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10 Royal Facts About Babar the Elephant

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From a bedtime story shared between a mother and her sons to a children’s series that has sold over 10.1 million copies in the U.S., Babar and his adventures have captivated children for generations. Learn more about the French pachyderm king with the following facts.

1. THE BOOK SERIES IS WRITTEN BY TWO AUTHORS: A FATHER AND HIS SON.

Jean de Brunhoff was working as a painter in France when his two sons brought to him a story of a resilient elephant who runs away to the city after his mother is shot by a hunter. Jean published The Story of Babar in 1931 and wrote seven books about the elephant. His son, Laurent de Brunhoff, eventually took over the family character after his father’s death—even when his mother said there would never be another Babar book—and published an additional 35 Babar books.

2. THE CHARACTER WAS CREATED BY THE MATRIARCH OF THE DE BRUNHOFF FAMILY.

To distract his younger brother, Mathieu, from a stomach ache, de Brunhoff’s mother, Cecile, made up the story that would eventually become Babar. She later would refuse to add her name as an author on the stories. De Brunhoff says he has no memory of hearing the first story, but remembers watching his father paint the elephant (Jean is credited with adding Babar’s bowler hat and bright green suit). It was de Brunhoff’s uncles who convinced his father that Babar’s story could appeal to a wider audience.

3. THE DEATH OF BABAR’S MOTHER WAS INSPIRED BY A FAMILY MEMBER’S SAFARI.

De Brunhoff had family in both Africa and France, including a distant relation, Giselle Bunau-Varilla, who lived in Kenya. While on safari, Bunau-Varilla shot an elephant, but after Bunau-Varilla found out soon after that she was pregnant, she vowed never to hunt an elephant again. The branch of the family instead focused on conservation work and Bunau-Varilla’s daughter eventually worked for Save the Elephants.

4. DE BRUNHOFF TOOK OVER THE JOB OF COLORING THE PROOFS FOR THE BABAR STORIES WHEN HE WAS 13.

When Jean died of tuberculosis in 1937, he left two more stories about Babar that were in need of illustrations. Laurent, who was only 13, was assigned to finish the artwork, but it wasn’t until he was 21 that he wrote his first book about the character.

5. LAURENT NOW WRITES THE STORIES WITH THE HELP OF HIS WIFE, PHYLLIS ROSE.

Babar has taken some more offbeat adventures in recent years, including a story in which the elephant king and his family are swept into outer space on a rocket, one in which Babar is shipwrecked on a deserted island, and a book that reveals that elephants, in fact, have been practicing yoga for years.

6. LAURENT DE BRUNHOFF THOUGHT HE WOULD BE A PAINTER.

Laurent attended Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris, the same art school as his father, with hopes of working in abstract art. However, he continued to sketch elephants in the manner of his father and eventually revived the character. "I wanted to make Babar, who was my friend, live again after the death of my father,” Laurent said in an interview with USA Today. While the father’s and son’s versions of the elephant are almost exactly the same, art critics have noted that Laurent's illustrations have more “painterly qualities.”

7. BABAR HAS BEEN CALLED THE MOST FAMOUS FRENCHMAN IN THE WORLD.

For some, more than an ambassador from an elephant kingdom, Babar shows the world what it means to be French—which includes exercising every morning before your croissant. General Charles de Gaulle famously loved the elephant because he gave the world “a certain idea of France,” and former cultural minister Frédéric Mitterrand bestowed a medal of arts and letters upon Laurent.

8. THE CHARACTER’S NAME WAS BORROWED FOR A MALWARE PROGRAM.

Last year, researchers into cyber espionage released details of a malware program, known as “Babar,” which some thought to be the work of the French. The software was capable of listening into conversations on Skype and MSN and Yahoo! messengers, logging keystrokes and watching which websites users visited.

9. BABAR HAS FACED SOME CONTROVERSY.

In East Sussex, England, the Babar books were removed from library shelves because of their portrayal of black Africans, which some critics deemed racist. Chilean writer Ariel Dorfman leads a movement of thought against the books because, according to The New York Times, he sees Babar's story as "a lesson in colonialism with racist overtones."

For his part, Laurent agrees with Dorfman's assessment and has even asked the publisher to withdraw more problematic stories.

10. EVEN AT 85 YEARS OLD, THE STORIES OF BABAR LIVE ON.

For six seasons, a cartoon-version of the Babar stories was broadcast in 30 languages in more than 150 countries, which makes the series one of the most widely distributed animated shows in history. Former First Lady Laura Bush listed the book series as one of her favorites to read with young children, and the characters have made an appearance at the White House Easter Egg Roll for many years.

