10 Things Made from Maple Syrup

Stamford Museum & Nature Center via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
Stamford Museum & Nature Center via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

The most common use for maple syrup is, of course, on pancakes, but there are plenty of other ways to use the sweet stuff. It’s a wonderful way to flavor and sweeten recipes, and maple syrup can be further refined to make other products. Many of Canada's most memorable souvenir items, whether it's candles or cookies, feature maple syrup flavors and themes. 

True maple syrup comes from the sap harvested from maple trees, and some communities even make a festival out of the sap harvesting season. Quebec is the world’s leading producer—it's so large it hosts the Global Strategic Maple Syrup Reserve. This year, Canada produced 13.5 million gallons of sap. Here are some of the ways they used it.

1. MAPLE BUTTER

Maple butter, also called maple cream, is a spreadable maple product that’s extremely sweet and cherished by maple fans. To make it, syrup is boiled until it reaches the soft ball stage, then cooled and stirred. The sugar will partially crystallize, and the result is syrup in a form that won’t roll off your toast. Food52 has instructions for maple butter with a tiny bit of cream or oil added for consistency. You can also make it with no other ingredients at all.

2. MAPLE LIQUEUR

Pearl Pirie via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Perhaps the most Canadian drink possible, maple liqueur is made by mixing Canadian whiskey with maple syrup. It’s not normally found bottled in liquor stores because it’s so easy to make at home, but more and more distillers are experimenting with it as word gets out in other countries. You can use it as flavoring for several beverages, like coffee, or in mixed drinks.

3. MAPLE SUGAR

Maple sugar is the granular result of boiling all the water out of maple syrup. Making it is tricky, as the syrup can burn when the water content gets low. First Nations people made maple sugar because it weighs less and lasts longer than maple syrup. Maple sugar can be used as a substitute for granulated cane sugar, and will give your recipe a little more flavor.  

4. MAPLE TAFFY

MartialArtsNomad.com via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

In her book Little House in the Big Woods, Laura Ingalls Wilder told us how her Pa would gather maple sap, and when the syrup was ready, they’d drizzle it over a pan of snow and let it harden into candy. This is maple taffy, malleable enough to wrap around a stick and chewy enough to last a long time. If you aren’t boiling down your own sap, you’ll need to heat the maple syrup to make maple taffy at home. Here are some instructions

5. MAPLE BEER

A number of craft brewers are now making beer with maple syrup. Despite what you may think, maple beer is not any sweeter than other beers. The yeast ferments away the sugar, while leaving just a bit of maple flavor, and brewers must work to play up the maple notes. Because maple syrup is relatively expensive, the beverage remains something of a niche product.

6. MAPLE BARBECUE SAUCE

shivery timbers via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Barbecue sauce is one of the many recipes that can be enhanced with maple sugar or maple syrup in place of cane sugar. There are plenty of different ways to make maple barbecue sauce, but here’s one basic recipe to get you started.

7. MAPLE COOKIES

Maple leaf cream cookies, like these, are a Canadian favorite. In 2009, President Obama made local headlines when he purchased three maple leaf-shaped shortbread cookies at Le Moulin de Province bakery in Ottawa’s ByWard Market. Despite their shape and royal red icing, the cookies contained no actual maple flavoring, which seems like a pity. Of course, you can make many maple syrup-sweetened cookies at home. This recipe, for Canadian Maple Cookies, contains three kinds of sugar: maple syrup, brown sugar, and granulated sugar. 

8. HOT MAPLE TODDY

Patrick Truby via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

This classic recipe for a hot toddy contains whiskey, lemon, butter, and maple syrup in place of the honey you may be more familiar with. If you want the evening to last longer, you might want to add some hot water or tea to the recipe.

9. MAPLE BARS

Danielle Chang via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A maple bar is an oblong doughnut covered in maple icing or maple butter. A modern—and decadent—twist is to add a slice or two of bacon to the top. Although you'll find them at many bakeries, they are also fairly easy to make at home using canned biscuit dough, and the icing is even easier if you have maple butter on hand.

10. MAPLE SYRUP SOAP

Maple syrup is used in soaps for its scent, but to make sure yours is made with real maple syrup instead of an artificial scent, you can make it at home. The small amount of syrup added to a neutral soap base won’t leave your skin sticky, but it is supposed to have some moisturizing effect.

Ninja’s Hot & Cold Brewed System Is the Only Coffee Maker You’ll Ever Need

Amazon
Amazon

Update: The Ninja Hot & Cold Brewed System is on sale for $120 ($40 off) for Sam's Club members until May 19.

