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6 Non-Margarita Drinks to Enjoy on Cinco de Mayo

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Tired of celebrating Cinco de Mayo with yet another margarita? Try these popular Mexican drinks, which go beyond lime and tequila.

1. LA PALOMA

If you don’t want to veer too far way away from the margarita, la paloma (which means "dove") is the drink for you: The refreshing beverage, which consists of tequila, grapefruit soda, and lime, even calls for salt on the rim. According to one theory, the drink is named after a popular folk song from the 1860s; another says it was named after "Cucurrucucu Paloma," a 1950s song written by Tomás Méndez and originally performed by Pedro Infante. No matter how it got its name, la paloma remains one of the most popular cocktails in Mexico. You can find a recipe here.

2. TEPACHE

Next time you eat a pineapple, save the rind, which you can use to make tepache. To make this traditional Mexican drink, throw the rind in a pot with piloncillo (unrefined sugar), some spices, and water; bring to a boil, then simmer; add ripe pineapple chunks; and let the whole concoction ferment for a few days. For a more alcoholic version, you then add a beer, wait a little longer, and enjoy. Tepache has its roots in the nahuatl word tapiatl, which means “drink made from corn”—the original base for this drink. You can find a recipe here.

3. MICHELADA

Sometimes referred to as the Mexican Bloody Mary, this drink is traditionally made with beer, lime, and various spices, and nowadays frequently features tomato juice as well. Depending on where you’re drinking it, it may also contain clamato juice, Worcestershire sauce, or Maggi seasoning. The Michelada may be named after Michel Esper, who created it at a bar, or Augusto Michel, a general in the Mexican Revolution who put hot sauce in his troops' beer. (In 2005, however, the owner of a michelada mix manufacturer claimed that he made up the Augusto Michel story to “add mystique to our product.”) But the most popular explanation is that Michelada is a combination of mi (my), chela (beer), and helada (iced): "my cold beer." You can find a recipe here.

4. TEJUINO

The precise origin of this fermented corn drink is unknown, but it dates back to pre-Columbian times and is usually associated with the state of Colima. And yes, it is fermented from the same corn dough (Masa) used to make tortillas. By boiling the dough with water and piloncillo until it's a thick liquid, vendors create a drink with either low or nonexistent alcohol content. It is frequently served on the streets of Colima combined with lime juice in a plastic cup or simply a bag with a straw in it.

5. PULQUE

This ancient yeasty beverage, made from the fermented sap of the maguey (agave plant), was popular in Mexico until the Spanish brought another yeasty drink over from Europe. Pulque was used in many ceremonies and the sap from the plant was believed to be the blood of the goddess Mayahuel. (One of the key differences between pulque and the other two famous agave drinks, tequila and mezcal, is that pulque is never distilled, and is instead left to ferment in fermentation houses known as tinacales.) Sour and yeast-like, pulque declined in popularity after beer came onto the scene, but it's recently enjoyed something of a comeback. You can find out how to make it yourself here.

6. COLONCHE

This bright red drink has been made in Mexico for thousands of years using the fermented prickly pear found on the cacti of the Opuntia genus mixed with sugar. It's made wherever nopal (the Mexican Spanish term for the plant) is abundant.

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New Pop Chart Lab Poster Is a Boozy Blueprint For Making Classic Cocktails
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Pop Chart Lab's posters combine design with data, and their latest offering—a full breakdown of the ingredients in 60 classic cocktails—is no exception. From the exact ratio of gin and tonic that should go into a G & T (2 ounces and 4 ounces, respectively) to the garnishes you'll need to make a proper Tom Collins (a maraschino cherry and a lemon twist), the 3-foot-by-2-foot "Constitutions of Classic Cocktails" artwork teaches mixology basics you'd typically learn in bartending school, sans tuition fee.

In addition to mainstays like the Negroni and the Whiskey Sour, the poster also includes relatively obscure drinks (ever heard of the Golden Dawn, or the Journalist?), which you can attempt after drinking your way through your favorite concoctions. Before you know it, you'll be explaining to your friends the intricacies of why you should stir martinis instead of shaking them (sorry, James Bond), or the difference between a highball and a Collins glass. Bottoms up!

"Constitutions of Classic Cocktails" costs $37, and is currently available for pre-order. Shipping begins on Friday, October 20, 2017. (To see the poster's details up close, visit Pop Chart Lab's website and click on the diagram.)

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Attention Beer Lovers: A London Brewery Is Hiring a Professional Taste-Tester
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Beer lovers aren’t given many chances to discuss their passion for imbibing at job interviews. But a new open position at London's Meantime Brewing Company lists that expertise as one of the top qualifications. As Fortune reports, the brewery is seeking a professional beer taster to help improve its products.

The brewery’s part-time employee will “join the panel brewers as they taste, discuss, and pass opinion on a range of different beers,” according to the job listing on LinkedIn. On top of steady access to free booze three hours a week, the taster will receive a competitive salary “with beer benefits.” As the description reads: “Yes, this could just be the best job in the world.”

Meantime isn’t just considering any casual beer drinker for the role. Their ideal candidate will have a precise palate that can distinguish “chocolate malt from dark malt” and “Fuggles from Cascade hops.” They will also have an understanding of global consumer markets, a functioning knowledge of English, and an extensive beer vocabulary. The brewery is located in the London borough of Greenwich, so applicants who aren’t local should be willing to relocate.

Founded in 1999, the Meantime Brewing Company made its name on the beer scene with signature beverages like their London Lager, London Pale Ale, and Yakima Red. If you’re interested in joining the team, post 30 words on your LinkedIn profile explaining why you deserve the gig, along with any photos or videos that may help your case, with the hashtag #pickmemeantime. The company will narrow down the pool to three candidates for an in-person beer tasting before deciding their top pick. Meanwhile, you can prepare for the job by brushing up on your beer facts.

[h/t Fortune]

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