Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0
Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

One Way to Keep Invasive Asian Carp at Bay: Carbonate the Great Lakes

Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0
Quinn Dombrowski via Flickr Creative Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

Threats to our environment can take many forms. They may look like drought, wildfires, or killer algae. They may also look like carp. Since the 1970s, Asian carp have been steadily spreading through American waterways and are currently speeding toward the Great Lakes. But scientists are hoping to stop them before they get there. The newest proposal? Carbonate the water. A new study found that Asian carp will swim away from water infused with carbon dioxide. The findings were published in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.

Image credit: Kenpei via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Asian carp and other invasive species may not look scary, but that doesn’t stop them from destroying ecosystems. These resilient organisms are bullies, pushing their way into habitats, seizing all the resources for themselves, multiplying fast, and starving out the locals. (On top of that, huge individual Asian carp have been known to leap from the water and hit boaters right in the face, causing injuries and fish stories nobody will believe.)

Many different carp-control approaches have already been put forward. Local officials and researchers have proposed—and, in some cases, tried—electrifying the water, adding poison, building aquatic fences, and even genetically engineering the fish. But to date, the carp have survived and eluded every attempt to thwart them.

The idea of carbonating the water is not a new one; previous laboratory studies suggested that carbon dioxide could be an effective carp deterrent. But nobody had tested the hypothesis in open water until now. Scientists from the University of Illinois and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stocked a secure research pond with invasive bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) and silver carp (H. molitrix), as well as four native species. They then added plumes of recycled carbon dioxide to the pond water, a little bit at a time, and watched to see how the fish would behave.

Sure enough, both carp species avoided CO2-treated areas of the pond, even crowding into smaller areas just to stay out of the carbonated water. They also changed their swimming patterns and slowed their movements.

The problem is that the carbonated water also drove out three out of the four local fish species. They huddled in the non-carbonated parts of the pond right along with the carp invaders.

So no, let’s not rush to carbonate the Great Lakes just yet.

“Further tests are needed before CO2 can be used in Asian carp management,” USGS scientist and co-author Jon Amberg said in a press statement. “Understanding the effects of long-term, elevated CO2 exposure on fish and other organisms can help assess its risks to native species.”

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7 Fast Facts About Animal Farting
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iStock

Anyone who’s had a pet can testify that dogs and cats occasionally get gassy, letting rip noxious farts and then innocently looking up as if to say “Who, me?” You may not have considered the full breadth of animal life passing gas in the world, though—and not just mammals. In a new book, ecologist Nick Caruso and zoologist Dani Rabaiotti detail the farting habits (or lack thereof) of 80 different animals. Here are seven weird animal farting facts we learned from Does It Fart?.

1. FOR ONE FISH, FARTING IS AN EMERGENCY.

A black-and-white illustration of a fish floating upside down on the surface of the water
Ethan Kocak

The diet of the Bolson pupfish, a freshwater fish found in northern Mexico, can lead to dangerous levels of gas. The pupfish feeds on algae, and it can inadvertently eat the gas bubbles that algae produces in warm temperatures. The air inflates the fish’s intestines and distends its belly, messing with its equilibrium and making it difficult to swim. Even if it tries to bury itself in sediment at the bottom of a pool, as Bolson pupfish are wont to do, the air causes the fish to rise to the surface, where it’s at risk of being eaten by a bird. If the fish doesn’t fart, it will likely die, either from predation or because its intestines rupture under the pressure of the trapped gas.

2. MANATEES USE FARTS AS A SWIMMING TECHNIQUE.

The Bolson pupfish isn't the only animal that needs healthy farts to maneuver underwater. Buoyancy is vital for swimming manatees, and they rely on digestive gas to keep them afloat. The West Indian manatee has pouches in its intestines where it can store farty gasses. When they have a lot of gas stored up, they’re naturally more buoyant, floating to the surface of the water. When they fart out that gas, they sink. Unfortunately, that means that a manatee’s ability to fart is vital to its well-being. When a manatee is constipated and can’t pass gas properly, it can lose the ability to swim properly and end up floating around with its tail above its head.

