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The Hole in Your Spaghetti Spoon Serves a Handy Purpose

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Eyeballing perfect portions of dry pasta is a difficult skill to master—there are kitchen gadgets made for that specific reason alone. But chances are you already have a tool in your arsenal that does the trick.

According to Cosmopolitan UK, a photo series illustrating the unexpected purpose of the hole in the middle of your spaghetti spoon was recently shared on Imgur. As you can see from the pictures below, the hole is the right size to measure out a single portion of spaghetti.

In case you need another reason to have Italian tonight, a new study we shared earlier this week suggests that eating pasta does nothing to increase your body mass index (when consumed in moderation). If you’re looking for a way to celebrate that news, we suggest a plate of perfectly portioned spaghetti.

[h/t Cosmopolitan UK]

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Food
How to Make Perfect Fried Chicken, According to Chemistry
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Cooking amazing fried chicken isn’t just art—it’s also chemistry. Learn the science behind the sizzle by watching the American Chemical Society’s latest "Reactions" video below.

Host Kyle Nackers explains the three important chemical processes that occur as your bird browns in the skillet—hydrolysis, oxidation, and polymerization—and he also provides expert-backed cooking hacks to help you whip up the perfect picnic snack.

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Food
Japan Is Getting Sushi Delivery Robots
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ZMP

Japan, home of robots that feed you tomatoes, check you into your hotel, and act as surrogate children, is about to get a sushi delivery bot.

In August, the Japanese robotics company ZMP and the food delivery service Ride On Express are due to launch CarriRo Delivery, an autonomous sushi delivery robot, according to Fast Company and RocketNews24.

The sushi will come from Ride On Express’s sushi restaurant Gin no Sara and be delivered in the red robot, which looks like a cross between an ice cream cart and one of London’s signature red buses. The CarriRo robot can deliver sushi for up to 60 people and is designed to navigate the city on its own with the help of cameras and sensors.

ZMP has aspirations for the robots outside the culinary sphere. The promotional video shows the robots navigating sidewalks to pick up prescription drugs, household supplies, and more, bringing them to people who order from an app on their phone. It has headlights, so it appears you can order at all hours of the day. The robot can run for up to eight hours at a time and can be controlled remotely.

For now, though, the laws governing autonomous robots roving around public sidewalks aren’t super clear, so the CarriRo’s sushi service is debuting on private land only. That means futuristic sushi parties will be confined to office parks and other areas where it won’t run afoul of the law. (It has a top speed of less than 4 mph, so it can’t exactly run away from the police.)

For select office workers, though, this will bring the convenience of conveyor belt sushi to a whole new level.

[h/t Fast Company]

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