11 Surprising Facts About She’s All That

Miramax
Miramax

The late 1990s saw a resurgence of teen romantic comedies, like 10 Things I Hate About You, Can’t Hardly Wait, and 1999’s She’s All That. The movie opened Super Bowl weekend and was the number one movie at the box office. It went on to gross $103,166,989 worldwide and even today still ranks as the ninth highest-grossing teen romance film (the films in the Twilight series occupy the top five spots on that list).

Freddie Prinze Jr. starred as Zack, a high schooler who makes a bet with Dean (Paul Walker) that he will groom the nerdy Laney (Rachael Leigh Cook) into a prom queen. A modern adaptation of Pygmalion and My Fair Lady, the film launched Prinze’s leading man career, and also featured early performances from Kieran Culkin, Gabrielle Union, Usher, and rapper Lil’ Kim. The soundtrack played an important part in the movie, too: Sixpence None the Richer’s “Kiss Me” and Fatboy Slim’s “The Rockafeller Skank” propelled She’s All That into iconic territory. Here are 12 surprising facts about the movie to celebrate its 20th anniversary.

1. M. Night Shyamalan did an uncredited rewrite of the script.

In 2013, M. Night Shyamalan told Movies.com that he “ghost-wrote the movie,” though the credit solely went to R. Lee Fleming Jr., who stated Shyamalan lied about writing the script. But former Miramax employee Jack Lechner confirmed Shyamalan’s involvement. “He did a solid rewrite,” Lechner told Entertainment Weekly. “He made it deeper, made the characters richer. I can see how Fleming would say it’s his movie, and I can see why M. Night would say it’s his movie. They’re both right.”

One of Shyamalan’s contributions to the rewrite was the ending graduation scene. “He came up with an idea of when he was in high school, somebody streaked across their campus at graduation, which I thought was fun but I didn’t know quite how to do that given the constraints of our rating and also the time that I had to do it,” She’s All That director Robert Iscove told Cosmopolitan. “That’s why I did the graduation with Freddie just getting up and tossing the soccer ball to her.”

2. Personality was the most important thing the filmmakers were looking for in casting Laney.

Besides Rachael Leigh Cook, the producers considered Leelee Sobieski, Mena Suvari, and Jordana Brewster for Laney. “She had to be beautiful, self-deprecating, funny, withdrawn, and all that,” Iscove told The Daily Beast about the role. Yet looks weren’t the only thing that mattered. “Times have changed a lot in Hollywood, but back when we did the movie, it was very much the Hollywood standard [to cast] a beautiful girl,” Iscove told Cosmopolitan. “It was going to be our Clark Kent moment. You’re never going to get the ugly duckling to really transform … certainly [not] back then. [So] it was more the quality of the actor that we wanted to go for, someone who could have the range from being very standoffish and cerebral and in her head, and then open up and be warmer and interact with the people and be more than, ‘How beautiful.’”

3. The film was released on the anniversary of Freddie Prinze's death.

Prinze's famous actor-comedian dad, Freddie Prinze, committed suicide on January 28, 1977 (he was pulled off life support the next day), when Prinze Jr. was just 10 months old. The movie came out on January 29, 1999—22 years after the tragedy. Because of the anniversary, Prinze wasn't feeling up to attending the premiere.

“I had crazy visions like something bad was going to happen. But I got there and everyone seemed to enjoy it,” he told The Daily Beast. “I’ve only seen the film once and it was in that weird frame of mind, so I’ve never really gotten the opportunity to properly appreciate it."

4. It helped make "Kiss Me" a worldwide hit.

Sixpence None the Richer recorded the song “Kiss Me” in 1997 for their eponymous album and released it as an official single in 1998. When the song was used in the film, it peaked at number two on the Billboard charts and remained in the top 10 for 16 straight weeks. In 1999, the song was ubiquitous; it also appeared on Dawson’s Creek a couple of times. As lead singer Leigh Nash told Pop Entertainment, a man from Columbia Records came to a showcase they did in L.A. and heard them play “Kiss Me.” “He knew it was the single and I imagine had heard it before, but he thought it would be perfect for a summer movie. Actually, it wasn’t a summer movie, it came out in the end of January, I think. But, he was right. It definitely was a hit with the young folks.”

5. Kieran Culkin didn't know why he was wearing hearing aids.

Kieran Culkin’s character, Simon, wore hearing aids in the movie, which seemed arbitrary to the actor. “It’s one of those movies that always seems to be on—and I only know that because friends are always telling me, and then they’ll ask, ‘Why did you have hearing aids?’ and I’ll be like, ‘I don’t f***ing know!’” he told The Daily Beast.

6. The "Hoover" scene was added to appeal to young male moviegoers.

Two bullies try to mess with Simon (Culkin) by putting pubic hairs on a piece of pizza, but Zack intervenes and forces the guys to “hoover” their own creation. Though the pubic hairs were made of corn stalks, the studio bosses wanted to keep the PG-13 rating. “There were hours of conversations about, ‘Well, how many corn stalks do we put on the pizza? Has he torn out all of his pubes, or only a couple of pubes?’ But now it’s one of those great, groan-worthy moments,” Iscove told The Daily Beast.

Iscove explained to Cosmo that the scene was intended to cater to men, who don’t typically like going to see romantic comedies. “So in order for them not to veto it, a certain amount of hot girls and a certain amount of gross-out [were necessary], which is why Laney starts at the beginning hocking the loogie, which is a little bit disgusting—but guys are immediately with her and with the movie. And the pube stuff keeps them going so that they can get to the romance later on. We were careful to tread that line."

7. Prinze and Dulé Hill tap danced together.

Dulé Hill wasn’t allowed to tap dance during the prom scene, but he would tap dance on set. “When we were shooting the volleyball sequence at the beach, I heard him sliding and tapping his feet on the wood, and I said, ‘Are you tap dancing?’ And he said, ‘I’m a hoofer, man.’ And that’s how we bonded,” Prinze Jr. told The Daily Beast. “We started going to this dance studio in Hollywood and we’d tap dance. We did it all the time. Eventually, I turned a room in my house into a tap dance studio and we’d put on rap music, tap dance, and drink scotch until like 4 in the morning.” The two friends reunited on Hill’s show Psych in 2010 when Prinze made a guest appearance.

8. Jodi Lynn O'Keefe had a major crush on Paul Walker.

In an interview with Cosmopolitan, Jodi Lyn O’Keefe admitted she had a crush on Paul Walker. “I was like, ‘What is that beautiful human being?’ I think we all felt that way, like, we all walked onto the set and it was like, ‘Who is this Adonis?’ He was a doll baby, that’s what I called him. He was just one of the sweetest men I’d ever met. It’s terrible when anyone passes too soon. I remember it knocked the breath out of me. I felt really heartbroken for his daughter, because that was what we talked about the most when we were at work, we talked about his daughter, and it just felt so tragic and wrong, so early in his life.”

9. Prinze trained with a professional Hacky sack player.

In one of the film’s most memorable scenes, Prinze performs hacky sack at a performance art show, in front of Laney. “I can’t hacky sack like the way you saw that sequence cut together—I have five, six reps in me tops,” Prinze told The Daily Beast. “I had to have an earpiece in my ear that kept this weird, modern art, crappy beat in my head, and do the hacky sack, and even if it fell, I had to continue the sequence: ‘Never let it drop … don’t let it drop … sooner or later, it has to drop.’ To prepare for the scene, the producers brought in a world-class hacky sack player to help Prinze keep the rhythm going, “and in five minutes he had me going from six in a row to 12 in a row,” Prinze said.

10. Lil' Kim was the most extravagant cast member.

When they filmed the movie, the rapper was already famous—but Iscove didn’t realize it until near the end of the shoot. “I thought, ‘Thank God I didn’t know about this before,’ because I only knew her as this sweet young thing that she was presenting in the film,” he told The Daily Beast. Prinze was aware of her status, though. “This movie cost us $6 million to make,” Prinze told The Daily Beast. “It was not a big budget film. Lil’ Kim showed up in a stretch limousine to the set and was wearing almost our budget in diamond earrings, rings, necklaces, sunglasses, high-heeled shoes with diamonds on top. I remember thinking, ‘This girl’s got like $3.5 million on her right now!’ And that’s how she came to the set every day. I remember thinking, ‘I wish I had some rap talent!’”

11. A remake could be happening.

For several years, there's been talk of a She's All That remake. In April 2015, The Wrap reported that Tonya Lewis Lee (Spike Lee’s wife) had plans on producing a remake, with Kenny Leon directing. But Iscove doesn’t think a remake makes sense.

“It’s so quintessential ’90s, so hopefully if they’re going to do it, they’re going to make it whatever a 2016 version is,” he told Cosmopolitan (in 2015). “But if you’re going to do that, why not just do Pygmalion in high school, why do She’s All That? She’s All That was of the time. It’s like, I could remake Pretty in Pink or Sixteen Candles, but unless I’m going to use it of that period and of that time with those people, why call it Pretty in Pink? It’s not going to be Molly Ringwald. She’s All That is not going to be Freddie and Rachael. I wish them well. I hope they make it a contemporary version.”

Because the film was based on Pygmalion, Cook looks at the idea of a remake a different way, though.

"I think that [a remake] would be neat," Cook told International Business Times in 2018. "I think it would be a heck of a lot easier than being spoofed, which has already happened to us." (That spoof she's referring to, of course, is 2001's Not Another Teen Movie, which skewered She's All That and a handful of other beloved teen films.)

An earlier version of this article ran in 2016.

10 Fast Facts About Jimi Hendrix

AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images

Though he’s widely considered one of the most iconic musicians of the 20th century, Jimi Hendrix passed away as his career was really just getting started. Still, he managed to accomplish a lot in the approximately four years he spent in the spotlight, and leave this world a legend when he died on September 18, 1970, at the age of 27. Here are 10 things you might not have known about the musical legend.

1. Jimi Hendrix didn't become "Jimi" until 1966.

Jimi Hendrix was born in Seattle on November 27, 1942 as John Allen Hendrix. He was initially raised by his mother while his father, James “Al” Hendrix, was in Europe fighting in World War II. When Al returned to the United States in 1945, he collected his son and renamed him James Marshall Hendrix.

In 1966, Chas Chandler—the bassist for The Animals, who would go on to become Jimi’s manager—saw the musician playing at Cafe Wha? in New York City. "This guy didn't seem anything special, then all of a sudden he started playing with his teeth," roadie James "Tappy" Wright, who was there, told the BBC in 2016. "People were saying, 'What the hell?' and Chas thought, 'I could do something with this kid.’”

Though Hendrix was performing as Jimmy James at the time, it was Chandler who suggested he use the name “Jimi.”

2. Muddy Waters turned Jimi Hendrix on to the guitar—and scared the hell out of him.

When asked about the guitarists who inspired him, Hendrix cited Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran, Elmore James, and B.B. King. But Muddy Waters was the first musician who truly made him aware of the instrument. “The first guitarist I was aware of was Muddy Waters,” Hendrix said. “I heard one of his old records when I was a little boy and it scared me to death because I heard all these sounds.”

3. Jimi Hendrix could not read music.


George Stroud/Express/Getty Images

In 1969, Dick Cavett asked the musician whether he could read music: “No, not at all,” the self-taught musician replied. He learned to play by ear and would often use words or colors to express what he wanted to communicate. “[S]ome feelings make you think of different colors,” he said in an interview with Crawdaddy! magazine. “Jealousy is purple—‘I'm purple with rage’ or purple with anger—and green is envy, and all this.”

4. Jimi Hendrix used his dreams as inspiration for his songwriting.

Hendrix drew inspiration for his music from a lot of places, including his dreams. “I dreamt a lot and I put a lot of my dreams down as songs,” he explained in a 1967 interview with New Musical Express. “I wrote one called ‘First Look’ and another called ‘The Purple Haze,’ which was all about a dream I had that I was walking under the sea.” (In another interview, he said the idea for “Purple Haze” came to him in a dream after reading a sci-fi novel, believed to be Philip José Farmer’s Night of Light.)

5. "Purple Haze" features one of music's most famous mondegreens.

In the same interview with New Musical Express, it's noted that the “Purple Haze” lyric “‘scuse me while I kiss the sky” was in reference to a drowning man Hendrix saw in his dream. Which makes the fact that many fans often mishear the line as “‘Scuse me, while I kiss this guy” even more appropriate. It was such a common mistake that Hendrix himself was known to have some fun with it, often singing the incorrect lyrics on stage—occasionally even accompanied by a mock make-out session. There’s even a Website, KissThisGuy.com, dedicated to collecting user-generated stories of misheard lyrics.

6. Jimi Hendrix played his guitar upside-down.

Ever the showman, Hendrix’s many guitar-playing quirks became part of his legend: In addition to playing with his teeth, behind his back, or without touching the instrument’s strings, he also played his guitar upside-down—though there was a very simple reason for that. He was left-handed. (His father tried to get him to play right-handed, as he considered left-handed playing a sign of the devil.)

7. Jimi Hendrix played backup for a number of big names.

Though Hendrix’s name would eventually eclipse most of those he played with in his early days, he played backup guitar for a number of big names under the name Jimmy James, including Sam Cooke, Little Richard, Wilson Pickett, Ike and Tina Turner, and The Isley Brothers.

In addition to the aforementioned musical legends, Hendrix also helped actress Jayne Mansfield in her musical career. In 1965, he played lead and bass guitar on “Suey,” the B-side to her single “As The Clouds Drift By.”

8. Jimi Hendrix was once kidnapped after a show.

Though the details surrounding Hendrix’s kidnapping are a bit sketchy, in Room Full of Mirrors: A Biography of Jimi Hendrix, Charles R. Cross wrote about how the musician was kidnapped following a show at The Salvation, a club in Greenwich Village:

“He left with a stranger to score cocaine, but was instead held hostage at an apartment in Manhattan. The kidnappers demanded that [Hendrix’s manager] Michael Jeffrey turn over Jimi’s contract in exchange for his release. Rather than agree to the ransom demand, Jeffrey hired his own goons to search out the extorters. Mysteriously, Jeffrey’s thugs found Jimi two days later … unharmed.

“It was such a strange incident that Noel Redding suspected that Jeffrey had arranged the kidnapping to discourage Hendrix from seeking other managers; others … argued the kidnapping was authentic.”

9. Jimi Hendrix opened for The Monkees.

Though it’s funny to imagine such a pairing today, Hendrix warming up The Monkees’s crowd of teenybopper fans actually made sense for both acts back in 1967. For the band, having a serious talent like Hendrix open for them would help lend them some credibility among serious music fans and critics. Though Hendrix thought The Monkees’s music was “dishwater,” he wasn’t well known in America and his manager convinced him that partnering with the band would help raise his profile. One thing they didn’t take into account: the young girls who were in the midst of Monkeemania.

The Monkees’s tween fans were confused by Hendrix’s overtly sexual stage antics. On July 16, 1967, after playing just eight of their 29 scheduled tour dates, Hendrix flipped off an audience in Queens, New York, threw down his guitar, and walked off the stage.

10. You can visit Jimi Hendrix's London apartment.

In 2016, the London flat where Hendrix really began his career was restored to what it would have looked like when Jimi lived there from 1968 to 1969 and reopened as a museum. The living room that doubled as his bedroom is decked out in bohemian décor, and a pack of Benson & Hedges cigarettes sits on the bedside table. There’s also space dedicated to his record collection.

Amazingly, the same apartment building—which is located in the city’s Mayfair neighborhood—was also home to George Handel from 1723 until his death in 1759; the rest of the building serves as a museum to the famed composer’s life and work.

John Carpenter’s Original Halloween Is Coming Back to Theaters This Month

Anchor Bay Entertainment
Anchor Bay Entertainment

From September 27 through October 31, the original 1978 Halloween—directed by John Carpenter and produced by Debra Hill—will be returning to theaters, though it will look a little different. Hypebeast reports that the film’s cinematographer, Dean Cundey, helped remaster and restore a copy of the original film, giving this updated version better lighting and effects.

Upon its release on October 25, 1978, Halloween became one of the highest-grossing independent films of all time (it grossed $47 million domestically on a $325,000 budget), and kicked off a decade of copycat slasher films. In 2006, the Library of Congress chose to preserve Halloween in the U.S. National Film Registry. Last year, David Gordon Green directed Halloween, a “sequel” to the original. (Basically, the new Halloween ignored plots from 37 years of Halloween sequels and remakes.)

In 2020 and 2021, two more Halloweens, both starring Jamie Lee Curtis and directed by Green, will hit theaters worldwide. But between the end of September and Halloween, you’ll have a chance to see one of the greatest horror films of all time in theaters. (While watching you can look out for these Halloween goofs.)

Unlike a lot of classic movie re-releases, however, Halloween will not be shown at big chains like AMC. And the dates, times, and ticket costs will vary among venues, which will include select art house theaters, Rooftop Cinema Clubs, and event centers across North America. To find out if Halloween will be screening at a theater near you, go to CineLife’s site and type in your zip code.

[h/t Hypebeast]

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