Jeni's
Jeni's

Jeni's Wants to Replace Your Vanilla Ice Cream With Ylang Ylang

Jeni's
Jeni's

Thanks to a bad harvest in Madagascar last year, vanilla prices are surging upward, and ice cream lovers may have to deal with the fallout. Vanilla is already one of the most expensive spices in the world, and according to The Guardian, Madagascan vanilla prices increased by 150 percent last year.

So it may be time to start shopping around for a new go-to flavor. Jeni Britton Bauer, of the ice cream company Jeni’s, proposes using another flower with a complex flavor: the ylang ylang. Also known as the cananga tree, it’s native to parts of Southeast Asia, and valued for its flowery scent (it’s the key to Chanel No. 5) and essential oil.

Tomorrow, Jeni’s will release its new Early Summer collection and with it, a new Ylang Ylang & Fennel ice cream (though the brand has tested out other ylang ylang ice creams before). The company describes the new variety as a complex whirl of nectar-y, spicy, and earthy flavors.

Jeni's

"I think it presses some of the same buttons as a vanilla but with none of the smokiness," Bauer says of the taste of ylang ylang in an email to mental_floss. "It pairs exceptionally with sweet fennel. It reminds me of the scent of the air when you walk into a house that has a big bunch of lilies on the dining room table." Other flavors that she thinks might fill a vanilla-flavored hole in your palate include fenugreek, a plant whose seeds can often be found in Indian cuisine, and Peru balsam, a tree-resin-based essential oil known for having a sweet, vanilla-y smell. Both, naturally, will appear in a Jeni's holiday flavor later this year.

For what it’s worth, Jeni’s vanilla ice cream uses beans from Uganda rather than Madagascar, from a farm that specifically reserves a crop for the company, so vanilla probably won’t be disappearing from Jeni’s flavor selections anytime soon. (Bauer calls it "the perfect ice cream flavor," citing the similarities between the scent notes of vanilla, sweet cream, and sugar.) Even so, the threat of a global vanilla shortage is a pretty good reason to try a whole bunch of new ice cream flavors.

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Ice Water Games, YouTube
5 Smartphone Games That Let You Tend Plants and Chill Out
Ice Water Games, YouTube
Ice Water Games, YouTube

Being in nature is naturally relaxing, but city-dwellers don’t always have an opportunity to get outside. Gardening can be therapeutic for mental health, but you may not have access to a garden—or even the space to tend a houseplant. You can still have a few moments of horticultural meditation every day. It will just have to be digital.

Over the last few years, video game developers have released a number of mobile games that revolve around the simple act of tending to plants. These games are, for the most part, slow-moving, meditative experiences that focus on beautiful graphics, calming soundtracks, and low-key challenges. They’re a great way to de-stress and pursue your gardening dreams, no watering can required.

Here are five relaxing, plant-centric phone games you can download now.

1. VIRIDI; FREE

Viridi is like Neopets for plants. The game is dedicated to nurturing a pot of succulents that grow almost in real time. You can plant a variety of succulent species in your virtual pot. Spritz your plants with water when they’re thirsty and wait for them to grow. Each week, a new seedling will be available for you to plant. The game moves slowly by design. You can let it run in the background, and your plants will do their thing, just like a real plant would. These ones are even harder to kill than real succulents, though.

Find it: iOS, Android

2. TOCA NATURE; $2.99

Toca Boca makes games for kids, but honestly, Toca Nature is pretty fun no matter what your age. You can create your own natural landscapes, adding trees, water features, and mountains. Different natural features attract different animals, and the type of landscape you make shapes whether you’ll get bears, beavers, or birds living there. You can collect berries, feed the animals, or just enjoy planting trees.

Find it: iOS, Android

3. BREATH OF LIGHT: RELAXING PUZZLER; $1.99

In Breath of Light, your job is to bring a garden to life by manipulating a stream of light. Move rocks and mirrors around your zen garden to harness and direct the life-giving light emanating from a single flower. When the light hits another flower, it causes that plant to grow. The very simple puzzles are designed to help you chill out, and the award-winning soundtrack by the audio designer Winterpark features binaural tones that are naturally relaxing. “As a unique, gamified version of guided meditation, Breath of Light helps you enter a state of calm serenity without you even noticing,” according to Killscreen. Sorry, Android users—the app seems to have disappeared from Google Play, but it’s still available for iPhone.

Find it: iOS

4. PRUNE; $3.99

Prune is a puzzle game with a horticultural twist. The object is to plant a tree, then as it grows up, guide it with careful pruning, helping the branches reach the light while staying away from the cold shadows or hot sun, both of which will kill the tree. As the levels rise, you’ll need to contort your trees into ever more complex shapes.

Find it: iOS, Android

5. EUFLORIA; $4.99

If you like your gardening to be a little more high-stakes, Eufloria is out of this world. Seriously, it’s about colonizing asteroids. Your mission is to grow trees on far-off asteroids, sending your seedlings out to turn gray space rocks into thriving landscapes. Your seeds hop from asteroid to asteroid at your behest, creating a chain of fertile life. Sometimes, alien enemies will attack your flourishing asteroid colonies, but don’t worry; you can beat them back with the power of more seeds. The game can be fast-paced and competitive, but there’s a “relaxed” play option that’s more meditative.

Find it: iOS, Android

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National Gallery of Victoria
Yayoi Kusama's Flower-Filled Installation Has Art Lovers Seeing Red
National Gallery of Victoria
National Gallery of Victoria

"Subtle" would probably be the last word one would use to describe the work of 89-year-old artist Yayoi Kusama. Her larger-than-life installations tend to feature loud colors, funhouse-esque mirrors, and frenzied patterns—and her latest work is no exception.

Her installation, Flower Obsession, was specially commissioned for the Melbourne-based National Gallery of Victoria's Triennial, an art event supported by the government of Victoria, Australia that ran from December through April. Gallery organizers said they counted 1.2 million visitors at the Triennial, making it the most visited exhibition in the gallery's 157-year history.

Many people came just to get a glimpse of Kusama's color-crazed world. As My Modern Met reports, gallery-goers were invited to stick faux daisies onto the walls and surfaces of an otherwise drab space made to look like the inside of an apartment. Eventually, a sea of 550,000 red flowers engulfed everything in sight, from light fixtures to chairs to a toilet. Up until April 15, 2018, only those in attendance got an up-close look at this evolving installation. But new images, released by the National Gallery of Victoria, are giving art lovers around the world the chance to see this amazing piece for themselves.

A portrait of Yayoi Kusama wearing a red wig
Artist Yayoi Kusama
National Gallery of Victoria

A doorway covered in flowers
National Gallery of Victoria

A kitchen covered in flowers
National Gallery of Victoria

A living room covered in flowers
National Gallery of Victoria

A flower-covered toilet
National Gallery of Victoria

Kusama explained her inspiration prior to the show's opening:

"One day, after gazing at a pattern of red flowers on the tablecloth, I looked up to see that the ceiling, the windows, and the columns seemed to be plastered with the same red floral pattern," she said in a statement. "I saw the entire room, my entire body, and the entire universe covered with red flowers, and in that instant, my soul was obliterated."

In the past, Kusama has spoken out about her experience with mental illness and the hallucinations she's had since childhood, many of which have inspired her work. "My nets grew beyond myself and beyond the canvases I was covering with them," she once said. "They began to cover the walls, the ceiling, and finally the whole universe." Kusama has voluntarily lived in a psychiatric facility in Tokyo since 1977.

Flower Obsession isn't the first time Kusama has introduced the concept of "obliterating" a space. For a previous installation, visitors were encouraged to place colorful polka dots on the white walls of a room. To see this installation and others by Kusama, check out the photos below.

A room covered in polka dot stickers
The Obliteration Room (2017)
Alex Wong, Getty Images


Longing for Eternity (2017)
Timothy A. Clary, AFP/Getty Images

An installation using pumpkin shapes and mirrors
Infinity Mirrored Room (2017)
Alex Wong, Getty Images


Infinity Mirrored Room—Filled with the Brilliance of Life (2014)
Karim Sahib, AFP/Getty Images

[h/t My Modern Met]

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