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9 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Hollywood Body Doubles
Hugh Jackman and his Real Steel body double, Taris Tyler
Hugh Jackman and his Real Steel body double, Taris Tyler
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When you see the back of an actor’s head in a movie, it may not be the actor you think it is. In addition to stunt performers, most movies employ body doubles (or photo doubles) with a passing resemblance to the principal actors. While some body doubles are brought on set for specific skills—like helping an actor pass as a professional athlete—the job can often involve just being a body, whether that means being nude on camera, having photogenic hands, or appearing in place of actors who can’t be on set for some reason. Here are nine secrets of the job:

1. THEY MIGHT ONLY BE MODELING ONE BODY PART.

Body double Danielle Sepulveres has played the hands of other actors in plenty of roles in her career, on TV and in beauty commercials featuring close-up shots of her holding moisturizer or makeup. She’s drizzled dressing on salad in place of Brooke Shields. She regularly slides files across tables, makes lists, and pours wine in the place of actresses on The Good Wife. (She has also played Jill Flint's butt on the show.) “I knew only glimpses of my hands might make it into a shot, or part of my shoulder along with a wisp of hair,” she wrote of one of her jobs in Good Housekeeping in 2016. But she overheard the director complaining that her wrists looked “vastly different” than those of the principal actress in the movie, 2015’s Mania Days. “Luckily, I didn't get fired in spite of my wrists, but I wouldn't have been surprised had it happened.”

2. THEY’RE NOT JUST THERE TO SHOW THEIR BUTTS.

Yes, body doubles are often brought in if an actor doesn’t want to bare it all on camera. But they are hired for other reasons, too. For one thing, union rules mandate the actors get 12 hours off between when they leave set for the day and their next call time, so if the shoots are running long, the crew might employ someone else to stand in. Other times, it's a matter of particular talents. Most actors may be able to sing, dance, and cry on camera, but few also have the athletic skills to allow them to pass as a sports legend. In Battle of the Sexes (2017), Emma Stone plays Billie Jean King, one of the best tennis players of all time. To realistically represent King’s skills on the court, the movie makers brought in tennis doubles to play in place of Stone and her co-star, Steve Carell. Stone’s double was chosen for her playing style, which resembled King’s, and worked with King on-set to perfect her imitation. The effort was, according to The Wall Street Journal, a huge success. “Not only is the tennis believable, it’s a meticulous representation of the type of tennis played in that era: serve and volley, chipping and charging to the net, touch volleys and soft hands.”

3. ACTORS CAN GET TOUCHY ABOUT WHO PLAYS THEM.

When you are tasked with choosing a celebrity doppelgänger, you’ve got to keep egos in mind. “The choice reflects on the principal actor,” DeeDee Ricketts, the casting director for Titanic, told Vanity Fair in 2016. “We have to take into consideration that they can’t be too thin, or more beautiful, or too heavy, or too old, or else the principal actor will think, That’s how they see me?” Actors often get to give input on who will be their double, and sometimes have final approval rights written into their contracts. When she was being considered for the job of Janet Leigh's body double in Psycho's iconic shower scene, model and Playboy covergirl Marli Renfro had to strip down for both Alfred Hitchcock and Leigh herself so that they could make sure her body looked enough like Leigh's, as Renfro recently revealed at a Brooklyn screening of the documentary 78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene. In the case of nude scenes, actors might even have final approval on what physical moves their doubles are allowed to make.

4. THEY MIGHT NEVER MEET THEIR DOUBLE ...

If you’re working as an actor’s double, by definition, you’re not going to have scenes with them, and so some body doubles never meet the stars they’re pretending to be. Danish actor Elvira Friis, who worked as a body double for Charlotte Gainsbourg (and her character’s younger self, played by Stacy Martin) during the racier scenes of Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac (2013), never met the actor. “The closest I got to Charlotte Gainsbourg was that I was wearing her dress,” Friis told The Wall Street Journal.

5. OR THEY MIGHT SPEND A LOT OF TIME WITH THE PEOPLE THEY'RE PORTRAYING.

But how much time an actor spends with their doppelgänger really depends on the role. Some actors spend plenty of time with their doubles on set helping them get into the role. In What Happened to Monday (2017), Noomi Rapace plays the roles of seven identical sisters, making body doubles a necessity on set. Rapace helped direct her doubles during filming, “as they needed to know how the star would play the scene for each character so that it would sync up when she performed the part herself,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. Game of Thrones star Lena Headey (who plays Cersei) worked closely with her double Rebecca Van Cleave for a nude scene in the show’s fifth season finale. Headey walked Van Cleave through her character’s thinking and movements for each shot. Then, Headey did the same performance herself, wearing a beige dress that could later be edited out. In the final product, Headey’s facial expressions were merged with Van Cleave’s nude body.

