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22 of the World’s Craziest Jelly Bean Flavors

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iStock

Step into any candy store and you can find your normal cherry, cinnamon, and licorice jelly beans… but those willing to do a little digging will be rewarded with flavors more off the beaten path. From alcohol-inspired beans to things you’d never, ever want to taste in a non-bean form (baby wipes, anyone?), here are 22 of the weirdest jelly bean flavors out there.

1. DRAFT BEER

These alcohol-free jelly beans from Jelly Belly also come packaged in miniature beer bottles and cans.

Find it: Amazon

2. CHAMPAGNE

For the more sophisticated among you, Jelly Belly also sells champagne-flavored jelly beans.

Find it: Amazon

3. TABASCO

For those who want at least a little sweetness when they’re eating candy, Jelly Belly’s Tabasco-flavored jelly beans also come covered in dark chocolate.

Find it: Amazon

4., 5., AND 6. BARF, BOOGERS, AND BABY WIPES

Any list of weird jelly bean flavors would be incomplete without Jelly Belly’s BeanBoozled line, which cunningly mixes “weird and wild” flavors with normal flavors that look almost exactly like them. Will you get barf, boogers, and baby wipes or peach, juicy pear, and coconut? Do you want to risk it?

Find it: Amazon

7., 8., AND 9. EARTHWORM, EAR WAX, AND VOMIT

Jelly Belly also mixes yum with yuck with their Harry Potter tie-in Bertie Bott’s Every Flavour Beans, though they do their customers a solid this time by not making the nasty and normal flavors look the same.

Find it: Amazon

10. PANCAKES AND MAPLE SYRUP

Who says you can’t eat candy for breakfast?

Find it: Amazon

11. HABANERO PEPPER

These “kick yo’ ass hot” jelly beans “taste just like a normal jelly bean when you start out and then WHAM!”

Find it: Amazon

12. EGG NOG

Jelly Belly’s “Holiday Favorites” pack features, among more normal flavors, egg nog jelly beans. Anyone who wants to buy Christmas spirit in bulk can get 10 pounds of the suckers for a cool 70 bucks.

Find it: Amazon 

13. MARGARITA

Jelly Belly has a whole series of Cocktail Classics, which includes margarita, mojito, peach bellini, piña colada, pomegranate cosmo, and strawberry daiquiri-flavored beans.

Find it: Amazon

14. CHILI MANGO

This chili mango concoction from Jelly Belly was inspired by Latin America street food and “is made with real cayenne pepper, paprika, and mango juice.”

Find it: Jelly Belly

15. LYCHEE

Jelly Belly’s lychee jelly beans can’t be found on JellyBelly.com; instead, you have to visit their international sites, like Australia or China, to see them.

Find it: Candy Hero

16. GREEN TEA

Green tea is another flavor listed only on non-U.S. Jelly Belly sites, like those for Germany and Greece.

Find it: Candy Hero

17. WASABI

Wasabi is one of the flavors in David’s Signature Beyond Gourmet jelly bean “Man Mix”; others include habanero, chipotle, sea salt, thai chili, and bacon. The official website lists packages of individual flavors as “coming soon.”

Find it: Amazon 

18. BARBECUE BANANA

Jelly Belly’s “Beanaturals” assortment includes some normal flavors, like cherry, fruit punch, lime … and also “barbecue banana.” These have been discontinued, so they’re tough to find, but you can still turn them up if you do some digging.

Find it: Candy Funhouse

19. BACON

There’s bacon-flavored everything else, so why would jelly beans be any exception?

Find it: Amazon 

20. TIRAMISU

Gourmet candy company Gimbal’s goes fancy with a tiramisu jelly bean, one of the 41 flavors found in their standard assortment.

Find it: Amazon

21. BUTTERED POPCORN

Buttered popcorn might seem like a weird flavor for a jelly bean, but it’s also a very popular one. It’s the second most popular flavor Jelly Belly sells, in fact, trailing number one seller Very Cherry by only eight million beans. 

Find it: Amazon

22. CHOCOLATE PUDDING

Jelly Belly sells chocolate pudding jelly beans for chocoholics on the go.

Find it: Jelly Belly

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An Eco-Friendly Startup Is Converting Banana Peels Into Fabric for Clothes
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iStock

A new startup has found a unique way to tackle pollution while simultaneously supporting sustainable fashion. Circular Systems, a “clean-tech new materials company,” is transforming banana byproducts, pineapple leaves, sugarcane bark, and flax and hemp stalk into natural fabrics, according to Fast Company.

These five crops alone meet more than twice the global demand for fibers, and the conversion process provides farmers with an additional revenue stream, according to the company’s website. Fashion brands like H&M and Levi’s are already in talks with Circular Systems to incorporate some of these sustainable fibers into their clothes.

Additionally, Circular Systems recycles used clothing to make new fibers, and another technology called Orbital spins those textile scraps and crop byproducts together to create a durable type of yarn.

People eat about 100 billion bananas per year globally, resulting in 270 million tons of discarded peels. (Americans alone consume 3.2 billion pounds of bananas annually.) Although peels are biodegradable, they emit methane—a greenhouse gas—during decomposition. Crop burning, on the other hand, is even worse because it causes significant air pollution.

As Fast Company points out, using leaves and bark to create clothing may seem pretty groundbreaking, but 97 percent of the fibers used in clothes in 1960 were natural. Today, that figure is only 35 percent.

However, Circular Systems has joined a growing number of fashion brands and textile companies that are seeking out sustainable alternatives. Gucci has started incorporating a biodegradable material into some of its sunglasses, Bolt Threads invented a material made from mushroom filaments, and pineapple “leather” has been around for a couple of years now.

[h/t Fast Company]

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Apeel
New Plant-Based Coating Can Keep Your Avocados Fresh for Twice as Long
Apeel
Apeel

Thanks to a food technology startup called Apeel Sciences, eating fresh avocados will soon be a lot easier. The Bill Gates–backed company has developed a coating designed to keep avocados fresh for up to twice as long as traditional fruit, Bloomberg reports, and these long-lasting avocados will soon be available at 100 grocery stores across the Midwestern U.S. Thirty or so of the grocery stores involved in the limited rollout of the Apeel avocado will be Costcos, so feel free to buy in bulk.

Getting an avocado to a U.S. grocery store is more complicated than it sounds; the majority of avocados sold in the U.S. come from California or Mexico, making it tricky to get fruit to the Midwest or New England at just the right moment in an avocado’s life cycle.

Apeel’s coating is made of plant material—lipids and glycerolipids derived from peels, seeds, and pulp—that acts as an extra layer of protective peel on the fruit, keeping water in and oxygen out, and thus reducing spoilage. (Oxidation is the reason that your sliced avocados and apples brown after they’ve been exposed to the air for a while.) The tasteless coating comes in a powder that fruit producers mix with water and then dip their fruit into.

A side-by-side comparison of a coated and uncoated avocado after 30 days, with the uncoated avocado looking spoiled and the coated one looking fresh
Apeel

According to Apeel, coating a piece of produce in this way can keep it fresh for two to three times longer than normal without any sort of refrigeration or preservatives. This not only allows consumers a few more days to make use of their produce before it goes bad, reducing food waste, but can allow producers to ship their goods to farther-away markets without refrigeration.

Avocados are the first of Apeel's fruits to make it to market, but there are plans to debut other Apeel-coated produce varieties in the future. The company has tested its technology on apples, artichokes, mangoes, and several other fruits and vegetables.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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