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10 Star Wars Toys You Might Own That Are Now Worth a Fortune

When it comes to movie-themed toy tie-ins, no film will ever compare to Star Wars. In the nearly four decades since the first film hit theaters, almost every character, vehicle, and location from the franchise has been made into a figure or playset, and kid and adult fans alike purchased—and continue to buy—as many as they could afford. In honor of Star Wars Day, we decided to take a look at some of the figures that you may have owned that are now worth a fortune. To do so, we enlisted the help of the man who literally wrote the book on the subject: Mark Bellomo, toy expert, mental_floss contributor and author of The Ultimate Guide to Vintage Star Wars Action Figures 1977-1985 (among many, many other books on toys).

Bellomo tells mental_floss that his love of the Star Wars universe began with the release of the first film in 1977; his connection to the toy line began the next year, when he got his first C-3PO figure. He now owns every vintage figure ever made, including the "impossible to find" Early Bird Certificate Package. With doubles and multiples of many figures and sets, Bellomo could not give a ballpark estimate of how many pieces are in his collection. Suffice it to say there are a lot, and some were harder to track down than others.

"It took me two years to obtain a sealed bag of foam 'trash' for the Death Star Space Station playset," Bellomo says. "As for crown jewels, I have about 150 to 250 mint on sealed card (MOSC) vintage Star Wars figures and a bunch of factory sealed playsets and vehicles, most of which never made it into The Ultimate Guide due to space restrictions."

According to Bellomo, there's usually a spike in vintage Star Wars figure prices when there's a major media tie-in (new films, cartoons, or shows made available on streaming platforms), but it's also a case of limited supply and high demand; a lot of collectors want the toys, but the number of vintage figures is finite, which increases their value like a piece of fine art. Millions of figures have been produced over the years (the Kenner company shipped an estimated 250 million Star Wars figures by 1985), so what happened to most of them? "Think of it this way," Bellomo says. "How many people do you think would have bought a Star Wars figure in the spring of 1977 and saved it in its original packaging?" The answer is: Not very many, which is why mint condition versions of the 10 toys listed below are worth a fortune to collectors.

(And something to keep in mind: While the potential profits of selling these figures do sound impressive, they shouldn't be taken as a sign that we should all invest heavily in toys and wait for our dollars to multiply. "If you could go out right now and buy an action figure off the rack for $15, and turn around in a year and sell if for $30, everyone would be doing that," Bellomo says. "It doesn’t often work out that way.")

1. LARGE SIZE ARTOO-DETOO (R2-D2) (1978)

Original Retail Price: $7.99
Current Price Range: $675-$725+ (mint sealed in box)

Standing 7.5-inches tall, this wheeled figure featured a secret compartment that opened to reveal an electronic circuit card and plans for the Death Star. The value of this figure is highly dependent on the color: The white plastic commonly turns yellow when exposed to sunlight or heat, so the whiter this 38-year-old R2 unit is, the more he's worth.

2. SONIC CONTROLLED LAND SPEEDER (1978)

Original Retail Price: $10.97
Current Price Range: $1000-$1200+ (mint in sealed box)

According to Bellomo’s book, this figure was based on the land speeder Luke drove in A New Hope , but there was another, smaller land speeder figure that was not controlled by the R2-D2 remote (“clicker”). This version was only sold in J.C. Penney Christmas catalogs and cost $10.97, which is around $40 when adjusted for inflation. Paying that much for a toy in 1978 usually meant that it would leave the box, but the select few that remained untouched are now worth 100 times that high sticker price.

3. RADIO CONTROLLED JAWA SANDCRAWLER (1979)

Original Retail Price: $29.99
Current Price Range: $3000-$3200+ (mint in sealed box)

Slightly less menacing than the enormous Jawa Sandcrawler from Star Wars, this toy is still in high demand 37 years after its release, and 39 years since the vehicle first appeared on screen in Star Wars: A New Hope, Bellomo says. Even its removable pieces purchased alone are valuable: Elevator stairs and hatches can be found online for three times what the entire toy cost nearly four decades ago.

4. MILLENNIUM FALCON SPACESHIP (1979)

Original Retail Price: $29.99
Current Price Range: $2800-$3200 (mint in sealed box)

Pieces on pieces on pieces! This playset had a number of removable components, including weapons, a cockpit canopy windshield, a game table, landing gear, a secret compartment, and a lightsaber training set like the one Luke uses in the film. Finding all the pieces together is rare, but some sellers do offer accessories on their own. "With most '80s toys that possess a bevy of difficult-to-find accessories, more money can be made sometimes selling the toys piecemeal," Bellomo says. "With some vintage toys, an accessory or accoutrement may be worth more money than the entire shell/hull of the vehicle."

