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Sankei

Paper Craft Kit Lets You Recreate the World of Spirited Away

Sankei
Sankei

Studio Ghibli's Spirited Away (2001) is so beautifully animated it's easy to get lost in its immersive world. And just like the beloved film, these miniature paper scenes spotted by RocketNews24 don't skimp on detail.

The village from Spirited Away is the latest addition to the line of paper craft kits produced by the Japanese company Sankei. The fine details have already been added, from the lettering on the storefronts to the plates of food inside the stall where Chihiro's parents have transformed into pigs. Each component is laser-cut from thick paper board and requires no folding or snipping to assemble. All you need to do is glue the pieces together to bring the scene to life.

The 4800 yen ($45) set is one in a series of paper crafting kits depicting village buildings featured in the film. Other DIY paper sculptures from the company include the castle from Howl's Moving Castle (2004), the bathhouse from Spirited Away, and the catbus from My Neighbor Totoro (1988). Sankei does ship overseas, and their products are available for purchase from Amazon Japan.

[h/t RocketNews24]

All images courtesy of Sankei.

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8 City Maps Rendered in the Styles of Famous Artists
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iStock

Vincent van Gogh once famously said, "I dream my painting and I paint my dream." If at some point in his career he had dreamed up a map of Amsterdam, where he lived and derived much of his inspiration from, it may have looked something like the one below.

In a blog post from March, Credit Card Compare selected eight cities around the world and illustrated what their maps might look like if they had been created by the famous artists who have roots there.

The Andy Warhol-inspired map of New York City, for instance, is awash with primary colors, and the icons representing notable landmarks are rendered in his famous Pop Art style. Although Warhol grew up in Pittsburgh, he spent much of his career working in the Big Apple at his studio, dubbed "The Factory."

Another iconic and irreverent artist, Banksy, is the inspiration behind London's map. Considering that the public doesn't know Banksy's true identity, he remains something of an enigma. His street art, however, is recognizable around the world and commands exorbitant prices at auction. In an ode to urban art, clouds of spray paint and icons that are a bit rough around the edges adorn this map of England's capital.

For more art-inspired city maps, scroll through the photos below.

[h/t Credit Card Compare]

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Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
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There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

A hidden image illustration by Gergely Dudás, a.k.a. Dudolf
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

Gergely Dudás is at it again. The Hungarian illustrator, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his hidden image illustrations, going back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015. In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. For his latest brainteaser, which he posted to both his Facebook page and his blog, Dudolf is asking fans to find a pet ghost named Sheet in a field of white bunny rabbits.

As we’ve learned from his past creations, what makes this hidden image difficult to find is that it looks so similar to the objects surrounding it that our brains just sort of group it in as being “the same.” So you’d better concentrate.

If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding.

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