10 Frank Facts About Hot Dogs

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iStock

Americans love a good hot dog—so much so that, according to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, we consume about 20 billion of them a year, which works out to about 70 hot dogs per person. In celebration of National Hot Dog Day, here are some facts about franks to enjoy during your own summer barbecues.

1. THEY HAVE A SURPRISINGLY CONTENTIOUS ORIGIN.

Sausages have a history that stretches back to at least the time of Homer’s Odyssey, but the origin of the hot dog is just as tricky to pin down. There are multiple claimants to the invention of the hot dog, each with a slightly different innovation. Was the hot dog invented by the first person to shorten the name of German dachshund sausages to “hot dogs,” or the first person to put a sausage in a bread roll, or the first person to create a dedicated bun for holding a sausage? All of these creators have laid claim to the title of Hot Dog Inventor, but none have been conclusively verified.

2. THEY MIGHT BE SANDWICHES.

Hot dogs are tricky to define in another way as well, and both the general public and official organizations seem to have very strong opinions on whether hot dogs fall into the category of sandwiches or not. The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council says hot dogs are their own entities, but Merriam-Webster supports calling a hot dog a sandwich, based on the fact that it is just a piece of split bread with a filling.

3. LOS ANGELES CONSUMES THE MOST HOT DOGS PER YEAR.


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While you might expect Midwestern grill-masters to buy up the most hot dogs, the actual top consumers are Los Angelenos, who purchase 34 million pounds of franks a year. And Californians also top the per capita rankings: as of 2010, San Francisco consumed the most hot dogs per person per year.

4. REGIONAL STYLES REALLY ADD A PUNCH TO THE BASIC SAUSAGE.

Chicago is famous for dogs with onion, relish, pepper, pickle, tomato, mustard, and celery salt, but Coney Island-style hot dogs with chili, cheese, mustard, and onions are popular in their eponymous region and in Michigan. The South prefers slaw and chili on its hot dogs, while wrapping them in bacon and deep frying are popular in other regions.

5. JAPAN HAS INVENTED SOME COLORFUL HOT DOGS.

The Japanese also love their original hot dog varieties, and black hot dogs took over the Tokyo market in 2013. The bun and sausage are dyed with black charcoal ash, which apparently makes no difference in the flavor.

6. THEY HAVE A LONG HISTORY WITH BASEBALL.

Sausages have been served at baseball games since at least the 1890s. One story says that they were first served at the ballpark by the German who owned the St. Louis Browns, while another story claims an ice cream vendor decided to switch his product on a particularly cold day at the ballpark. Either way, they're still going strong after more than 120 years.

7. THEY HEADLINE THE MOST FAMOUS EATING COMPETITION.


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While legend has it that the first hot dog eating contest was held in 1916 to settle a casual bet—over who was the most patriotic, no less—the first recorded contest was in 1972. In that event, the winner ate 14 hot dogs in 12 minutes. In 2017, competitive eating legend and now 10-time Nathan's champion Joey Chestnut set a new event record, polishing off 72 hot dogs (and buns) in 10 minutes. 

8. THEY’VE BEEN FED TO ROYALTY.

In 1939, the King and Queen of Great Britain visited Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt in Hyde Park, New York. In true American spirit, the First Lady made sure to serve hot dogs during a picnic at their Hudson River property. Apparently, King George VI enjoyed them so much that he asked for seconds.

9. THEY MADE A SILENT FILM STAR FAMOUS.

To drum up business, the newly minted Nathan’s Famous hot dog restaurant at Coney Island hired a pretty redhead to serve its customers. Soon after, she was discovered by a vacationing talent scout, and became internationally famous as the silent film era's "It Girl," Clara Bow.

10. THERE IS OFFICIAL HOT DOG ETIQUETTE.

The National Hot Dog and Sausage Council put out this video on the correct way to eat a hot dog. The whole video is worth a watch, but some highlights include: no ketchup over the age of 18, no wine pairings, no utensils, and it should only take five bites to consume the entire hot dog (though you can take seven bites for a footlong). It might not be proper Emily Post material, but how can you argue with the "Queen of Wien"?

Mayochup Is Now an Official Condiment

Heinz
Heinz

Like it or not, Heinz Mayochup is on its way to a store near you. As Us Weekly reports, bottles of the blended sauce—made from mayonnaise and ketchup, naturally—will be available for purchase later this month.

Heinz's announcement of the condiment back in April was met with mixed reactions. Many were thrilled. Others repulsed. And people from Utah were pretty miffed that Heinz took credit for their beloved "fry sauce," a condiment that was reportedly invented by a local restaurant chain in 1948. (In addition to fries, the ketchup and mayo combo pairs well with burgers and can be used to make a variety of dips.)

Mayonnaise haters (we're looking at you, Millennials) may find Mayochup less than appealing, but at least it's better than Heinz's green ketchup, right? Mayochup also seems to be doing well in the United Arab Emirates—the only country where it's currently being sold. In April, Heinz took a poll on social media to see if there was any interest in bringing the condiment stateside, and 500,000 people voted in favor of the move. This week, the company launched another Twitter poll to see if there's similar interest in the UK.

If you happen to live in Culver City, California; Chicago, Illinois; or Brooklyn, New York, you may have the chance to sample it before anyone else in the country. These cities—preselected by Heinz for being the most "passionate" on social media about bringing Mayochup to the U.S.—are in the running to win a "food truck takeover." Free samples of fries and Mayochup will be dished out to passersby and diehard Heinz fans. People are now taking to Twitter to vote (using the template #MayochupYOURCITY), but act fast—voting ends September 18.

[h/t Us Weekly]

How to Make Classic Chicken Noodle Soup With One Pot

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iStock

Chicken noodle soup is the perfect meal to take you out of grilling season and into the days of comforting, cold-weather food. If you've only had chicken soup from your parents' kitchen or out of a can, you might assume the recipe takes more time than it's worth. But a soul-warming dish doesn't have to be labor-intensive: Martha Stewart's take on the recipe can be achieved with just one pot and 20 minutes of active cooking time.

Stewart's recipe for one-pot classic chicken noodle soup, from her book One Pot: 120+ Easy Meals from Your Skillet, Slow Cooker, Stockpot, and More, keeps things simple. Start with a whole chicken cut into eight pieces, or about four pounds of separate chicken parts, and add it to a stock pot with four cups of chicken broth, five cups of water, and one teaspoon of salt. Bring the water to a boil then reduce the heat to medium-low, skimming any foam off the surface as you go.

After giving the liquid a chance to simmer for five minutes, add your vegetables and aromatics: two sliced onions, four sliced carrots, 12 sprigs of parsley, two sliced celery stalks, and four crushed cloves of garlic. Partially cover the pot and let it simmer for 25 minutes.

Once the chicken is cooked through, remove it, along with the parsley, from the broth. Toss out the parsley and tear the chicken from the bones until you have about three cups of meat. Bring the broth back to a boil, then add two ounces of angel hair pasta and simmer for five minutes. Add the chicken meat back in and season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

This recipe makes about eight servings, which works perfectly as a meal for a crowd or a make-ahead lunch for the week. If you're looking for more low-stress comfort food, check out this recipe for the world's best macaroni and cheese.

[h/t Martha Stewart]

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