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Travel Channel

This Summer, Dive Into One of America's Best Swimming Holes

Travel Channel
Travel Channel

Beach vacations are fun, but there's a nostalgic, all-American allure about whiling away a dog day afternoon at a hidden swimming hole. This summer, perfect your belly-flop at one of the nation's top 10 springs, pools, waterfalls, and quarries, as ranked by the Travel Channel. These watery spots will be featured in a new series, Top Secret Swimming Holes, which premieres Sunday, June 19 at 10 p.m. Check out the list below to see if any of your local favorites made the cut!

BINGHAM FALLS // STOWE, VERMONT


ENDERS FALLS // GRANBY, CONNECTICUT

Courtesy of the Travel Channel

GINNIE SPRINGS // HIGH SPRINGS, FLORIDA

Wikipedia // CC BY-SA 4.0

LITTLE RIVER FALLS // FORT PAYNE, ALABAMA 

MCKINNEY FALLS // AUSTIN, TEXAS


Larry D. Moore, Wikipedia // CC BY-SA 3.0

OPAL POOL // SPRINGFIELD, OREGON

Courtesy of the Travel Channel

QUARRY PARK // WAITE PARK, MINNESOTA

Courtesy of the Travel Channel

SEVEN TEACUPS // TULARE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

Courtesy of the Travel Channel

SLIDE ROCK // SEDONA, ARIZONA

Courtesy of the Travel Channel

WAIOKA POND // MAUI, HAWAII

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Belly Flop Physics 101: The Science Behind the Sting
iStock
iStock

Belly flops are the least-dignified—yet most painful—way of making a serious splash at the pool. Rarely do they result in serious physical injury, but if you’re wondering why an elegant swan dive feels better for your body than falling stomach-first into the water, you can learn the laws of physics that turn your soft torso a tender pink by watching the SciShow’s video below.

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Courtesy The Tate
The Tate Britain’s Latest Exhibit Is Curated by an Algorithm
Courtesy The Tate
Courtesy The Tate

Add another job to the list of careers that are going to be taken over by robots. Museum curators, too, should get ready to be obsolete like the rest of us. The Tate Britain’s latest exhibit, Recognition, is algorithmically curated, as Co.Design reports.

Recognition was the 2016 winner of the Tate’s IK Prize, a digital creativity award sponsored by Microsoft that focuses on innovative ways to explore the Tate’s collection of British art. The artificial intelligence program connects the collection to current photojournalism from Reuters, updated minute-by-minute. It was created by Fabrica, an Italian communication research firm, and the French artificial intelligence company JoliBrain.

Screenshot via Tate.org.uk

The exhibition, which will run until November 27, will be ever-changing as new images come in and are paired with art from the collection. The algorithm matches images based on object recognition; the gender, age, and emotions of the people pictured; the image’s composition; and the title, date, and other descriptors of the image.

Online, users can explore ongoing matches and see what similarities the algorithm found between the two images, whether accurate or not. A comparison of Hillary Clinton and Portrait of an Unknown Lady, by Cornelius Johnson, for instance, mislabels several things, including identifying the woman in the painting as a man and the background of both portraits as a blue sky. The responses people have to the matches will be posted on the exhibition’s virtual gallery at the end of the project.

[h/t Co.Design]

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