Music Box Films
Music Box Films

12 Outrageous Facts About Twisted Sister

Music Box Films
Music Box Films

Shock rockers Twisted Sister will forever be known for Dee Snider's confrontational personality, their outrageous costumes, and the chart-topping anthems "We're Not Gonna Take It" and "I Wanna Rock." The band's multi-platinum 1984 album, Stay Hungry, made them one of the biggest rock sensations of the 1980s, which was vindication after the group had duked it out in the clubs for more than a decade prior. They were a true example of the power of perseverance. The "overnight success" of Snider, original member/guitarist Jay Jay French, guitarist Eddie Ojeda, bassist Mark Mendoza, and the late drummer AJ Pero took longer than most people knew.

Director Andrew Horn recently unleashed a documentary profile of the glam agitators called We Are Twisted F**king Sister, which chronicles the band's slow rise. They began life in December 1972 as a New Jersey-based cover band called Silver Star featuring French, developed with the acquisition of songwriting frontman Snider and guitarist Ojeda in 1976, and landed the subsequent, long-awaited record deal in 1982 after the Snider lineup performed more than 2000 shows together.

In honor of the 40th anniversary of Snider’s arrival and the band’s current farewell tour, we spoke with Jay Jay French, who shared some wild and shocking facts about the pink-powered rock quintet.

1. A MURDER ALMOST TOOK PLACE BACKSTAGE.

During the original incarnation of the band, they were playing a gig in Adams, Massachusetts in December 1974 when a drunken roadie told singer Michael "Valentine" O'Neill that he felt disrespected by bass player Kenny Neill. Also inebriated, the frontman went looking for the bassist but found their drummer, Mell "Starr" Anderson, who told him to shut up. Heated words were exchanged, and Valentine—who had brought a rifle along so that he could go hunting in western Massachusetts—grabbed the weapon after the drummer said, "Michael, what are you gonna do? Kill me?"

"It was at that moment when I walked into the room and saw him standing with the gun aimed at Mel," guitarist Jay Jay French tells mental_floss. "I said to myself, 'Oh my God, he's going to kill him. He's really going to kill him.' Listen, to Michael's credit and to the credit of everybody, he obviously didn't do anything. He threw the gun down, then they started fighting. Michael was so drunk he could've pulled the trigger and it could've been a disaster. And he did not. Then the roadie who instigated the affair screamed, 'I broke up Twisted Sister!' And ran out of the club and started running back to New Jersey barefoot. It was freezing cold. He was obviously drunk and high. We piled into our cars and caught up to him two miles down the road and brought him back."

2. FANS DEMOLISHED FOUR CLUBS AT THE BAND'S REQUEST.

Twisted Sister played on the last night that Hammerheads, a rock club on Long Island, was going to be open. As French recalls: "The club owner said, 'By the way, we're closing tonight. I hate the landlord, and I don't really care what you tell people. Tell them to smash up the club.' It only further enhanced the band's crazy reputation, right?"

At the gig either Dee or Jay Jay (or both) told the crowd that it was the last night and to take everything. "People went to the bathrooms and took the stalls and the fire alarms," says French. "I thought that they would take little pieces of the wall. I didn't think they were going to actually remove the structural foundation of the building." They even brought down the false ceiling and caused the plumbing to burst and leak. The crew waded through the water to retrieve the band's gear.

Word spread about the unrehearsed demolition, and later three other New York and New Jersey club owners asked them to do the same at the 2001 Odyssey (where John Travolta's famous dance in Saturday Night Fever was filmed), the Soap Factory, and Emmett's Inn. At 2001, weapons were confiscated from fans who went through metal detectors. Wallpaper at the Soap Factory was torn off the walls, which were pure sheetrock—some of which came down, too. "But in no case did a club owner come to us and state any kind of disappointment that the room was destroyed any more than he wanted it to be, which I think is funny," says French.

3. A MEMBER WAS THREATENED WITH VIOLENCE OVER A BUSINESS DISPUTE.

According to French, after Twisted Sister recorded their self-released single "Under The Blade," the owner of Electric Lady Studios became angry because part of their production deal with producer Eddie Kramer included the clause that if the band got a deal, they had to pay four times the studio rate. Even though the band used the single as a promotional item, the studio owner bought a copy at a Sam Goody store in the spring of 1982, so he demanded $24,000 and reportedly threatened French with bodily harm if he didn't pay up.

"I was threatened directly by the owner," French states. "Then my manager, Mark Puma, and I called some club owner guys who he knew knew the right kind of people to call. Phone calls were made, conversations were had, which I was not privy to, but I was told that $10,000 would clear it. We were told that, out of respect, we should pay this. Out of respect? You mean out of desire to not have my knees broken? Okay. So we did."

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4. THE BAND HUNG AN EFFIGY OF BARRY WHITE ONSTAGE.

Twisted Sister and their fans loathed disco. At one point in the late '70s, frequent onstage chants of "Disco Sucks" were echoed by the audience while the group often displayed "Disco Sucks" banners onstage. But then they decided to take things to the next level by hanging an effigy of singer Barry White onstage and beating it to show their disdain for his music. They were very naive because they did not consider the wider racial implications of their actions. When one club owner in particular shared his positive views on lynching, the band was appalled.

"That scared us and taught us a lesson," says French. "We were bored to death in the bars and looking for things to do, things to say, and things to make people react. We fell prey to the mentality of crowd manipulations. After [the club owner] said that to us, not only did we stop doing it, but we also never played that room again. We didn't want to be associated with a guy like that."

5. AS A TEENAGER, JAY JAY FRENCH DROVE HIS NEIGHBORS CRAZY.

After buying his first big amp stack in 1969, French opened his windows and cranked his guitar loud and proud. Soon a neighbor was banging on his door. When she confronted him, she said she could hear him on 88th and Columbus. "I said, 'You live four blocks away? And you heard my guitar? Okay.'" he recalls. "And I slammed the door on her."

At another time, French took his amp and guitar to the roof and blasted all across the West Side of Manhattan while doing windmills. After trying to gesture to him to turn it down, and getting a middle finger in return, a neighbor in a penthouse two blocks away called the cops, who came up to the roof. "They basically said, 'Put the guitar down, and step away from the guitar,'" French recalls with amusement. "The guitar was reverberating all over the buildings. It was pretty funny."

6. SOMEONE ONCE SET THEIR TRUCK ON FIRE.

After renting trucks for a long time, Twisted Sister finally bought one, but they only had it for one day. They were playing their favorite club, Speaks, on Long Island in early 1978 when, mid-set, someone yelled, "Your truck's on fire!" They opened the door behind the stage to see their vehicle completely engulfed in flames. French recalls it was so hot that it was melting the adjacent truck belonging to another band. Luckily it did not explode and no one was hurt.

Two years later, he received a revelation about that night. The ex-wife of the son of a rival club owner walked up to him while he was playing Pac-Man at a bar in Westchester. "She said, 'I know about your truck being destroyed,'" French explains. "'You know your truck that was set on fire on Long Island a couple of years ago? That was my husband who did that. His dad told him to go do it.'"

French acknowledges that it was hearsay and speculation, but "it kind of made sense" given that this was the son of the racist club owner who liked their Barry White stunt. "It makes total sense now that it was done on purpose because the band stopped playing the venue [and cost them revenue]. The loop was closed, but I can't prove it."

7. THE HEAD OF THEIR RECORD LABEL HATED THEM. AT LEAST AT FIRST.

Twisted Sister were never critical darlings. Nor did the major labels like them. The list of reasons why record labels would not sign them included everything from the color of their pants to "been done before," but "there was never any acknowledgment that the band was super popular," says French.

When Atlantic Records' then-president Doug Morris found out that Phil Carson, the label's London-based senior vice president, had signed Twisted Sister during Christmas week of 1982, he was incensed. A&R man Jason Flom had been championing them for years to no avail. But after the band's second album (and Atlantic debut) You Can't Stop Rock 'n Roll sold 100,000 copies in 1983 with no label support, just constant touring, Morris called French into his office.

"He apologized to me," French says. The guitarist says that the label chief revealed to him that Warner Music and American Express owned MTV at that point. "He said, 'You make the right record and the right video and I'll make you the biggest band in the world.' I didn't buy it at all. What signaled that he wasn't full of it was that he hired [producer] Tom Werman, the hottest guy in town [for Stay Hungry]. He put his money where his mouth is."

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8. EVEN AS A LARGE CLUB DRAW, THE BAND LIVED NEAR THE POVERTY LEVEL FOR MANY YEARS.

Even though at the height of their pre-fame club popularity Twisted Sister could draw anywhere from 2000 to 3500 people to a gig, the group did not live large like other local stars. They put all their money back into the band. "I think our best year was $12,000 each in the bars because all the money went to the show, the equipment, demos, and the crew," French explains. "So we lived on near-poverty level wages the whole time because we understood that you had to put the money back in. With other bands, some guys bought houses and cars, we didn't. We took the least amount of money you could take to get by, and all the rest was invested. While we were definitely able to earn good money to keep the business going, that was never the key."

9. DESPITE ALL THE CRAZINESS AROUND THEM, THE BAND WAS SOBER.

A majority of Twisted Sister's members do not drink and none do drugs, and nobody ever drank to excess. They were laser focused on their music and achieving success. "We lost a lot of ex-members who did party and found it a very inhospitable place to work," French admits. "We were not a hospitable band if you partied. We were so straight that if you were f**ked up, you were out of the band."

The guitarist recalls that when the band held drinking contests onstage (to the point that some contestants got sick) in the late '70s, he had no idea how much booze he had been handing out. At one point, "The bartender said, 'I think you've handed out enough to kill somebody,'" he recalls. "I didn't know how much was enough to trash somebody. I had no idea."

10. DEE SNIDER WAS ARRESTED FOR OBSCENITY IN 1984.

The group was playing a show in Amarillo, Texas. They were a bar band that originally played to college-aged audiences, but with their platinum success in the summer of 1984 graduated to playing amphitheaters and arenas. Their poppy hit songs of that year belied the darker nature of their other material.

"Before I realized it, there was a large body of elementary school kids who were coming down with their parents to see that fun band," Snider told me for a Goldmine magazine interview in 1999. "I was still doing the same show that we were doing in biker bars in 1979." At one point, he cursed out a fan who was starting trouble. "This mother’s jaw hit the floor, and then she went and pressed charges."

Snider was arrested after the show, but the charges were dropped. "We, at the time, thought it was not a good thing to make a big issue out of it," the singer said. "In retrospect, I think we should have. The ACLU wanted to step in. Basically we just paid the minimal fine and the charges were dropped. It was disorderly conduct and abusive language, or something like that, whatever that means."

11. THE BAND CREATED A ZOMBIE VIDEO THAT WAS BANNED.

The group became a multiplatinum success in 1984 through two humorous videos starring Animal House actor Mark Metcalf ("We're Not Gonna Take It" and "I Wanna Rock"), and the debut single for their fourth studio album, 1985's Come Out And Play, was their cover of The Shangri-Las' tune "Leader Of The Pack," another upbeat and commercial track. While the album quickly achieved gold status with 500,000 copies sold, the band began losing momentum in late 1985/early 1986, so they did an about-face with the next video clip for the '50s-sounding single "Be Chrool To Your Scuel," a song that featured Alice Cooper, Brian Setzer, Billy Joel, and Clarence Clemons.

For the video, the band unleashed a tale of a teacher who daydreams that he and his fellow educators turn into Twisted Sister and preside over a school full of zombies.  The clip—which featured fellow shock rocker Cooper, comedian Bobcat Goldthwait, gory makeup guru Tom Savini, and reportedly a young Luke Perry (if you can spot him beneath his undead look)—was gruesomely funny but too graphic for MTV. The cable network subsequently banned it, which is unfortunate because it could have re-established Twisted Sister as an edgy band and less of a novelty at the time. True fans, however, knew the real deal.

12. FRENCH IS A BUSINESS COLUMNIST AND MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER.

For the last year, French has been penning a business column for Inc., in which he often relates anecdotes about his crazy 40-plus years in Twisted Sister as prime examples of what to do—and what not to do—in business. He also does business motivational speaking and keynote addresses. He usually asks his audiences how many have graduated college and how many have business degrees.

Then: "How many of you find it ironic that you take advice from a drug addict, misogynistic, wife beating, former heavy metal rock 'n roll star and high school dropout?" he jokes. "And they all start laughing. I say, 'You guys missed a party, and I'm telling you about business.' It's ironic, but it's what makes it interesting and funny because I've been successful for 40 years. Nothing replaces that, and if you can articulate your experiences, then you have a narrative."

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Shout! Factory
10 Surprising Facts About Mr. Mom
Shout! Factory
Shout! Factory

John Hughes penned the script for 1983's Mr. Mom, a comedy about a family man named Jack Butler (Micheal Keaton) who loses his job. To ensure their three kids are taken care of, his wife, Caroline (Teri Garr), goes back to work—leaving Jack to fight off a vacuum cleaner and learn why it's never a good idea to feed chili to a baby.

In 1982, Keaton turned in a star-making role in Ron Howard’s Night Shift, but Mr. Mom marked the first time he headlined a movie, and it launched his career. Hughes had written National Lampoon's Vacation, which—oddly enough—was released in theaters the weekend after Mr. Mom. But Hughes himself was still a relative unknown, as it would be another year before he entered the teen flick phase of his career, which would make him iconic.

In the meantime, Mr. Mom hit home for a lot of viewers, as the economy was on the downturn and more and more women were entering (or reentering) the workforce. But some people think that the movie's ending—which sees the couple revert to traditional gender roles—sidelined the movie's message. Still, on the 35th anniversary of its release, Mr. Mom remains an ahead-of-its-time comedy classic.

1. IT'S BASED ON A TRUE STORY.

Mr. Mom producer Lauren Shuler Donner came across a funny article John Hughes had written for National Lampoon. Based on that, she contacted him and the two became friends. “One day, he was telling me that his wife had gone down to Arizona and he was in charge of the two boys and he didn’t know what he was doing,” Donner told IGN. “It was hilarious! I was on the floor laughing. He said, ‘Do you think this would make a good movie?’ And I said, ‘Yeah, this is really funny.’ So he said, ‘Well, I have about 80 pages in a drawer. Would you look at it?’ So I looked at it and I said, ‘This is great! Let’s do it!’ We kind of developed it ourselves.” In the book Movie Moguls Speak, Donner mentioned how Hughes “had never been to a grocery store, he had never operated a vacuum cleaner. John was so ignorant, that in his ignorance, he was hilarious.”

The players involved with the movie told Donner and Hughes they thought it should be a TV movie. Hughes had a TV deal with Aaron Spelling, who came aboard to executive produce. “Then the players involved were upset because John was writing out of Chicago instead of L.A.,” Donner said in Movie Moguls Speak. “They fired John and brought in a group of TV writers. In the end, John and I were muscled out. It was a good movie, but if you ever read John’s original script for Mr. Mom, it’s far better.”

2. JOHN HUGHES REJECTED THE IDEA OF DIRECTING MR. MOM.

Stan Dragoti ended up directing the film, but only after Hughes turned it down, because he preferred to make his movies in Chicago, not Hollywood. “I don’t like being around the people in the movie business,” Hughes told Roger Ebert. “In Hollywood, you spend all of your time having lunch and making deals. Everybody is trying to shoot you down. I like to get my actors out here where we can make our movies in privacy.” Hughes remained in Chicago and filmed his directorial debut, Sixteen Candles, there.

3. MICHAEL KEATON GOT THE ROLE BECAUSE OF NIGHT SHIFT.

In 1982’s Night Shift, Keaton’s character works at a morgue and starts a prostitution ring with co-worker Henry Winkler. Donner had an agent friend, Laurie Perlman, who represented the not-yet-famous actor. She contacted Donner and pitched Keaton to her. “’Look, I represent this guy who is really funny. Would you meet with him?’" Donner recalled of the conversation. "So I met with him. Usually I don’t like to do this unless we’re casting, but I met with him because she was my friend. And then she said, ‘You have to see this movie Night Shift that he’s in.’ So I went to see Night Shift, and midway through I couldn’t wait to get out of that theater to give Mr. Mom to Michael Keaton. Fortunately, he liked it."

Keaton told Grantland that he turned down one of the main roles in Splash to play Jack Butler. “I just remember at the time thinking I wanted to get away from what I’d just done on Night Shift,” he said. “I thought if I do it again, I might get myself stuck. So then Mr. Mom came along. So I said no [to Splash] so I could set up this framework right away where I could do different things.”

4. THE FILM BROKE NEW GROUND.

Teri Garr, Michael Keaton, Taliesin Jaffe, Frederick Koehler, and Martin Mull in Mr. Mom (1983)
Shout! Factory

In 1983, more women stayed at home than worked, so it was a novelty for a man to be a stay-at-home dad. Today, an estimated 1.4 million men are stay-at-home dads, and 7 million men are their children's primary caregiver. “Mr. Mom became part of the vernacular,” Donner told Newsweek. “Mr. Mom represented a segment of men who were at home dealing with the kids who, up until then, really hadn’t been heard from. That’s what really told me about the power of film, because it spoke for a lot of men. It also helped women, because I think that women sometimes, if you’re a housewife, you’re not really appreciated for what you do. This sort of made women feel better about what they did because they knew that men were understanding it.”

5. TODAY, “MR. MOM” IS CONSIDERED A PEJORATIVE TERM.

More than 30 years after the film’s release, stay-at-home dads feel the term “Mr. Mom” should die. The National At-Home Dad Network launched a campaign to terminate the phrase and instead have people refer to men as “Dad.” In 2014 Lake Superior State University voted to banish “Mr. Mom” from the lexicon.

“At least, the pop-culture image of the inept dad who wouldn’t know a diaper genie from a garbage disposal has begun to fade,” wrote The Wall Street Journal, after declaring “Mr. Mom is dead.”

6. TERI GARR DIDN’T KNOW IT WAS A MESSAGE MOVIE.

The movie redefined gender roles, but when the producers pitched the premise to Garr, they hid the plot reversal. “They just told me it was about a guy who does the work that a woman does, because it’s so easy,” she told The A.V. Club. “And I went, ‘Oh, yeah. Ha ha.’ It’s so easy. All the women I know who stay home and take care of their kids, they go, ‘Oh yeah, this is easy.’ Hmm.”

7. MARTIN MULL IMPROVISED THE “220, 221” LINE.

The quote everyone remembers from the movie comes from Jack, holding a chainsaw, standing next to Ron Richardson (Martin Mull) and discussing what kind of wiring Jack will use in renovating the house: “220, 221, whatever it takes,” Jack says.

“We’re doing the scene and it was okay,” Keaton told Esquire. “And I remember saying to the prop guy, ‘Go find me a chainsaw.’ When he comes back with it, he says, ‘You wanna wear these?’ And he holds up some goggles. I go, ‘Yeah.’ You know, they make me look crazy. And when Martin shows up, I know I should look under control, I’m not sweating it. I’m a dude. So we’re standing there, Martin pulls me aside and says, ‘You know what you ought to say? When I ask about the wiring, you oughta just deadpan: ‘220, 221.’ I died. It was perfect. I may have added ‘whatever it takes.’ But it was his.”

“That was a little ad-lib that we just threw in, but every carpenter or construction person I’ve ever worked with, they’re always quoting that line from Mr. Mom,” Mull told The A.V. Club.

8. MR. MOM OUTGROSSED HUGHES’S OTHER 1983 SUMMER MOVIE—VACATION.

Mr. Mom only opened on 126 screens on July 22, 1983, but managed to gross $947,197 during its opening weekend. Once the film went wide a month later to 1235 screens, it hit number one at the box office and spent five weeks at the top. By the end of its run, the film had grossed just shy of $65 million, making it the ninth highest-grossing film of 1983 (just between Staying Alive and Risky Business). National Lampoon’s Vacation, Hughes’s other film that summer, came out July 29 and ended its theatrical run with $61,399,552 (at its height, it showed on 1248 screens). Vacation finished the year in 11th place.

9. THE MOVIE LED TO HUGHES BEING CALLED “A PURVEYOR OF HORNY SEX COMEDIES.”

During a 1986 interview with Seventeen magazine, Molly Ringwald asked the writer-director why he never showed teen sex in Sixteen Candles or The Breakfast Club. “In Sixteen Candles, I figured it would only be gratuitous to show Samantha and Jake in anything more than a kiss,” he said. “The kiss is the most beautiful moment. I was really amused when someone once called me a ‘purveyor of horny sex comedies.’ He listed The Breakfast Club and Mr. Mom in parentheses. I thought, ‘What kind of sex?’ Yes, in Mr. Mom there’s a baby in a bathtub and you see its bare butt.”

10. MR. MOM WAS MADE INTO A TV MOVIE AFTER ALL.

In the beginning, producers wanted Mr. Mom to be a TV movie, not a feature film. But a year after the film came out in theaters, ABC produced a TV movie called Mr. Mom, with the same characters and premise. Barry Van Dyke played Jack and Rebecca York played Caroline. A People magazine review of the movie stated: “They and their three kids are immediately likable … But it goes downhill from there as the script lobotomizes all its characters. Here’s a textbook case in how TV takes a cute idea—and a script that does have some good lines—and leeches the wit out of it.”

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Central Press/Getty Images
Ernest Hemingway’s Guide to Life, In 20 Quotes
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Central Press/Getty Images

Though he made his living as a writer, Ernest Hemingway was just as famous for his lust for adventure. Whether he was running with the bulls in Pamplona, fishing for marlin in Bimini, throwing back rum cocktails in Havana, or hanging out with his six-toed cats in Key West, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author never did anything halfway. And he used his adventures as fodder for the unparalleled collection of novels, short stories, and nonfiction books he left behind, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Death in the Afternoon, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea among them.

On what would be his 119th birthday—he was born in Oak Park, Illinois on July 21, 1899—here are 20 memorable quotes that offer a keen perspective into Hemingway’s way of life.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

ON TRUST

"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."

ON DECIDING WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT

"I never had to choose a subject—my subject rather chose me."

ON TRAVEL

"Never go on trips with anyone you do not love."


Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. [1], Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS

"Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

ON TRUTH

"There's no one thing that is true. They're all true."

ON THE DOWNSIDE OF PEOPLE

"The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness, except for the very few that were as good as spring itself."

ON SUFFERING FOR YOUR ART

"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."

ON TAKING ACTION

"Never mistake motion for action."

ON GETTING WORDS OUT

"I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast—talk them or write them down."


Photograph by Mary Hemingway, in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE BENEFITS OF SLEEP

"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?"

ON FINDING STRENGTH 

"The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places."

ON THE TRUE NATURE OF WICKEDNESS

"All things truly wicked start from innocence."

ON WRITING WHAT YOU KNOW

"If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one ninth of it being above water."

ON THE DEFINITION OF COURAGE

"Courage is grace under pressure."

ON THE PAINFULNESS OF BEING FUNNY

"A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book."


By Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. - JFK Library, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON KEEPING PROMISES

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

ON GOOD VS. EVIL

"About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after."

ON REACHING FOR THE UNATTAINABLE

"For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

ON HAPPY ENDINGS

"There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it."

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