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Amazon

Amazon Launches Online Education Portal for Teachers

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Amazon

Having already launched a marketplace for college textbooks, Amazon is preparing to radically expand its educational resources—this time for teachers.

Announced Monday, Amazon Inspire will target grade-school educators by offering a library of lesson plans and worksheets. Users of Inspire will find the interface similar to their Amazon.com shopping experience, with a search bar, reviews, and star ratings. Teachers will also be able to upload their own content to share with other users and “curate” content in collections by offering suggestions on how other educators can best make use of it.  

The difference: Inspire doesn’t plan to max out credit cards. All of the content will be free.

In an interview with TechCrunch, Amazon K-12 Education General Manager Rohit Agarwal said the site came about after hearing from educators that shared resources were difficult to find online. Inspire's goal is to streamline the process, saving time by allowing teachers to search by grade level and subject.

Media analysts believe the move could be an attempt to garner entry into the lucrative digital education market, where more than $8.3 billion is spent each year on software. Amazon has not yet announced plans for when Inspire could begin to offer premium services. The site is now accepting registrations and is due to become active in August or September.

[h/t New York Times]

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Tulane University Offers Free Semester to Students Affected by Hurricane Maria
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As Puerto Rico continues to assess the damage left by Hurricane Maria last month, one American institution is offering displaced residents some long-term hope. Tulane University in New Orleans is waiving next semester’s tuition fees for students enrolled at Puerto Rican colleges prior to the storm, Forbes reports.

From now until November 1, students whose studies were disrupted by Maria can apply for one of the limited spots still open for Tulane’s spring semester. And while guests won’t be required to pay Tulane's fees, they will still be asked to pay tuition to their home universities as Puerto Rico rebuilds. Students from other islands recovering from this year’s hurricane season, like St. Martin and the U.S. Virgin Islands, are also welcome to submit applications.

Tulane knows all too well the importance of community support in the wake of disaster. The campus was closed for all of the 2005 fall semester as New Orleans dealt with the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. During that time, schools around the world opened their doors to Tulane students who were displaced. The university wrote in a blog post, “It’s now our turn to pay it forward and assist students in need.”

Students looking to study as guests at Tulane this spring can fill out this form to apply.

[h/t Forbes]

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Pablo, a Groundbreaking New BBC Series, Teaches Kids About Autism
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BBC

Autism spectrum disorder affects one in 68 kids in the U.S., but there’s still a lot of confusion surrounding the nature of the condition and what it feels like to have it. As BuzzFeed reports, a new British children’s program aims to teach viewers about autism while showing kids on the spectrum characters and stories to which they can relate.

Pablo, which premiered on the BBC’s kids’ network CBeebies earlier this month, follows a 5-year-old boy as he navigates life with autism. The show uses two mediums: At the start of an episode, Pablo is played by a live actor and faces everyday scenarios, like feeling overstimulated by a noisy birthday party. When he’s working out the conflict in his head, Pablo is depicted as an animated doodle accompanied by animal friends like Noa the dinosaur and Llama the llama.

Each character illustrates a different facet of autism spectrum disorder: Noa loves problem-solving but has trouble reading facial expression, while Llama notices small details and likes repeating words she hears. On top of demonstrating the diversity of autism onscreen, the show depends on individuals with autism behind the scenes as well. Writers with autism contribute to the scripts and all of the characters are voiced by people with autism.

“It’s more than television,” the show’s creator Gráinne McGuinness said in a short documentary about the series. “It’s a movement that seeks to build awareness internationally about what it might be like to see the world from the perspective of someone with autism.”

Pablo can be watched in the UK on CBeebies or globally on the network's website.

[h/t BuzzFeed]

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