For people who just want a cup of joe to help them get out the door in the morning, the French presses, Chemexes, Aeropresses, Moka pots, and other specialized devices that coffee aficionados swear by probably seem more overwhelming than appealing. Ditto the fancy cappuccino machines at local cafes. That’s where Ninja’s new Hot & Cold Brewed System comes in: It was created to give coffee addicts a myriad of options with minimal fuss, not to mention minimal equipment. And it makes tea, too!

“Coffeehouses are known for having an endless selection, but current at-home brewers haven't given users the vast variety of choice we thought possible, and certainly not all in one product," Mark Rosenzweig, CEO of SharkNinja, said in a press release. "The Ninja Hot & Cold Brewed System changes the category entirely. This innovative system is more than just a machine you use in the morning; it's your all-day brewing partner.”

The Hot & Cold Brewed System comes with two baskets: one for coffee and one for tea. It knows what you're making to make based on the basket you insert, and the available options for that basket will light up. The machine allows the user to make six different sizes of coffee or tea, from a single cup all the way up to a full 50-ounce (10-cup) carafe.

And of course, as the name suggests, the system can make both hot and iced beverages. For coffee, it has five brew options: classic, rich, over ice, cold brew, and specialty (a concentrated brew for milky drinks like cappuccinos). If you’re making tea, you can choose between hot and cold brews optimized for herbal, black, oolong, white, or green tea.

When you select an over ice or cold brew, the machine automatically doubles the strength of your beverage so it doesn't get overly diluted by the ice cubes in the carafe. Even better, the Ninja can make cold brew in just 10 to 15 minutes, whereas other systems and methods typically take hours. (Hot coffee is brewed at 205°F, while the cold brew is made at 101°F.) And the system has a hot and cold frother that folds into the side so you can make barista-level lattes, too.

These bells and whistles sound impressive on paper, but how do they perform in real life? Ninja sent me Hot & Cold Brewed System to test for myself.

Ease of Use

Though it might look like something developed by NASA, the Hot & Cold Brewed System is designed to easily work with the twist of a dial and the push of a button, and it delivers. From loading in the correct amount of grounds with the system’s “smart scoop” to picking what type of brew you’d like, it’s simple enough to use even while bleary-eyed in the morning. It’s also easy to schedule a delayed brew so you can do the rest of your morning routine while your coffee brews. (Here’s the only drawback I can think of about this machine: When it starts brewing, it’s kind of noisy—loud enough to make my cats jump. It’s not a dealbreaker, but if you live in a small apartment and plan to brew coffee so that it’s ready right when you wake up, it might be something to consider.)

The system even tells you when it needs to be descaled. The “clean” button will light up, at which point you simply fill the water reservoir with descaling solution and water and press the clean button. A countdown lets you know how much longer the clean cycle will last.

Taste and Flavor

I swapped out an old, cheap coffee maker for the Hot & Cold Brewed System, and the difference was immediately noticeable. Whether hot or cold, the coffee made by the H&CBS was a better, smoother cup of joe. That’s due to what Ninja has dubbed Thermal Flavor Extraction automated brewing technology, which, according to a press release, “knows the precise temperatures, correct bloom times, and proper levels of saturation for every possible beverage combination to ensure a great taste every time.”

Whatever tech they use, it works. The coffee I make in this machine is consistently tasty. The rich brew setting works exactly as advertised, too, providing a richer, bolder flavor than the classic brew.

Features and Accessories

One of the best things about the H&CBS is the fact that it cuts down on waste significantly. Unlike other machines, it doesn't require any plastic pods or paper filters. Instead, it comes with two permanent filters, one for coffee and one for tea.

And the cold brew function is a game changer if you prefer iced coffee to hot. Not only does it brew quickly, but it eliminates the messy cleanup that comes with making cold brew yourself.

Typically priced at $230 for the thermal carafe version (or $200 for the glass carafe), the Hot & Cold Brewed System is significantly more expensive than a simpler drip coffee machine. But if you’re a cold brew addict looking to treat yourself, it’s worth it. Consider springing for the slightly more expensive thermal carafe model, which will keep your java hot or cold for hours. (I’ve left ice in it overnight and found cubes the next morning.)

You can get the Hot & Cold Brewed System on Amazon, Walmart, Macy's, Sam's Club, or directly on Ninja’s website starting at $160.

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