Pottermore
Pottermore

Exhibition Devoted to Harry Potter Graphic Art Opens in London

Pottermore
Pottermore

The London-based design studio MinaLima is behind all of the graphic art in the eight Harry Potter films, from the Marauder’s Map to Ron’s Howler—and now, as It’s Nice That reports, wizards and muggles alike can get an up-close look at their work in a brand new exhibition.

The House of MinaLima, located at 26 Greek Street in London, contains around 50 props from the Harry Potter films on loan from Warner Bros. on the top two floors. Other features, according to Pottermore, are “a room-size Marauder’s Map, enough prints to fill a wizarding press room, designs that were found in Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes, and a library with Hogwarts acceptance letters shooting from the fireplace.” Limited edition prints will be sold on the first floor. You can watch the four-story space being transformed below:

Miraphora Mina and Eduardo Lima, who met in 2001 on the Harry Potter set, picked the exhibition space because, Lima told Pottermore, “It’s like Grimmauld Place in there, with narrow staircases, wonky walls, and low ceilings.” Mina said that the duo wanted the space “to feel like it could have been there forever, like a museum. And as though it could disappear between the other buildings. By the time you reach the top floor, you can touch the ceiling. It’s like Harry’s cupboard under the stairs, but at the top of the building.”

Pottermore

In addition to extending their partnership beyond the Harry Potter series—the duo has created artwork inspired by Peter Pan, The Jungle Book, and more. They’ve also done work on the Harry Potter spin-off Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which follows the adventures of Newt Scamander and hits theaters November 18, 2016.

If you can’t make it to the exhibition, MinaLima also sells replicas of the art they created for the films on its website. House of MinaLima runs until February 2017, and entry is free.

MinaLima

MinaLima

MinaLima

[h/t It’s Nice That]

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Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
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New 'Eye Language' Lets Paralyzed People Communicate More Easily
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0

The invention of sign language proved you don't need to vocalize to use complex language face to face. Now, a group of designers has shown that you don't even need control of your hands: Their new type of language for paralyzed people relies entirely on the eyes.

As AdAge reports, "Blink to Speak" was created by the design agency TBWA/India for the NeuroGen Brain & Spine Institute and the Asha Ek Hope Foundation. The language takes advantage of one of the few motor functions many paralyzed people have at their disposal: eye movement. Designers had a limited number of moves to work with—looking up, down, left, or right; closing one or both eyes—but they figured out how to use these building blocks to create a sophisticated way to get information across. The final product consists of eight alphabets and messages like "get doctor" and "entertainment" meant to facilitate communication between patients and caregivers.

Inside of a language book.
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

This isn't the only tool that allows paralyzed people to "speak" through facial movements, but unlike most other options currently available, Blink to Speak doesn't require any expensive technology. The project's potential impact on the lives of people with paralysis earned it the Health Grand Prix for Good at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity earlier in June.

The groups behind Blink to Speak have produced thousands of print copies of the language guide and have made it available online as an ebook. To learn the language yourself or share it with someone you know, you can download it for free here.

[h/t AdAge]

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Futuristic New Street Toilets Are Coming to San Francisco
SmithGroupJJR
SmithGroupJJR

San Francisco’s streets are getting shiny new additions: futuristic-looking public toilets. Co.Design reports that San Francisco’s Department of Public Works has chosen a new design for self-cleaning street toilets by the architectural firm SmithGroupJJR that will eventually replace the city’s current public toilets.

The design is a stark contrast to the current San Francisco toilet aesthetic, a green knockoff of Paris’s Sanisettes. (They’re made by the same company that pioneered the Parisian version, JCDecaux.) The tall, curvy silver pods, called AmeniTREES, are topped with green roof gardens designed to collect rainwater that can then be used to flush the toilets and clean the kiosks themselves. They come in several different variations, including a single or double bathroom unit, one with benches, a street kiosk that can be used for retail or information services, and a design that can be topped by a tree. The pavilions also have room for exterior advertising.

Renderings of the silver pod bathrooms from the side and the top
SmithGroupJJR

“The design blends sculpture with technology in a way that conceptually, and literally, reflects San Francisco’s unique neighborhoods,” the firm’s design principal, Bill Katz, explained in a press statement. “Together, the varied kiosks and public toilets design will also tell a sustainability story through water re-use and native landscapes.”

San Francisco has a major street-poop problem, in part due to its large homeless population. The city has the second biggest homeless population in the country, behind New York City, and data collected in 2017 shows that the city has around 7500 people living on its streets. Though the city started rolling out sidewalk commodes in 1996, it doesn’t have nearly enough public toilets to match demand. There are only 28 public toilets across the city right now, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

These designs aren’t ready to go straight into construction first—the designers have to work with JCDeaux, which installs the city’s toilets, to adapt them “to the realities of construction and maintenance,” as the Chronicle puts it. Then, those plans will have to be submitted to the city’s arts commission and historic preservation commission before they can be installed.

[h/t Co.Design]

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