In a 2015 American Customer Satisfaction Index survey of more than 300 consumer companies, 70,000 people rated their impressions on a scale of 1 to 100. BP, which was responsible for a catastrophic oil spill, did not fare well. 1-800-Flowers, which sometimes failed to deliver flowers, was another black mark. But Time Warner Cable’s score of 51 made it the least-liked, least-trusted, and lowest-scoring brand of them all.

That might be one reason why Charter Communications, which is in the final stages of purchasing the Internet and cable provider for $55.1 billion, is expected to wipe the much-maligned name from existence. Charter spokesman Alex Dudley told Advertising Age that the Time Warner Cable identifier will be phased out as part of a rebranding effort, to be replaced with Charter as a company name and Spectrum for products and services.

While it remains to be seen whether customers will see this as a sign of improved service, it won’t be the first time a business has had to perform a brand facelift owing to negative publicity. Tobacco merchants Philip Morris changed their name to Altria in 2003; a Belgian chocolate manufacturer settled on Libeert in 2014 after their original name became problematic. They were selling chocolates under the name ISIS.

[h/t Advertising Age]