6. THEY DON’T ALWAYS LOOK EXACTLY LIKE THEIR COUNTERPARTS.

Because body doubles are often only seen from the back or side, they may not look quite as much like their acting counterpart as you’d think. Brett Baker, who worked as Leonardo DiCaprio’s body double for Titanic, is several inches shorter than DiCaprio and seven years older. From the front, you wouldn’t peg him as a Jack Dawson lookalike. But with the same clothes and haircut, shot from above and behind, he passed easily as DiCaprio. Once Leo’s closeups were done, according to Vanity Fair, Baker was often brought in to stand opposite Kate Winslet as she played through her half of the scene. In some cases, he didn’t make it into the final shot at all, but still had to be on set for those 14-hour days.

7. THESE DAYS, THEY GET A BOOST FROM CGI.

With the help of technology, filmmakers can put their leading actor’s face on a body double’s torso, so they don’t have to limit their body doubles to just back-of-the-head or partial shots. This allows them to seamlessly meld both the main actor and the body double’s performances in post-production. That can allow directors to get exactly the scene they want in shows like Orphan Black, which features Tatiana Maslany playing multiple roles, or in cases where actors don't want to get totally naked on-camera. In rare cases, it can also be used to bring actors back from the dead. When Paul Walker died in a car crash midway through filming Furious 7 (2015), the filmmakers used his brothers and another actor as body doubles, superimposing computer-generated images of Walker’s face on their performances. Around 260 shots featuring Walker’s doubles appeared in the final cut.

8. IF AN ACTOR CAN’T ALTER THEIR WEIGHT FOR A ROLE, A BODY DOUBLE CAN FILL IN.

When Matt Damon was filming The Martian (2015), he wanted to lose 30 to 40 pounds to portray astronaut Mark Watney after he had been surviving on meager rations for years. But the filming schedule made that impossible, so a body double had to be brought in for some shots. “I was going to lose a bunch of weight in the third act of the movie, then put the weight back on,” Damon told Maclean’s. However, as the schedule shook out, they filmed the NASA interiors in Hungary, then immediately went to Jordan, which doubled as the Red Planet for the film’s purposes, and shot all the exterior shots from the beginning, middle, and end of the movie, with no time for Damon to lose a significant amount of weight. The skinny body double isn’t on screen for long. “It was, like, two shots,” Damon describes. (Still, fans noticed.)

9. SOMETIMES THEY NEVER MAKE IT IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA AT ALL.

When it comes to nude scenes, sometimes body doubles are hired but never used. Veteran body double Laura Grady was cast as Robin Wright’s lookalike for State of Play (2009), but didn’t shoot a single scene. “I just sat in my trailer, ready to go, and then at the end, [Wright] decided to do her own scenes,” Grady told Vulture in 2014. “That happens sometimes. Sometimes they just get a body double because they think they might need one, and then all of a sudden the actress is comfortable and she’s like, ‘No, I’ll just do it.’ Or they change a scene and they don’t make it as risqué.” Don’t worry, though—the double still gets paid.

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Bob Ross’s Happy Little Menagerie Is Getting the Funko Treatment, Too
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Back in August, the pop culture-loving toy fiends at Funko introduced a happy little Pop! Vinyl figurine of beloved painter/television icon Bob Ross, decked out in his trademark jeans and button-down shirt with a painter’s palette in his hand and his legendary perm (which he hated) atop his tiny little vinyl head. This Joy of Painting-themed addition to the Funko lineup proved to be an instant hit, so the company added a couple of additional toys to its roster—this time incorporating members of Ross’s happy little menagerie of pets, who were almost as integral to the long-running series as the painter himself.


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If you’re looking to score one of these toys before Christmas, it’s going to have to be a limited edition one—and it’s going to cost you. In collaboration with Target, Funko paired Ross with his favorite pocket squirrel, Pea Pod, which will set you back about $40. For just a few dollars more, you can opt to have the happy accident-prone painter come with Hoot the owl.


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On Friday, December 8, the company will release a Funko two-pack that includes Ross with a paintbrush and Ross with an adorable little raccoon.


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If you’d prefer to save a few dollars, and are willing to wait out the holiday season, you can pre-order Ross with just the raccoon for delivery around December 29.

So many happy little options, so little time.

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