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Cambodian Company Offers Custom Clouds

At some point, you've probably looked up at the sky and tried to visualize shapes in the clouds above. But when you want to see something very specific—say, a peace sign or the Mercedes Benz logo—imagination isn't going to cut it. That's where Cambodian company Khmer Cloud Making Service comes in. The startup company hosts events where they create personalized clouds.

To make these special clouds, Khmer Cloud Making Service uses a mixture of soap and helium. A fan blows the sudsy concoction upwards and through a specially made stencil that pushes the soap into a shape. Then, a person standing by with a stick can slice off personalized clouds and release them into the sky. About three to five clouds can be made in one minute, according to The Huffington Post.

The cloud shapes can be surprisingly complex. In the past, the company has made intricately shaped creations like planes, smiley faces, and even the Olympics symbol.

For the most part, these creative clouds are used for opening events of new businesses, Hyperallergic reports. Khmer Cloud Making Service has four people on staff and can be hired for about $500 for an afternoon. You can find them working near Boeung Keng Kang Market.

While the business is mostly local, a spokesperson for the company says they are open to customers from all over. When asked if Khmer Cloud Making Service could be purchased overseas, the spokesperson told The Huffington Post, "Yes, why not. We can ship." You can also buy one of their machines on Facebook for about $999.

[h/t Hyperallergic]

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26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

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Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
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Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

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