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Airbnb

Book a Night at the Smallest House on Airbnb

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Airbnb

Guests paying a visit to this Boston Airbnb better pack lightly. As the Boston Globe reports, the artist behind the cozy space describes it as "the smallest house in the world."

Sculptor Jeff Smith credits the tiny house movement as the inspiration behind his pint-sized dwelling. But while traditional tiny homes typically range from 100 to 400 square feet, Smith's creation is a mere 25 square feet total.

Despite its size, the structure boasts many of the same amenities you'd find in a regular home—with some limitations. Guests have access to running water through a sink connected to a refillable water bottle. Once they're finished using it, any leftover water is deposited into flower boxes outside. The home also features a propane-powered stovetop, a skylight, six porthole windows, and a "toilet" (or a covered hole above a drawer of kitty litter).

Visitors—who can reserve a spot now for $55 a night—will still have to make do without several of the comforts we take for granted. While the home has a space to prop your laptop, WiFi is not included. It lacks heat and air conditioning as well, so the summer and winter months may not be the best times to book your stay.

If guests are unhappy with the home's location, they're free to move it elsewhere. The house comes on wheels, and according to the Airbnb page it's small enough to fit inside "a regular-sized van."

The project originally began as an art piece, but Smith now tells the Globe he's excited to see how it can function as a living space: "I want to see how it goes with someone renting this place out, and hear back from them and see what they say."

[h/t The Boston Globe]

All images courtesy of Airbnb.

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This Russian Kindergarten Looks Just Like a Castle
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YouTube

A group of lucky kindergarteners in Russia don’t have to wear poufy dresses or plastic crowns to pretend they’re royalty. As Atlas Obscura reports, all they have to do is go to school.

In a rural area of Russia's Leninsky District sits a massive, pastel-colored schoolhouse that was built to resemble Germany's famed Neuschwanstein Castle. It has turrets and gingerbread-like moldings—and instead of a moat, the school offers its 150 students multiple playgrounds, a soccer field, a garden, and playhouses.

Tuition is 21,800 rubles (about $360) a month, but the Russian government subsidizes it to make it less expensive for parents. As for the curriculum: it’s designed to promote social optimism, and each month’s lesson plan is themed. (September, for example, will be career-focused.)

Take a video tour of the school below, or learn more on the school’s website.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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architecture
This Chinese Library's Interior Is Designed to Look Like an Infinite Tunnel of Books
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The Chinese city of Yangzhou is known for its graceful arched bridges and proximity to the Yangtze River and the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal. Architects kept these unique local features in mind while designing Zhongshuge Yangzhou, a new bookstore and library that was completed in 2016.

Designed by Shanghai studio XL-Muse Architects, the building has black, mirrored floors and arched ceilings that symbolize Yangzhou’s famous waterways and overpasses. The floor reflects the store’s curving shelves to create the illusion of a never-ending tunnel of books—a true bibliophile’s dream.

Learn more about Yangzhou’s unique library/bookstore below, courtesy of Great Big Story.

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