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Playing Cards Pay Homage to Groundbreaking Women in History

Earlier this week, Donald Trump told a group of supporters: “If Hillary Clinton were a man, I don’t think she’d get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she’s got going is the woman’s card.”

In reply, Clinton told her supporters: “Mr. Trump accused me of playing the ‘woman card.’ Well, if fighting for women’s health care, and paid family leave, is playing the woman card, then deal me in.”

Later that night, Every Voice communications director Adam Smith tweeted this question:

… which was then spotted by Iowa City-based siblings Zach and Zebby Wahls. They took that idea and launched a Kickstarter for "The Woman Card[s]," a set of playing cards featuring pioneering women. It was funded in less than five hours, and has now raised nearly $20,000 (its original goal was $5000) with 31 days to go (at the time of writing). The internet moves fast, huh?

The cards are sketched by Zebby, who is currently finishing up a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at the University of Iowa. The first sketch was of course, Clinton (the ace in the deck), followed by the queen, Beyonce. While all the figures have yet to be drawn, the full deck has been selected and includes figures like Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as the king, along with Clara Barton, Amelia Earhart, Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony and more.

While the idea is a fun take on politics, the Wahls write on their Kickstarter page that it “isn't just a novelty,” but a way to honor the achievements of female trailblazers in a variety of fields.

While the project is not affiliated with the Clinton campaign, the siblings are supporters of the candidate and a portion of the profit will go to support Hillary for America. The Wahls wrote that Clinton’s people told them that they have something similar in development, so bone up on your favorite two-deck card game and get reading to draw a hand of awesome women from history.

The Woman Card[s] will likely be shipped starting in early July (plenty of time before the big election) and you can check them out here.

[h/t Zach Wahls on Twitter]

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crime
German Police Tried to Fine Someone $1000 for Farting at Them
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Thomas Lohnes/Getty Images for IMG

In Berlin, passing gas can cost you. Quite a lot, actually, in the case of a man accused of disrespecting police officers by releasing a pair of noxious farts while being detained by the police. As CityLab reports, Berlin’s police force has recently been rocked by a scandal hinging on the two farts of one man who was asked to show his ID to police officers while partying on an evening in February 2016.

The man in question was accused of disrespecting the officers involved by aiming his flatulence at a policewoman, and was eventually slapped with a fine of 900 euros ($1066) in what local media called the "Irrer-Pups Prozess," or "Crazy Toot Trial." The errant farter was compelled to show up for court in September after refusing to pay the fine. A judge dismissed the case in less than 10 minutes.

But the smelly situation sparked a political scandal over the police resources wasted over the non-crime. It involved 18 months, 23 public officials, and 17 hours of official time—on the taxpayers’ dime. Officials estimate that those two minor toots cost taxpayers more than $100, which is chump change in terms of city budgets, but could have been used to deal with more pressing criminal issues.

[h/t CityLab]

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In 1909, a Door-to-Door Catnip Salesman Incited a Riot in New York
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iStock

In 1909, New York City businessman G. Herman Gottlieb was looking for a way to make a quick buck. He found it in a wooded section of Northern Manhattan, where wild catnip grew. After harvesting two baskets full of the plant, Gottlieb headed downtown to Harlem, intending to sell the product to residents with pampered felines.

As the history blog The Hatching Cat recounts, what Gottlieb didn’t know was that the neighborhood was also home to plenty of feral cats with voracious appetites. As Gottlieb made his way around the neighborhood, a handful of stray cats seized upon some leaves that had fallen out of his basket and began writhing and rolling around on the ground. Soon, even more kitties joined in, and “jumped up at his baskets, rubbed themselves against his legs, mewing, purring, and saying complimentary things about him,” according to an August 19, 1909 article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Gottlieb tried to frighten the cats away, according to The Washington Times’s account of the event, but the persistent animals wouldn’t budge. “All of them, rich and poor, aristocrats from the sofa cushions near the front windows and thin plebians from the areaways struggled mightily to get into the two baskets of catnip,” the Times wrote. Soon, Gottlieb found himself surrounded by somewhere between 30 and 40 cats, each one of them clamoring for his goods.

When he eventually spotted a policeman, Gottlieb thought he’d found an ally against the cats. Instead, Sergeant John F. Higgins promptly arrested Gottlieb for inciting a crowd. (“Why don’t you arrest the catnip?” Gottlieb asked him, according to the Times. “That is collecting the crowd. Not I.”)

Trailed by several cats, Higgins and Gottlieb made their way to a police station on East 104th Street. But when they arrived, authorities couldn’t decide whether or not the salesman had actually broken any laws.

“We can’t hold this man,” Lieutenant Lasky, the officer who received the arrest report, said. “The law says a man must not cause a crowd of people to collect. The law doesn’t say anything about cats.”

“The law doesn’t say anything about people,” Higgins replied. “It says ‘a crowd.’ A crowd of cats is certainly a crowd.” Amid this debate, a station cat named Pete began fighting with the invading felines, and, with the help of some policemen, eventually drove the catnip-hungry kitties out of the building.

Gottlieb was eventually released, and even driven home in a patrol wagon—all while being chased by a few lingering cats, still hot on the trail of his now regrettable merchandise.

[h/t The Hatching Cat]

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