AMC Theaters Might Soon Let Millennials Use Their Phones During Movies


What’s worse than sitting next to someone using a phone during a movie? If you're a millennial, it's having to wait until the film is over to pull out your device—at least that’s the opinion of Adam Aron, the new CEO of AMC Entertainment.

According to Variety, Aron—who will soon become head of the world’s largest movie theater operator when AMC’s proposed merger with Carmike goes through—says he has considered letting theatergoers use their mobile devices during film screenings. That way, young people with smartphones will want to attend more movies.

“When you tell a 22-year-old to turn off the phone, don’t ruin the movie, they hear please cut off your left arm above the elbow,” Aron told Variety. “You can’t tell a 22-year-old to turn off their cellphone. That’s now how they live their life.”

Don’t worry, your local AMC auditorium won’t be transforming into a lawless land of glowing lights and bleeping electronics anytime soon. Aron acknowledges that his company needs to figure out a way to allow texting that doesn’t disrupt audiences.

While certain “texting-friendly” theater sections haven’t been entirely ruled out, a sea of bright screens would undoubtedly distract audience members. “What may be more likely is we take specific auditoriums and make them more texting-friendly," Aron says.

Some film lovers are outraged by this plan. Backlash against Aron’s millennial-targeted scheme prompted the CEO to tweet that he knows the vast majority of his audience “wants no texting.” If AMC did ever allow phones, they would only do so if they were "TOTALLY confident ALL our guests will fully enjoy movie going experience at AMC," he added.

As Deadline pointed out, this isn’t the first time theater executives have toyed with the idea of making movie theaters phone-friendly. In 2012, Greg Foster, senior executive vice president of IMAX Corporation, made a similar pro-phone argument while speaking on a panel at the annual CinemaCon convention.

"We want [millennials] to pay $12 to $14 to come into an auditorium and watch a movie,” Foster said. “But they’ve become accustomed to controlling their own existence.” The banning of cell phones might cause young movie-goers to “feel a little handcuffed,” he said. 

[h/t Variety]

5 Film Transitions Worth Knowing

You see them every day, on TV shows, the news, and in movies, but how well do you know the most oft-used film transitions? Here are the big five:


The dissolve is an editing technique where one clip seems to fade—or dissolve—into the next. As the first clip is fading out, getting lighter and lighter, the second clip starts fading in, becoming more and more prominent. The process usually happens so subtly and so quickly, the viewer isn't even aware of the transition. The above video offers a great overview of the cut, with examples.


This transition is the opposite of the dissolve in that it draws attention to itself. The best example of the wipe is what's known as the Iris Wipe, which you usually find in silent films, like Buster Keaton's or the Merrie Melodies cartoons—the circle getting smaller and smaller. Other wipe shapes include stars, diamonds, and the old turning clock.

The Star Wars films are chock-full of attention-grabbing wipes. Here are two good examples from The Empire Strikes Back. The first shows the clock wipe; the second, the diagonal wipe (pay no attention to the broken blocks at the start of the second clip—that's a technical glitch, not part of the film).


As the name implies, in the basic cutaway, the filmmaker is moving from the action to something else, and then coming back to the action. Cutaways are used to edit out boring shots (like people driving to their destination—why not see what the character is seeing or even thinking sometimes?) or add action to a sequence by changing the pace of the footage. My favorite use of the cutaway is in Family Guy, where the technique is used to insert throwaway gags. Here's a great example:


The L Cut, also called a split edit, is a very cool technique whose name dates back to the old analog film days.

The audio track on a strip of celluloid film runs along the side, near the sprocket holes. In the L Cut transition, the editor traditionally cut the picture frames out of the strip, but left the narrow audio track intact, thus creating an L-shape out of the film. A different camera angle, or scene was then spliced into the spot where the old picture was, so the audio from the old footage was now cut over the new footage.

Of course, with digital editing, one doesn't need to physically cut anything anymore, but the transition is still widely used, and the name has remained the same.

Split edits like these are especially effective in portraying conversations. Imagine how a simple conversation between two people might look if all we ever got was a ping-pong edit back and forth between the two people talking. The L cut allows the viewer to read the emotion on the listener's face, as the dialogue continues over, as we see in this clip from Ferris Bueller's Day Off:


The fade in and fade out usually signal the beginning or end of a scene, especially if the filmmaker is fading to/from black. This is the most common, of course, but fading to white has become trendy, too. The opening title sequence from the HBO series Six Feet Under featured many fades to black and a couple brief fades to white. The very last bit in the sequence fades slowly to white, and is my all-time favorite example of the transition:

science fiction
Why So Many Aliens in Pop Culture Look Familiar

Aliens have been depicted countless times in cinema, from Georges Méliès's A Trip to the Moon (1902) to James Cameron's Avatar (2009). But despite the advancements in special-effects technology over the past century, most aliens we see on screen still share a lot of similarities—mainly, they look, move, and interact with the world like humans do. Vox explains how the classic alien look came to be in their new video below.

When you picture an alien, you may imagine a being with reptilian skin or big, black eyes, but the basic components of a human body—two arms, two legs, and a head with a face—are likely all there. In reality, finding an intelligent creature that evolved all those same features on a planet millions of light-years away would be an extraordinary coincidence. If alien life does exist, it may not look like anything we've ever seen on Earth.

But when it comes to science fiction, accuracy isn't always the goal. Creating an alien character humans can relate to may take priority. Or, the alien's design may need to work as a suit that can be worn by human performers. The result is a version of extraterrestrial life that looks alien— but not too alien—to movie audiences.

So if aliens probably won't have four limbs, two eyes, and a mouth, what would they look like if we ever met them person? These experts have some theories.

[h/t Vox]


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