CLOSE
YouTube // British Pathé
YouTube // British Pathé

Douglas Corrigan 'Accidentally' Flew to Ireland Today in 1938

YouTube // British Pathé
YouTube // British Pathé

American aviator Douglas Corrigan earned the nickname "Wrong Way" on July 17, 1938, when he filed a flight plan from Brooklyn to Long Beach, California...but ended up in Ireland.

"Wrong Way" Corrigan eventually returned to the U.S., went in front of news cameras and admitted his "mistake" while grinning broadly. But of course, he knew what he was doing all along—and his flight was a daring feat. Corrigan had modified his plane for the intercontinental flight, using knowledge he picked up while helping build Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St Louis a decade earlier. Corrigan had been denied permission once before to fly from New York to Ireland, so his "mistake" was a clever (albeit dangerous and illegal) way to make the journey.

Corrigan made the flight in a plane he called Sunshine. The plane had a leaking gas tank, no radio, and no parachute. He carried "a couple boxes of fig bar cookies" and some gum for sustenance. The flight lasted 28 hours. After his arrival near Dublin, his pilot's license was suspended...but only for a few weeks.

Upon Corrigan's return to the States, the New York Post printed a giant headline backwards, declaring: "HAIL WRONG WAY CORRIGAN." A more legible right-way subhead read: "MILLION CHEER MADLY IN WELCOME TO FLYER." Corrigan became a minor American hero, endorsing "Wrong Way" products, writing a memoir, and starring as himself in the movie The Flying Irishman. Here's Corrigan the year after his famous flight, arriving in Newark to cheering crowds:

Corrigan appeared on TV's To Tell the Truth 19 years after his flight. In the clip below, he shows up around the 16:50 mark.

Douglas Corrigan lived in California until his death in 1995. All hail Wrong Way Corrigan!

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Food
United Airlines Has Gotten Rid of Tomato Juice, and Customers Are Freaking Out
iStock
iStock

Lovers of tomato juice are a small camp, but a vocal one. And they're furious that United Airlines has replaced their beloved Mott's tomato juice with Mr. and Mrs. T Bloody Mary Mix on all flights under four hours, which includes most of its domestic runs. United said these changes are part of efforts to “streamline” its food service, the Chicago Business Journal reports.

The stealth substitution has fueled a rebellion among loyal tomato juice fans, as The Week points out.

There is some truth to the claim that tomato juice tastes better on flights. One study revealed that the noise level on an airplane affects our perception of taste, making savory or umami flavors more delicious. Another industry-funded study said the air pressure and humidity levels make bolder drinks seem more appealing.

Premium and economy passengers flying United can also say goodbye to Sprite Zero, Jim Beam, Courvoisier, and Amaretto, which were cut from the menu. And although airlines are not exactly known for their cuisine to begin with, passengers will likely start to see a difference in the types of meals being offered. The Chicago Business Journal writes:

"The reduction in food being offered in many instances in first-class and business-class cabins is not insignificant. Hot breakfasts are being replaced on some routes with only fruit plates and muffins, and more substantial lunches are being switched out for wraps and chocolate slabs."

The airline has said it is "monitoring customer feedback."

[h/t The Week]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
This Travel Site Factors in Baggage Fees to Show You the True Cost of Your Flight
iStock
iStock

If you're looking to find the best deal on airfare, there are more tools out there to help you than ever before. Travel sites allow users to compare ticket prices based on airlines and the dates of their trip, but the numbers they show don't always paint the full picture. Additional fees for baggage can make a flight that seemed like a steal at booking suddenly a lot less convenient. Fortunately for frugal flyers, KAYAK has found a way to work this factor into their equations, Travel + Leisure reports.

To use the fare search engine's new baggage fee feature, start by entering the information for your flight like you normally would. Flying from New York to Chicago and back the first week of May? KAYAK recommends taking Spirit Airlines if you're looking to pay as little as possible.

But let's say you plan on checking two bags on your flight—different airlines charge different baggage fees, so Spirit may no longer be the cheapest option. If that's the case, KAYAK includes a Fee Assistant bar right above the search results. After entering the number of carry-on and checked bags you'll be traveling with, the results will automatically update to show the true cost of your fare. Ticket prices for New York to Chicago rise across the board with the addition of two checked bags, and Delta now becomes the best deal if you're looking to book through one airline.

The new baggage fee assistant is one way for travelers to make savvier purchases when booking online. But even with the added fees included, you'll need to do some extra research to determine the true value you get from each ticket price that pops up. Wi-Fi, legroom, and in-flight meal quality are all factors that could make a slightly more expensive airline worth it once you board.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios