Original Nintendo Consoles Reborn as Custom Guitars

Since its discontinuation in North America in 1995, the Nintendo Entertainment System and its accessories have seen their share of alternative uses. Crafty Etsy user Doni Guitars came up with a more musical interpretation, turning the classic consoles into handmade electric guitars. Cleverly deemed the "NES Paul" (a reference to the inventor and namesake of the popular Les Paul guitar model), Doni Guitars' creation is playable and can be customized with the buyer's favorite game character on the headstock.

The UK-based builder also offers Star Wars-themed pieces shaped like the Millennium Falcon or the Y-Wing Starfighter vehicles. Curious about how they sound? A few YouTube videos, like the one below, feature musicians playing the Star Wars Rebel Bass and Solo guitars.

The NES Paul will set you back about $599, the Rebel Bass and Solo start at $749, or you can have DoniGuitars make you a one-of-a-kind piece for $899. 

[h/t Popular Mechanics]

Images via Etsy.

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Stradivarius Violins Get Their Distinctive Sound By Mimicking the Human Voice
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Italian violinist Francesco Geminiani once wrote that a violin's tone should "rival the most perfect human voice." Nearly three centuries later, scientists have confirmed that some of the world's oldest violins do in fact mimic aspects of the human singing voice, a finding which scientists believe proves "the characteristic brilliance of Stradivari violins."

Using speech analysis software, scientists in Taiwan compared the sound produced by 15 antique instruments with recordings of 16 male and female vocalists singing English vowel sounds, The Guardian reports. They discovered that violins made by Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari, the pioneers of the instrument, produce similar "formant features" as the singers. The resonance frequencies were similar between Amati violins and bass and baritone singers, while the higher-frequency tones produced by Stradivari instruments were comparable to tenors and contraltos.

Andrea Amati, born in 1505, was the first known violin maker. His design was improved over 100 years later by Antonio Stradivari, whose instruments now sell for several million dollars. "Some Stradivari violins clearly possess female singing qualities, which may contribute to their perceived sweetness and brilliance," Hwan-Ching Tai, an author of the study, told The Guardian.

Their findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. A 2013 study by Dr. Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus at Texas A&M University, also pointed to a link between the sounds produced by 250-year-old violins and those of a female soprano singer.

According to Vox, a blind test revealed that professional violinists couldn't reliably tell the difference between old violins like "Strads" and modern ones, with most even expressing a preference for the newer instruments. However, the value of these antique instruments can be chalked up to their rarity and history, and many violinists still swear by their exceptional quality.

[h/t The Guardian]

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This Beatles Poster Breaks Down the Instruments Played in Every Fab Four Song
Courtesy of Pop Chart Lab
Courtesy of Pop Chart Lab

If you're a Beatles fan who has memorized every second of every one of the legendary band's songs, from instruments to vocals, Pop Chart Lab has got a poster for you.

"Come Together," the pop culture-loving design company's latest poster, breaks down the instruments featured in every single one of The Beatles's songs, from 1963's "I Saw Her Standing There" to 1970's "Get Back." The chart is broken down into five colors—one for each member of the Fab Four, plus one hue to represent various non-band members—and the icons show you which instrument each member plays in each tune, from the conventional (guitar) to the unique (tape loops and mellotrons). Grab your headphones and follow along as you listen: soon you'll be able to impress your friends by rattling off who's singing when. Who knows—it might even inspire you to pick up the guitar and learn "Blackbird."

The poster measures 24 by 36 inches and pricing starts at $37. It's available for preorder now, and shipping begins April 20.

Music fans will also love Pop Chart Lab's other music posters, like this spread of famous guitars or this brilliant taxonomy of rap names.

Check out the art below. To purchase the poster and also enjoy Pop Chart Lab's many Beatles puns, click here.

Beatles Instrument poster
Pop Chart Lab

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