3. TERMITE FARTS ARE A SIGNIFICANT SOURCE OF GLOBAL EMISSIONS.

A black-and-white illustration of a termite farting
Ethan Kocak

They’re not as bad as cars or cows, but termites fart a lot, and because they are so numerous, that results in a lot of methane. Each termite only lets rip about half a microgram of methane gas a day, but every termite colony is made up of millions of individuals, and termites live all over the world. All told, the insects produce somewhere between 5 and 19 percent of global methane emissions per year.

4. FERRETS ARE SURPRISED BY THEIR OWN FARTS.

Ferrets are quite the fart machines. They not only let ‘em rip while pooping—which they do every few hours on a normal day—but they get particularly gassy when they’re stressed. The pungent smells are often news to their creators, though. According to the book, “owners often report a confused look on their pet’s face in the direction of their backside after they audibly pass gas.” And you don't want your ferret to get really scared: Their fear response involves screaming, puffing up, and simultaneous farting and pooping.

5. A BEADED LACEWING’S FARTS CAN BE DEADLY.

A black-and-white illustration of a beaded lacewing standing triumphantly over a prone termite
Ethan Kocak

A winged insect known as the beaded lacewing carries a powerful weapon within its butt, what Caruso and Rabaiotti call “one of the very few genuinely fatal farts known to science.” As a hunting strategy, Lomamyia latipennis larvae release a potent fart containing the chemical allomone, paralyzing and killing their termite prey.

6. WHALE FARTS MAKE QUITE THE SPLASH.

A black-and-white illustration of a whale farting above water while a woman on a boat speeds behind it
Ethan Kocak

As befits their size, whales produce some of biggest farts on the planet. A blue whale’s digestive system can hold up to a ton of food in its multiple stomach chambers, and there are plenty of bacteria in that system waiting to break that food down. This, of course, leads to farts. While not many whale farts have been caught on camera, scientists have witnessed them—and report them to be “incredibly pungent,” as Rabaiotti and Caruso tell it.

7. NOT ALL ANIMALS FART.

Octopuses don’t fart, nor do other sea creatures like soft-shell clams or sea anemones. Birds don’t, either. Meanwhile, sloths may be the only mammal that doesn’t fart, according to the book (although the case for bat farts is pretty tenuous). Having a belly full of trapped gas is dangerous for a sloth. If things are working normally, the methane produced by their gut bacteria is absorbed into their bloodstream and eventually breathed out.

The woodlouse has an odd way of getting rid of gas, too, though it’s technically not flatulence. Instead of peeing, woodlice excrete ammonia through their exoskeleton, with bursts of these full-body “farts” lasting up to an hour at a time.

The cover of 'Does It Fart?'
Hachette Books

Does It Fart? is available for $15 from Amazon or Barnes & Noble.

Scientists Capture the First Footage of an Anglerfish’s Parasitic Mating Ritual

The deep sea is full of alien-looking creatures, and the fanfin anglerfish is no exception. The toothy Caulophryne jordani, with its expandable stomach and glowing lure and fin rays, is notable not just for its weird looks, but also its odd mating method, which has been captured in the wild on video for the first time, as CNET and Science report.

If you saw a male anglerfish and a female anglerfish together, you would probably not recognize them as the same species. In fact, in the video below, you might not be able to find the male at all. The male anglerfish is lure-less and teeny-tiny (as much as 60 times smaller in length) compared to his lady love.

And he's kind of a deadbeat boyfriend. The male anglerfish attaches to the female's belly in a parasitic mating ritual that involves biting into her and latching on, fusing with her so that he can get his nutrients straight from her blood. He stays there for the rest of his fishy life, fertilizing her eggs and eventually becoming part of her body completely.

Observing an anglerfish in action, or really at all, is extremely difficult. There are only 14 dead specimens from this particular anglerfish species held at natural history museums throughout the world, and they are all female. Since anglerfish can't live in the lab, seeing them in their natural habitat is the only way to observe them. This video, shot in 2016 off the coast of Portugal by researchers with the Rebikoff-Niggeler Foundation, is only the third time we've been able to record deep-sea anglerfish behavior.

Take a look for yourself, and be grateful that your own relationship isn't quite so codependent.

[h/t CNET]

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