adampapagan on Instagram
adampapagan on Instagram

Creepy Lucille Ball Statue May Find Long-Term Home

adampapagan on Instagram
adampapagan on Instagram

Last year, the world learned of a terrifying bronze statue of Lucille Ball sculpted by artist Dave Poulin. The statue has stood in a park in Ball's hometown of Celoron, New York since 2009, but an online petition calling for its removal brought the homage to center stage and earned it the nickname Scary Lucy. According to New York Upstate, another artist's statue of Ball will soon replace Poulin's sculpture, but fans of the horrific original will likely still be able to take photos with it nearby.

Initially, Poulin reportedly wanted five figures to repair his statue's face, though he later apologized and offered to fix it for free. New York Upstate reports that because the sculpture has become a popular tourist attraction, it will probably remain as is and stay in Celoron, perhaps even in the same park. "It put Celoron back on the map," town mayor Scott Schrecengost told Yahoo News. "It's kind of iconic now."

The new statue was created by Syracuse-based sculptor Carolyn Palmer, who used episodes of I Love Lucy as inspiration during the nine months she spent working on it. For those who will be in the Celoron area this summer, Palmer's statue will be unveiled on Lucille Ball's birthday, August 6. Check out some of the images of the original statue below for your future #artselfie inspiration.

World famous sculpture of Lucille Ball feeding me today...

A photo posted by Om'Mas Keith (@ommaskeith) on

Lucy you got some splainin' to do...about why you don't look like yourself. #lucystatue

A photo posted by Chloe Franklin (@choleefranklin) on

A photo posted by Joe Matt (@josephmatt) on

[h/t New York Upstate]

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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Mathew Tucciarone
Candytopia, the Interactive Art Installation Made of Sweet Treats, Is Coming to New York City
Mathew Tucciarone
Mathew Tucciarone

A colorful exhibition is sharing some eye candy—and actual candy—with visitors. The sweet art pop-up, called Candytopia, is heading to New York City this summer following successful stints in Los Angeles and Santa Monica, Gothamist reports.

Candytopia feels a little like Willy Wonka’s chocolate room. More than a dozen rooms with psychedelic backdrops will be on view, as well as candy-inspired interpretations of famous artworks such as Mona Lisa and The Thinker. The installation is the brainchild of Jackie Sorkin, the star of TLC’s Candy Queen.

Many of the art installations are made from actual candy, but unlike Wonka’s lickable wallpaper, visitors will have to keep their hands and tongues to themselves. Instead, guests will be given samples of various sweet treats like gummies, chocolates, and “nostalgic favorites.”

Forbes named Candytopia one of the best pop-up museums to visit in 2018. New York City seems the perfect place for the exhibit, having formerly hosted other food-inspired pop-ups like the Museum of Pizza and the Museum of Ice Cream.

Candytopia will debut in New York City on August 15 at Penn Plaza at 145 West 32nd Street. Tickets must be purchased in advance, and they can be ordered on Candytopia’s website. Private events and birthday parties can also be arranged.

Keep scrolling to see some more installations from Candytopia.

A wing of the Candytopia exhibit
Mathew Tucciarone

An Egyptian-inspired statue made of candy
Mathew Tucciarone

A candy version of the Mona Lisa
Mathew Tucciarone

A shark statue
Mathew Tucciarone

[h/t Gothamist]

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