noticed over the course of the movie that whenever Vince was on one of his rants, he would throw in rules to support whatever argument he had," Owen told IGN. "And so I started to figure that out and I started to throw my own rules into the mix. And eventually it got to rule 87: Don't quote a rule to another. Don't go throwing rules in another wedding crasher's face."

10. MCADAMS LISTENED TO FLEETWOOD MAC BEFORE EMOTIONAL SCENES.

She played "Landslide" on her iPod to prepare. Wilson and Vaughn heard and sang it, straight-faced, before Jeremy and Gloria's wedding scene. McAdams said, "It totally took me out! But whatever works."

11. THEY MADE FAKE PURPLE HEARTS AVAILABLE FOR PRINTING ON THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE.

After some complaints from a congressman, producers took it down. “If any movie-goers take the advice of the ‘Wedding Crashers’ and try to use fake Purple Hearts to get girls, they may wind up picking up an FBI agent instead,” said Rep. John Salazar, D-Colorado.

12. JOHN MCCAIN GOT IN TROUBLE FOR HIS BRIEF CAMEO.

McCain and James Carville appeared briefly in the first Cleary wedding. He donated the $695 salary to charity, and his aides claimed he had "little idea" of what the film would be like when he agreed to make his cameo. McCain, who was awarded an actual Purple Heart, didn't comment on the Purple Heart controversy, but commented on the criticism he got for appearing in an R-rated film after earlier hosting congressional hearings that criticized Hollywood for marketing R-rated movies to kids. "In Washington, I work with boobs every day," the senator joked on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.

13. IT CHANGED BRADLEY COOPER'S CAREER.

Cooper (Sack) said as much on his Inside the Actors Studio appearance. “On Alias, I played the nicest guy in the world and then I would try to audition for movies after that and the feedback was like ‘Wow, Bradley’s such a nice guy,’ ‘Yeah, I don’t really see him in that part,’ and after Wedding Crashers, ‘Bradley? Yeah, he’s an a**hole.'”

14. NO, VINCE VAUGHN DOESN'T HAVE THAT PAINTING OF JEREMY MADE BY TODD.

"I'm not sure where that painting is. But it will always be in my heart," Vaughn wrote in a Reddit AMA in 2013, despite it being claimed elsewhere on the internet that Vaughn had kept it. He also said the running gag of his character getting referred to as "baba ghanoush" stemmed from an inside joke.

15. THERE WAS BRIEF TALK OF A SEQUEL.

Vaughn, Wilson, and David Dobkin came up with an idea where John and Jeremy would compete with an "ultimate wedding crasher" played by Daniel Craig. But nothing came of it. "Wedding Crashers came out at a time when people weren’t doing lots of sequels," Dobkin explained.

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7 Things You Might Not Know About Audrey Hepburn
Hulton Archive, Getty Images
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

Though she’ll always be known as the little-black-dress-wearing big-screen incarnation of Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, there’s probably a lot you don’t know about Audrey Hepburn, who passed away in Switzerland on January 20, 1993.

1. HER FIRST ROLE WAS IN AN EDUCATIONAL FILM.

Though 1948’s Dutch in Seven Lessons is classified as a “documentary” on IMDb, it’s really more of an educational travel film, in which Hepburn appears as an airline attendant. If you don’t speak Dutch, it might not make a whole lot of sense to you, but you can watch it above anyway.

2. GREGORY PECK WAS AFRAID SHE’D MAKE HIM LOOK LIKE A JERK.

Hepburn was an unknown actress when she was handed the starring role of Princess Ann opposite Gregory Peck in 1953’s Roman Holiday. As such, Peck was going to be the only star listed, with Hepburn relegated to a smaller font and an “introducing” credit. But Peck insisted, “You've got to change that because she'll be a big star and I'll look like a big jerk.” Hepburn ended up winning her first and only Oscar for the role (Peck wasn’t even nominated).

3. SHE’S AN EGOT.

In 1954, the same year she won the Oscar for Roman Holiday, Hepburn accepted a Tony Award for her title role in Ondine on Broadway. Hepburn is one of only 12 EGOTs, meaning that she has won all of the four major creative awards: an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony. Unfortunately, the honor came to Hepburn posthumously; her 1994 Grammy for the children’s album Audrey Hepburn’s Enchanted Tales and her 1993 Emmy for Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn were both awarded following her passing in early 1993.

