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How Does Blood Pressure Work?

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Your heart is the master pump for all the blood in your body. With every heartbeat, your heart pushes your blood to all the vital parts of your body, such as muscles and bones, through a network of arteries, capillaries, and veins. As blood flows through the tube-like arteries, it presses up against the walls of the blood vessels with varying degrees of strength. The strength or weakness of this pressure is called your blood pressure (BP).

Each time your heart squeezes, moving your blood to its various destinations, your blood pressure goes up—this number is referred to by a blood pressure reading as systolic. Then, as the heart relaxes after each contraction, your blood pressure goes down; that is called the diastolic reading. Together, these two numbers are presented as a score, systolic over diastolic: Your doctor might tell you that your BP is “120 over 80.”

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), normal blood pressure should reflect systolic pressure between 90 and 120, over a diastolic pressure between 60 and 80. Your doctor may take this measurement with a fancy-named instrument called a sphygmomanometer—an inflatable rubber cuff attached to a manual air pump. When the doctor inflates the cuff at your arm with air, it temporarily cuts off blood flow, and when it releases, the blood starts flowing again, revealing those two key numbers.

Nowadays, though, doctors are recommended to use an automatic blood pressure cuff, which relies on a different method and seems to be more accurate. While the manual cuff relies on auscultation, in which the doctor listens for the correct pressures using a stethoscope/microphone, automatic blood pressure cuffs are usually oscillometric. When blood passes under the cuff, the arm increases in circumference ever so slightly. And by measuring the amplitude of the oscillations (hence oscillometric) at a continuous interval of pressures, blood pressure can be calculated in much the same way.

If you have high blood pressure, a.k.a. hypertension—approximately 130/80 or higher in a person of average health—your heart is working too hard to pump the blood through your body, which becomes dangerous. According to the AHA [PDF], elevated blood pressure is 120–129/less than 80; hypertension stage 1 is 130–139 (systolic) or 80–89 (diastolic); and hypertension stage 2 is 140 or higher (systolic) or 90 or higher (diastolic). If your blood pressure hits 180/120, you're in hypertensive crisis, and you should get help.

If you fall into the above categories, your doctor will recommend changes to diet and exercise and probably medication. High blood pressure is often a precursor to heart disease or a heart attack and can be a side effect of other diseases, such as diabetes. However, your blood pressure can temporarily rise due to stress, pregnancy, and even some common medications, including over-the-counter pain relievers and antidepressants. One high reading will not necessarily mean you have hypertension—but it’s good to keep vigilant.

Editor's note: This story was updated in July 2018 to reflect new blood pressure guidelines from the AHA.

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MARS Bioimaging
The World's First Full-Color 3D X-Rays Have Arrived
MARS Bioimaging
MARS Bioimaging

The days of drab black-and-white, 2D X-rays may finally be over. Now, if you want to see what your broken ankle looks like in all its full-color, 3D glory, you can do so thanks to new body-scanning technology. The machine, spotted by BGR, comes courtesy of New Zealand-based manufacturer MARS Bioimaging.

It’s called the MARS large bore spectral scanner, and it uses spectral molecular imaging (SMI) to produce images that are fully colorized and in 3D. While visually appealing, the technology isn’t just about aesthetics—it could help doctors identify issues more accurately and provide better care.

Its pixel detectors, called “Medipix” chips, allow the machine to identify colors and distinguish between materials that look the same on regular CT scans, like calcium, iodine, and gold, Buzzfeed reports. Bone, fat, and water are also differentiated by color, and it can detect details as small as a strand of hair.

“It gives you a lot more information, and that’s very useful for medical imaging. It enables you to do a lot of diagnosis you can’t do otherwise,” Phil Butler, the founder/CEO of MARS Bioimaging and a physicist at the University of Canterbury, says in a video. “When you [have] a black-and-white camera photographing a tree with its leaves, you can’t tell whether the leaves are healthy or not. But if you’ve got a color camera, you can see whether they’re healthy leaves or diseased.”

The images are even more impressive in motion. This rotating image of an ankle shows "lipid-like" materials (like cartilage and skin) in beige, and soft tissue and muscle in red.

The technology took roughly a decade to develop. However, MARS is still working on scaling up production, so it may be some time before the machine is available commercially.

[h/t BGR]

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More Studies See Links Between Alzheimer's and Herpes
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Although it was discovered in 1906, Alzheimer’s disease didn’t receive significant research attention until the 1970s. In 1984, scientists identified the plaque-like buildup of amyloid beta proteins in brain tissue that causes nerve damage and can lead to symptoms like memory loss, personality changes, and physical debility.

Now, researchers are learning why amyloid beta tends to collect in brain tissue like barnacles on a ship. It might not be rallying expressly to cause damage, but to protect the brain from another invader: the herpes simplex virus.

As The Atlantic recently noted, a number of studies have strengthened the notion that amyloid beta activity is working in response to herpes, the virus that travels along nerve pathways and typically causes cold sores around the mouth (HSV-1) or genitals (HSV-2). In a study involving mice, those engineered to produce more amyloid beta were more resistant to the herpes virus than those who were not.

But when too much amyloid beta is produced to combat the virus, the proteins can affect the brain’s neurons. And while herpes tends to target specific pathways in the body that result in external sores, it’s possible that the virus might act differently in an older population that is susceptible to more widespread infection. Roughly half of adults under age 50 in the U.S. are infected with HSV-1 and 12 percent with HSV-2, which suggests that a large swath of the population could be vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease. Two other strains of the virus, HHV-6A and HHV-7, have also been found to be more common in the brains of deceased Alzheimer’s patients than in the general population.

More research will be needed to further understand the possible relationship between the two. If more findings support the theory, then it’s possible that antiviral drugs or vaccines targeting herpes might also reduce the chances of amyloid beta buildup.

[h/t Atlantic]

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