CableTV.com
CableTV.com

The Most Popular Reality TV Show in Each State

CableTV.com
CableTV.com

In what seems like no time at all, reality television has gone from being a guilty pleasure to something worth setting a reminder for. Now that there are reality shows entering double-digit seasons and others that have spawned multiple spin-offs, reality TV has more than established itself as a real genre, and fans have pledged their unwavering devotion. To see just where those loyalties lie, CableTV.com analyzed Google Trends data to create a map that details each state's favorite reality show.

According to the map, Hoarders leads the pack as the favorite reality series in five states while Shark Tank and America's Next Top Model claim four states apiece. Keeping Up With the Kardashians is the favorite show in its home state of California (Arizona loves it, too), while Pawn Stars owns Nevada, where it is based. But location isn't everything: Long Island Medium is reportedly the most popular reality show in Delaware, but not in New York (the Empire State prefers Ru Paul's Drag Race, though Mob Wives and Long Island Medium round out the top three).

"Generally, viewers love to indulge in reality shows that reflect their own regional interests," according to CableTV.com. On its website, the company also listed each state's top three shows and included facts about the states to provide context for the kinds of people who are watching each show. "California is in the top three [states] nationally for income and median house price, so they know a thing or two about how it feels to keep up with the Kardashians," CableTV writes.

Map courtesy of CableTV.com

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From Crab Cakes to Pepperoni Rolls: The Most Iconic Dish in Every State
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iStock

Each state has a particular dish or dishes that residents hold especially dear to their hearts. West Virginians are evangelical about pepperoni rolls. Residents of Maine and Connecticut are territorial about their lobster rolls. Colorado makes license plates featuring the pueblo chile. Regional foods inspire incredible loyalty, and though you may be able to find the same chain restaurants in every state, certain foods are indelibly linked to their birthplace.

The team behind Flavored Nation—an event devoted to dishes from all 50 states that’s debuting in Columbus, Ohio in August 2018—put together the map below showing every state’s most iconic food. The dishes were chosen based on independent research, input from social media, and discussions with state tourism boards. Come August, Flavored Nation will bring chefs from all over the country to Columbus to make these dishes during the two-day event.

A map of the U.S. with a photo of a regional food placed within each state
Flavored Nation

On the map you’ll see familiar foods like deep dish pizza, Nashville hot chicken, and Philly cheese steaks alongside less-popular dishes like knoephla (a type of dumpling) in North Dakota, Idaho's finger steaks (battered and deep-fried strips of steak), and Kansas's sour cream and raisin pie.

Some picks may surprise you, like the Coney dog—which isn’t native to Coney Island in New York, but is a Michigan delicacy that involves hot dogs smothered in ground beef. Others are disappointingly mainstream, like Missouri’s barbecue or Iowa’s corn dogs.

The longer you look at the map, the hungrier you’ll get, so you might as well just start planning a road trip so you can try all these snacks for yourself.

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Interactive Map Shows Where Your House Would Have Been 750 Million Years Ago
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iStock

Your neighborhood traveled a long way over several hundred million years to reach the spot it occupies today. To trace that journey over the ages, check out Ancient Earth, an interactive digital map spotted by Co.Design.

Ancient Earth, a collaboration between engineer and Google alum Ian Webster and Paleomap Project creator C.R. Scotese, contains geographical information for the past 750 million years. Start at the beginning and you'll see unrecognizable blobs of land. As you progress through the ages, the land mass Pangaea gradually breaks apart to form the world map we're all familiar with.

To make the transition even more personal, you can enter your street address to see where it would have been located in each period. Five hundred million years ago, for example, New York City was a small island in the southern hemisphere isolated from any major land mass. Around the same time, London was still a part of Pangaea, and it was practically on top of the South Pole. You can use the arrows on your keyboard to flip through the eras or jump from event to event, like the first appearance of multicellular life or the dinosaur extinction.

As you can see from the visualization, Pangaea didn't break into the seven continents seamlessly. Many of the long-gone continents that formed in the process even have names.

[h/t Co.Design]

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