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Designer Gives the Printer a Minimalist Update

Printers aren’t normally seen as fashion statements, but this conceptual design from Ludwig Rensch may have you thinking otherwise. The German-based designer has reimagined the home-office gadget by turning it on its side, Fast Co. Design reports.

The device, dubbed “Paper,” more closely resembles a piece of brightly colored luggage than something that prints documents. In place of a stack of single pages, an upright scroll is fed into the machine and cut into individual sheets once it emerges from the other side. Paper can also be used to make scans and copies. After opening a panel in the back, users insert the document and watch as an LED light on top of the box tracks its progress.

According to Rensch, his goal was to make a printer that reflected the designs he was seeing in the digital sphere. He told Fast Co. Design, “I wanted to make a product of the future, but it shouldn’t be blue and translucent like an item of Star Trek. So I asked myself, how would a company like Google design my printer if it was an app?”

Paper is just a concept for now, and its unique design would likely make it a poor candidate for mass production. Rensch says he’s not sure if the device’s printer heads and arms are able to fit a standard inkjet, which would be a major hurdle for commercial buyers. Luckily there are plenty of practical options out there to meet your printing needs.

[h/t Fast Co. Design]

All images courtesy of Ludwig Rensch via Vimeo.

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Pop Chart Lab
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Comics
The Origins of 36 Marvel Characters, Illustrated
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

No matter what their powers, every super hero has an origin story, from Spider-Man’s radioactive bite to Iron Man’s life-threatening chest shrapnel. In their latest poster, the designers at Pop Chart Lab have taken their infographic savvy to the Marvel Universe, charting the heroic origins of 36 different Marvel characters through miniature, minimalist comics.

Without using any words, they’ve managed to illustrate Bucky Barnes's plane explosion and subsequent transformation into the Winter Soldier, Jessica Jones’s car crash, the death of the Punisher’s family, and other classic stories from the major Marvel canon while paying tribute to the comic book form.

Explore the poster below, and see a zoomable version on Pop Chart Lab’s website.

A poster featuring 36 minimalist illustrations of superhero origin stories.
Pop Chart Lab

Keep your eyes open for future Marvel-Pop Chart crossovers. The Marvel Origins: A Sequential Compendium poster is “the first release of what we hope to be a marvelous partnership,” as Pop Chart Lab’s Galvin Chow puts it. Prints are available for pre-order starting at $37 and are scheduled to start shipping on March 8.

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iStock
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technology
The Design Tricks That Make Smartphones Addictive—And How to Fight Them
iStock
iStock

Two and a half billion people worldwide—and 77 percent of Americans—have smartphones, which means you probably have plenty of company in your inability to go five minutes without checking your device. But as a new video from Vox points out, it's not that we all lack self-control: Your phone is designed down to the tiniest details to keep you as engaged as possible. Vox spoke to Tristan Harris, a former Google design ethicist, who explains how your push notifications, the "pull to refresh" feature of certain apps (inspired by slot machines), and the warm, bright colors on your phone are all meant to hook you. Fortunately, he also notes there's things you can do to lessen the hold, from the common sense (limit your notifications) to the drastic (go grayscale). Watch the whole thing to learn all the dirty details—and then see how long you can spend without looking at your phone.

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