5. IMPERIAL ALL TERRAIN ARMORED TRANSPORT (AT-AT) (1981)

Original Retail Price: $49.99
Current Price Range: $825-$975+ (mint in sealed box)

A taller AT-AT was released in 2010 with more features than its 1981 counterpart, but collectors still crave the original, which had a D battery compartment, clicking guns, and posable legs.

6. STAR WARS: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK CLOUD CITY PLAYSET (1981)

Original Retail Price: $9.69
Current Price Range: $1200-$1550+ (mint sealed in box)

This rare set was sold only in the 1980 Sears Wish Book, so if your family belonged to that exclusive club, you may remember it. It came with a backdrop and four action figures: “Han Solo in his Bespin outfit, Lobot, Dengar, and Ugnaught.” This piece is valuable because the materials used to make it weren't necessarily built to last decades. "Most exclusive Star Wars toys constructed out of chipboard are getting more and more difficult to obtain on the secondary market," Bellomo says. "Star Wars is a multi-generational global brand: Every aficionado wants to own one of each piece from the vintage Star Wars line ... The Sears exclusive Cloud City Playset is getting more difficult to find in decent condition—and more expensive, too."

7. SLAVE-1 BOBA FETT SPACESHIP (1981)

Original Retail Price: $16.99
Current Price Range: $975-$1100+ (mint sealed in box)

This Kenner toy came with several removable parts, including Han Solo in carbonite, a tinted canopy, stabilizer fins, and a cargo ramp. Many removable parts meant a high probability that they would go missing once the figures were opened, which is why collectors seek out sealed boxes. "If 100,000 Slave-1 toys survived the early '80s, maybe about five to 10 percent of the extant samples survived from 1981 to 1984 in good condition with labels intact and looking sharp," Bellomo says. "Maybe a quarter of that five to 10 percent are absolutely complete with all of the respective parts. Most are missing the tinted canopy or the side hatch or the cargo ramp or the Han Solo in Carbonite Block accessory."

8. STAR WARS: DROIDS CARDBACK BOBA FETT (1985)

Original Retail Price: $2.99
Current Price Range: $2300 to $2600

When Bellomo wrote the prices for his guide between March and May of 2014, one of these mint condition figures in its original package (MOC, or "mint on card") was worth between $1250 and $1400—but the price has since skyrocketed because "it was produced in far fewer numbers, and the card artwork is uniquely different," he says. "Anything related to him is collectible." Boba Fett, who was first introduced (in animated form) in The Star Wars Holiday Special in 1978, remains one of the most popular characters in the Star Wars universe, and collectors are eager to obtain the gold-plated coin and jet black Imperial Blaster included with this figure.

9. STAR WARS: THE POWER OF THE FORCE ANAKIN SKYWALKER WITH SILVER COIN (1985)

Original Retail Price: $2.99
Current Price Range: $2600-$3000

The coin itself is worth $100 or more in mint condition, but owning the figure mint on card with the silver coin can mean a much nicer payday, depending on the condition of the packaging.

10. LEGO STAR WARS ULTIMATE COLLECTOR’S EDITION MILLENNIUM FALCON (2007)


Original Retail Price: $500
Current Price Range: $2500-$4500+

This limited edition set has more than 5100 pieces and included minifigures of Han, Chewie, Leia, Obi-Wan, and Luke. Believed to be the second largest LEGO set of all time (behind the Taj Mahal set that was released in 2008), it was not cheap to begin with, and even a completely constructed version will set you back more than $1000 on the secondary market today.

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Rich Fury, Getty Images
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Watch Mark Hamill Sing in German in This Bizarre 1980 Star Wars Parody
Rich Fury, Getty Images
Rich Fury, Getty Images

In today’s social media-driven world, where everyone’s got a camera on their smartphone, celebrities know that it’s impossible to get away with anything. Unfortunately for them, and fortunately for us, that same technology has made it possible to dredge up embarrassing moments of the past, as Mark Hamill knows all too well.

As if the easy availability of The Star Wars Holiday Special weren’t bad enough, one Star Wars fan reminded Hamill—and the world—of a bizarre 1980 appearance the Luke Skywalker actor made on a German variety show, where he drifted in on an animated moon. And sang. In German.

Ever the good sport, Hamill took to Twitter to recall his own memory of the appearance, only to conclude that his final thought was: “Who cares? No one outside of Germany will ever see this!”

Thankfully, there's no Jedi mind trick to erase this appearance from your memory.

