CLOSE
YouTube // Techmoan
YouTube // Techmoan

Recording on Wire

YouTube // Techmoan
YouTube // Techmoan

In the 1940s, a popular audio recording medium was metal wire. Hair-thin wires on spools performed like super-skinny reel-to-reel tape—before tape existed. Wire recorders became popular overnight, but faded out just as quickly. What happened?

In this deep dive, YouTuber Techmoan digs into the history of the wire recorder—with one brief interruption for a period-appropriate cigarette ad. If you're curious about WWII-era recording tech, check this out:

If you'd like to read more on wire recorders, check out this nine-part history.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Cahoots Malone
arrow
fun
Revisit Your Favorite '90s Screensaver With This Free Game
Cahoots Malone
Cahoots Malone

In the '90s, a significant amount of computing power was devoted to generating endless brick mazes on Windows 95. The screensaver has since become iconic, and now nostalgic Microsoft fans can relive it in a whole new way. As Motherboard reports, the animation has been re-imagined into a video game called Screensaver Subterfuge.

Instead of watching passively as your computer weaves through the maze, you’re leading the journey this time around. You play as a kid hacker who’s been charged with retrieving sensitive data hidden in the screensaver of Windows 95 before devious infomancers can get to it first. The gameplay is pretty simple: Use the arrow keys to navigate the halls and press Q and click the mouse to change their design. Finding a giant smiley face takes you to level two, and finding the briefcase icon ends the game. There are also lots of giant rats in this version of the screensaver.

Screensaver Subterfuge was designed by Cahoots Malone as part of the PROCJAM 2017 generative software showcase. You can download it for free for Windows, macOS, and Linux from his website, or if playing a game sounds like too much work, you can always watch videos of the old screensaver on a loop.

[h/t Motherboard]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Faruk Ateş, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
arrow
technology
How a Wall of Lava Lamps Makes the Web a Safer Place
Faruk Ateş, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Faruk Ateş, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

A secure internet network relies on bits of data that hackers can’t predict: in other words, random numbers. Randomization is an essential part of every encryption service, but spitting out a meaningless stream of digits isn't as easy as it sounds. Computerized random number generators depend on code, which means it's possible for outside forces to anticipate their output. So instead of turning to high-tech algorithms, one digital security service takes a retro approach to the problem.

As YouTube personality Tom Scott reports in a recent video, the San Francisco headquarters of Cloudflare is home to a wall of lava lamps. Those groovy accessories play a crucial role when it comes to protecting web activity. The floating, liquid wax inside each of them dictates the numbers that make up encryption codes. Cloudflare collects this data by filming the lamps from a wall-mounted camera.

Unlike computer programs, lava lamps act in a way that's impossible to predict. They're not the only secure way to generate randomness (tools used by other Cloudflare offices include a "chaotic pendulum" and a radioactive source), but they may be the prettiest to look at.

[h/t Tom Scott]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios