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Good Morning America Visits Star Trek: TNG in 1992

YouTube // TrekCore
YouTube // TrekCore

In February 1992, Good Morning America anchors Charles Gibson and Joan Lunden visited the Star Trek: TNG set and delivered their morning broadcast there. It was deeply awkward. "We're on the bridge, which is really neat. There's neat stuff around here, on the Enterprise!" -Joan Lunden

At first the duo wandered around the sets, delivering their typical introductions to down-to-earth segments from the TNG shooting locations. (They were in the middle of an election primary season—sound familiar?) Eventually the anchors sat down with the cast for awkward interviews.

The broadcast closed with the anchors beaming down from the Enterprise, just after promoting the next day's interviews with the Democratic presidential primary candidates (!). A fan has cobbled together all the TNG-related bits in one 30-minute video here:

Trivia: This was shot during the filming of the episode Cost of Living, the 20th episode of the fifth season. (It's the one where Lwaxana Troi hangs out with Worf's son Alexander.) Can you spot the very significant cast member who is conspicuously absent from this awkward morning show? He made it so.

See also: Dr. McCoy Visits the Set of Star Trek: TNG.

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The One Word You Can't Say on Star Trek
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CBS

When it premiered in 1966, Star Trek presented a world unlike anything else on television at the time. But there was one frontier even its creator wouldn’t venture into: As Entertainment Weekly reports, the word "God" must never be mentioned on the show.

The rule originated with Star Trek’s creator, Gene Roddenberry, and will be followed by the makers of the franchise’s newest property, Star Trek: Discovery, which premieres in September. According to the writer Kirsten Beyer, the new series adheres to Roddenberry’s idea of "a science-driven 23rd-century future where religion basically no longer exists." That doesn’t just mean that religion shouldn’t interfere with the plot; even a casual "for God’s sake" ad libbed by an actor won't make it into a final cut.

Roddenberry was known for creating several cardinal rules for the Star Trek universe. Besides forbidding any mention of religion, he also maintained that crews should be diverse, characters should avoid meddling with other cultures, and there should be no serious interpersonal conflicts aboard the vessel (you can read more about his vision in the Star Trek: The Next Generation show bible [PDF]). But even the showrunners of Star Trek: Discovery don’t promise to stay 100 percent faithful to Roddenberry’s wishes. They’ve already stated that they’re abandoning his rule about conflict in favor of more realistic drama. So if their position on the God rule changes, it won’t be unprecedented.

[h/t Entertainment Weekly]

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Star Trek Fan Builds Klingon Warship Entirely From LEGO Bricks
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iStock

Proving that nerdy interests don’t need to be mutually exclusive, io9 reports that a German man named Kevin J. Walter has built a miniature version of the Klingon Bird-of-Prey ship from the Star Trek saga, entirely from LEGO bricks.

Walter told io9 that the project is his way of paying tribute to the TV show’s recent 50th anniversary. From conception to finished product, the model took him around eight years to complete, including a year and a half or so to construct the final version.

The space ship's model is based on a virtual design, which the LEGO hobbyist tweaked from 2008 and 2010. As for its individual sections, the ship is built from a variety of LEGO parts that Walter ordered from BrickLink—some of which he repurposed in creative ways. (Example: Walter used Bilbo Baggins’s front door to make the ship’s guns.)

Initially, Walter wanted to make the wings moveable, but they proved to be too heavy and frail during the later stages of construction, CBR.com reports. Walter’s mock-up also called for more than 250,000 plastic bricks, but he ended up only using around 25,000. In its final state (including the stand), the ship is a little over two feet long, and ranges in width from 16 inches to nearly three feet.

Check out a photo below, or visit Walter’s Flickr page to view more images. And keep your eyes peeled for yet another LEGO project, courtesy of Walter: a 150,000-piece LEGO model of Barad-dûr, or “The Dark Tower,” from The Lord of the Rings franchise. It’s been in the works for more than six years, and Walter hopes to complete it by the end of the year, just in time for The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers's 15th anniversary in December.

[h/t io9]

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