[h/t: The Daily Dot]

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Jonathan Olley // Lucasfilm
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20 Star Wars Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life
Jonathan Olley // Lucasfilm
Jonathan Olley // Lucasfilm

While most of the Star Wars saga has been filmed on sound stages in England and Australia, the filmmakers behind the ongoing space opera have sometimes traveled to real-life places to create the alien worlds of a galaxy far, far away. Here are 20 Star Wars movie locations you can visit in real life.

1. AJIM, TUNISIA

George Lucas used various locations around Tunisia to film exteriors for the desert planet Tatooine, most notably the ferry port town of Ajim. The town was used for the exteriors of Obi-Wan Kenobi’s home, which was actually an old mosque, plus the Mos Eisley Spaceport in A New Hope.

2. THE HÔTEL SIDI DRISS // MATMATAT-AL-QADIMAL, TUNISIA

The Hôtel Sidi Driss in Matmatat-Al-Qadimal, Tunisia was used as the Lars homestead (Luke Skywalker’s childhood home) in A New Hope. The hotel consists of five pits, four of them reserved for lodging and sleeping, the fifth dubbed the “Star Wars pit.” Guests can dine in the Lars family dining room, now the hotel’s restaurant. The set dressings were removed after filming in 1976, but returned in the year 2000 in order to film scenes for Attack of the Clones. Ever since, the decorations have remained. Fittingly, it's more commonly known as the "Star Wars hotel."

3. DEATH VALLEY NATIONAL PARK, CALIFORNIA

George Lucas used Death Valley National Park for pickup shots after shooting in Tunisia for A New Hope and Return of the Jedi. The area between Sierra Nevada and the Mojave Desert, along with Tunisia, were used to make the desert planet of Tatooine come to life, most notably in the scene when Obi-Wan Kenobi meets Luke Skywalker, C-3PO, and R2-D2 for the first time.

For Return of the Jedi, Twenty Mule Team Canyon in Death Valley was used to film the scene in which C-3PO and R2-D2 travel to Jabba's Palace.

4. HARDANGERJØKULEN GLACIER, NORWAY

The Empire Strikes Back's snowy opening battle scene on the ice planet Hoth was filmed on the Hardangerjøkulen Glacier, the sixth largest glacier in Norway.

5. FINSE, NORWAY

At the foot of the Hardangerjøkulen glacier is the small railroad town of Finse, Norway, which is located between Oslo and Bergen, and was used as the Rebel Alliance’s Echo Base on Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back. While shooting in 1979, a snowstorm hit the small town, allowing director Irvin Kershner to shoot two key scenes: Luke Skywalker's escape from the Wampa cave, as well as the young hero's interaction with the spirit of Obi-Wan Kenobi before he is rescued by Han Solo. Both scenes were shot just outside of the Finse 1222 Hotel.

6. TIKAL NATIONAL PARK // TIKAL, GUATEMALA

In A New Hope, Lucas used ancient Mayan ruins, located in Guatemala's Tikal National Park, as the exterior of the Rebel Alliance’s Massassi Outpost.

7. YUMA DESERT, ARIZONA

Instead of returning to Tunisia for Return of the Jedi, the film's producers chose to shoot Buttercup Valley in Arizona's Yuma Desert for the Sarlacc Pit sequence. Jabba's Sail Barge and the Sarlacc Pit took more than five months to build, and more than 5500 cast and crew members lodged in Yuma during filming in 1982.

8. REDWOOD NATIONAL AND STATE PARKS, CALIFORNIA

California's Redwood National and State Parks portrayed the Forest Moon of Endor, the Ewoks’ home world, in Return of the Jedi. Several scenes, such as the speeder bike chase and the Ewok ambush, were shot in the parks’ many redwood groves in Marin County, which is close to Lucas’s home at Skywalker Ranch.

9. GRINDELWALD, SWITZERLAND

Most of Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith were shot at Fox Studios Australia in Sydney using green screen. However, Lucas would occasionally send crews out to capture scenery in various locations around the world for the plate photography used in background shots.

One of the real-life places shot for Revenge of the Sith was the beautiful mountain range of Grindelwald, Switzerland, which was used as the backdrop for the planet Alderaan, Princess Leia’s home.

10. VILLA DEL BALBIANELLO // LENNO, ITALY

The Lake Retreat where Anakin Skywalker and Padme Amidala go into hiding in Attack of the Clones is located at the Villa del Balbainello in Lenno, Italy. Originally built in 1787, the villa overlooks Lake Como and served as a monastery before it was turned over to the National Trust of Italy in 1988. Villa del Balbainello makes another appearance at the end of Attack of the Clones, as the location for Anakin and Padme’s wedding.

11. ROYAL PALACE OF CASERTA // CASERTA, ITALY


The Palace of Caserta in southern Italy, just northeast of Napoli, was used to shoot the interiors of the Theed Royal Palace on Naboo in The Phantom Menace and Attack of the Clones. Originally built for Bourbon King Charles III in the 1750s, the Palace of Caserta is also the largest royal residence in the world.

12. PHANG NGA BAY // PHUKET, THAILAND

The beautiful island backdrop of Phang Nga Bay in Thailand was used as plate photography for the planet Kashyyyk, Chewbacca’s birthplace, in Revenge of the Sith. For certain scenes, shots of Guilin, China were combined with Phang Nga Bay.

13. WHIPPENDELL WOOD // WATFORD, ENGLAND

Lucas used England's Whippendell Wood for two scenes in The Phantom Menace: In the first instance, it's where Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi meet Jar-Jar Binks; the other shows the Wood as a sacred place for Jar-Jar's species, the Gungans.

14. PLAZA DE ESPAÑA // SEVILLE, SPAIN

The beautiful Plaza de España in Seville, Spain was used for the exterior of Theed on Naboo in Attack of the Clones. Anakin and Padme walk through the plaza before the pair go into hiding in the Lake Country.

15. MOUNT ETNA // SICILY, ITALY

Hayden Christensen and Ewan McGregor in 'Revenge of the Sith'
Lucasfilm

Although Lucas actually didn’t shoot on Mount Etna, his team used Italy’s most active volcano for plate photography for the epic light saber battle between Obi-Wan and Anakin at the end of Revenge of the Sith. Mount Etna was actually erupting during filming, so Lucas sent a film crew to capture its flowing lava.

16. SKELLIG MICHAEL, IRELAND

Daisy Ridley in 'Star Wars: The Last Jedi'
Lucasfilm

The island planet of Ahch-To, which the exiled Luke Skywalker called home at the end of The Force Awakens, is actually the island of Skellig Michael, which is located about 7 miles off the southwest coast of Ireland. Around 600 CE, a group of monks built a monastery that sits more than 600 feet above sea level, along with hundreds of rock steps to reach the top. Today, it’s a popular tourist attraction for Star Wars fans because it’s where Rey received her Jedi training in The Last Jedi.

17. RUB' AL KHALI DESERT // ABU DHABI, UAE

Daisy Ridley in 'Star Wars: The Force Awakens'
Lucasfilm

From Rey’s scavenger marketplace to Poe Dameron and Finn’s crash landing in The Force Awakens, the desert planet of Jakku was filmed in a large section of the Rub' al Khali desert known as “The Empty Quarter,” which is located a few hours away from Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The Star Wars cast and crew filmed for six months in the largest contiguous sand desert in the world under the production title “Avco,” named after the L.A. movie theater where director J.J. Abrams watched the original Star Wars for the first time in 1977.

18. SALAR DE UYUNI // POTOSÍ, BOLIVIA

Located near the crest of the Andes is Salar de Uyuni, the Earth’s largest salt flat. It stretches more than 4000 square miles across southwest Bolivia and was used as the filming location for Crait, a mineral planet covered in white salt and red soil where the Resistance held its last stand against the First Order in The Last Jedi. The salt flat was created when prehistoric lakes dried up during the last Ice Age and left more than 10 billion tons of natural salt behind.

19. LAAMU ATOLL, MALDIVES

A still from 'Rogue One'
Industrial Light & Magic, a division of Lucasfilm Entertainment

During the climax of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, the Rebel Alliance, led by Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), breaks into an Imperial Base located on the planet Scarif to steal the top secret blueprints for the Death Star.

Director Gareth Edwards used Gan and Berasdhoo—two very large islands in the Laamu Atoll island cluster in the Maldives—as the filming location for Scarif, a remote tropical planet in the Outer Rim. "Scarif is based on a paradise world, so we had to go to paradise to film it," Edwards said during Star Wars Celebration in 2016.

In addition, the interior of the Imperial Security Complex on Scarif was mostly filmed in the Canary Wharf Underground Station in London, England. Film crews worked on an exciting chase scene through the subway station between midnight and 4 a.m. when it was closed to the public.

20. DUBROVNIK, CROATIA

In The Last Jedi, Canto Bight is a casino city on the planet Cantonica, where Finn and Rose embark on a mission to find a master codebreaker to disable the First Order’s new weapon. Director Rian Johnson used the walled seaside city of Dubrovnik, Croatia as the filming location for the lavish city.

Dubrovnik, which is known as the “Pearl of the Adriatic,” was also used as the filming location for King’s Landing on Game of Thrones. So the Croatian city gets double the nerd cred for Game of Thrones and Star Wars fans alike.

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