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Insulated Tents Could Protect the Homeless From the Elements

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Being homeless often means exposure to all the elements, from the glaring sun of a heat wave to the freezing winds of a winter storm. A Singapore-based nonprofit called billionBricks wants to protect people without homes from the risks of extreme weather with a heavily insulated tent that can be assembled easily in cities, as featured on Mashable recently.

The winterHyde tent was first developed after riots in the Indian city of Muzaffarnagar forced 43,000 people out of their homes in 2013. It’s designed with a reflective inner layer to stay comfortable in temperatures down to 32°F, with a highly visible, waterproof outer layer and a sand-weighted frame that stays put without anchoring. In the summer, the tent can be reversed so that the reflective layer keeps out the heat rather than trapping it inside, and there are ventilation flaps to let a breeze through.

The tents are currently built to house families of up to five, but a recent pilot in New Delhi has the company considering even bigger shelters. Some of the 12 families who used the tents had up to seven people sleeping inside. The pilot users also suggested that the tents come with built-in lighting, an idea that might be included in the next iteration of the design.

While the winterHyde tents were originally conceived as emergency shelters, there are plenty of people who are interested in using them as long-term housing. In Mumbai, a 2011 census found that at least 57,400 people lived in structures without roofs. Since the tents are only designed to be comfortable in above-freezing temperatures, it wouldn’t be the perfect solution for sheltering people who live in, say, Chicago or Moscow, but could potentially be an option for areas in Southeast Asia—where billionBricks wants to donate 1000 tents to needy families this year—or for relatively mild climates like California.

The tents can be purchased for a family in need for $199, and the company also accepts orders for individuals and organizations through a contact form on their site.

[h/t Mashable]

All images courtesy billionBricks

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Pop Culture
IKEA Publishes Instructions for Turning Rugs Into Game of Thrones Capes
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HBO

Game of Thrones is one of the most expensive TV shows ever produced, but even the crew of the hit HBO series isn’t above using an humble IKEA hack behind the scenes. According to Mashable, the fur capes won by Jon Snow and other members of the Night’s Watch on the show are actually sheepskin rugs sold by the home goods chain.

The story behind the iconic garment was first revealed by head costume designer Michele Clapton at a presentation at Los Angeles’s Getty Museum in 2016. “[It’s] a bit of a trick,” she said at Designing the Middle Ages: The Costumes of GoT. “We take anything we can.”

Not one to dissuade customers from modifying its products, IKEA recently released a cape-making guide in the style of its visual furniture assembly instructions. To start you’ll need one of their Skold rugs, which can be bought online for $79. Using a pair of scissors cut a slit in the material and make a hole where your head will go. Slip it on and you’ll look ready for your Game of Thrones debut.

The costume team makes a few more changes to the rugs used on screen, like shaving them, adding leather straps, and waxing and “frosting” the fur to give it a weather-worn effect. Modern elements are used to make a variety of the medieval props used in Game of Thrones. The swords, for example, are made from aircraft aluminum, not steel. For more production design insights, check out these behind-the-scenes secrets of Game of Thrones weapons artists.

[h/t Mashable]

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Pop Culture
Prince Is Getting His Own Pantone Color: Love Symbol #2
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Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

Prince was music royalty, so it only makes sense that purple—the hue traditionally favored by monarchs—was his signature color. To memorialize the late singer/songwriter, who died in April 2016, the Pantone Color Institute and the Prince Estate have collaborated on a custom shade of dark purple to represent the High Priest of Pop.

Pantone

Called Love Symbol #2, "the color was inspired by Prince’s custom-made Yamaha piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57," Pantone stated in a press release. "The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion, and culture."

Thanks to the 1984 film Purple Rain and its Oscar-winning music, Prince has long been associated with royal hue. Now, “while the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the 'Purple One,' Love Symbol #2 will be the official color across the brand he left behind,” according to Pantone.

We couldn’t think of a better way to celebrate the Funky One’s flamboyant legacy.

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