4. TRUMAN CAPOTE HATED HER AS HOLLY GOLIGHTLY.

Blake Edwards’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s may be one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history, but it’s a miracle that the film ever got made at all. Particularly if you listened to Truman Capote, who wrote the novella upon which it was based, and saw only one actress in the lead: Marilyn Monroe. When asked what he thought was wrong with the film, which downplayed the more tawdry aspects of the fact that Ms. Golightly makes her living as a call girl (Hepburn had told the producers, “I can’t play a hooker”), Capote replied, “Oh, God, just everything. It was the most miscast film I’ve ever seen. It made me want to throw up.”

5. HOLLY GOLIGHTLY’S LITTLE BLACK DRESS SOLD FOR NEARLY $1 MILLION.

Audrey Hepburn in 'Breakfast at Tiffany's'
Keystone Features, Getty Images

In 2006, Christie’s auctioned off the iconic Givenchy-designed little black dress that Hepburn wore in Breakfast at Tiffany’s for a whopping $923,187 (pre-auction numbers estimated that it would go for between $98,800 and $138,320). It was a record-setting amount at the time, until Marilyn Monroe’s white “subway dress” from The Seven Year Itch sold for $5.6 million in 2006.

6. SHE SANG “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” TO JFK IN 1963.

One year after Marilyn Monroe’s sultry birthday serenade to John F. Kennedy in 1962, Hepburn paid a musical tribute to the President at a private party in 1963, on what would be his final birthday.

7. THERE’S A RARE TULIP NAMED AFTER HER.

Photo of Audrey Hepburn
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

In 1990, a rare white tulip hybrid was named after the actress and humanitarian, and dedicated to her at her family’s former estate in Holland.

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Why the Film You're Watching on HBO Might Not Be the Whole Movie
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iStock

In the days before widescreen televisions, most of the movies you watched on VHS or on cable looked a little different than their big-screen versions. The sides of the image had to be cropped out so that you could watch a movie made for a rectangular screen on the small screen. Today, those little black bars on the top and bottom of the screen that allow you to watch the same movie scaled to any shape of screen are everywhere. But it turns out, cropping for aspect ratios is alive and well—on HBO, as YouTube film vlogger Patrick Willems explains.

In his latest video, which we spotted on Digg, Willems explains why aspect ratios matter, and how the commonly used aspect ratios can fundamentally change a movie.

Most old-school televisions have 4:3 aspect ratios, meaning movies had to be significantly cropped to fit wide-screen films on the small screen. Now, most computers and televisions use 16:9 aspect ratios, which is approximately the same as the one used for movies, typically 1.85:1, so many movies expand to fit TV screens perfectly. The catch: Some Hollywood movies are shot with even wider angles to show even more of an image at once. And even though viewers are familiar with the sight of those black bars, it seems the streaming sites are determined to limit their use, even for movies that don’t fit on a normal screen. As a result, you may only be seeing the central part of the image, not the whole thing. You could be missing characters, action, and landscape that’s happening on the far sides of the screen.

Since 1993, the Motion Picture Association of America has mandated that any film that’s been altered in a way that changes the original vision of its creators—say, to edit out swear words, adjust the run time, or to make it fit a certain screen—run with a disclaimer that says as much. That’s why before movies run on TV, they usually show a note that says something like “This film has been modified from its original version. It has been formatted to fit this screen.” But this doesn’t seem to apply to streaming.

In 2013, Netflix was accused of cropping films, too, showing wide-angle movies to fit the standard 16:9 screen instead of running the original version with black bars. The streaming giant claimed it was a mistake due to distributors sending them the cropped version, and those films would be replaced with the originals. However, as of 2015, users were still complaining of the problem. According to Willems, it’s a problem that still plagues not just HBO, but Starz and Hulu, too, and there isn’t any clear rationale for it other than that perhaps people don’t like looking at black bars. But frankly, that seems better than seeing a version of a film that the director never intended.

You can get all the details in the video below:

[h/t Digg]

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