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You Can Now Hop a Private Jet For Just $109

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Private jets are pretty much the pinnacle of luxury (OK, aside from maybe yachts and everything on Cribs). Now, a public charter operator is making them accessible for all. That’s right, it’s time to live out those champagne dreams just like you always knew you were meant to.

California-based JetSuite is rolling out affordable jet travel for short, West Coast flights with fares starting at just $109 for a one-way trip (that will get you to Buchanan Field Airport, about 30 miles northeast of San Francisco, from Bob Hope Airport in Burbank). Tickets for JetSuiteX flights are on sale starting this week, and while they only offer a limited set of departures and destinations, more are set to be added in the coming year. The top-tier price for a one-way flight is about $300.

The flights offer business class-style seats and a 36-inch seat pitch (the distance between a point on one seat to the same point on the seat in front of or behind it). Other cushy perks include free Wi-Fi and streaming inflight entertainment, beamed right to your personal electronic device.

“It’s a private jet-style experience for the price of an airline seat,” JetSuite CEO Alex Wilcox told Condé Nast Traveler.

Perhaps best of all, JetSuite wants to help you avoid the worst thing about air travel: fellow travelers. By employing terminals usually reserved for private air travel, you can avoid the crowds and even the TSA, through there are still security screenings. To further feed the thrifter in you, the flights will even get you points on JetBlue.

Before you get too invested in actualizing that long-held fantasy of flying like a celebrity, know that these jets don’t fall under the literal definition of "private." JetSuite is in the process of acquiring 10 Embraer E135 regional jets, which are designed to hold 30 seats.

With the service, JetSuite hopes to exploit a potential market interested in smaller airports and shorter flights. While the company hopes to appeal largely to business travelers, affordable fares and the ability to check-in 15 minutes before take take-off are the kind of features everyone will like.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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History
When Chuck Yeager Tweeted Details About His Historic, Sound Barrier-Breaking Flight

Seventy years ago today—on October 14, 1947—Charles Elwood Yeager became the first person to travel faster than the speed of sound. The Air Force pilot broke the sound barrier in an experimental X-1 rocket plane (nicknamed “Glamorous Glennis”) over a California dry lake at an altitude of 25,000 feet.

In 2015, the nonagenarian posted a few details on Twitter surrounding the anniversary of the achievement, giving amazing insight into the history-making flight.

For even more on the historic ride, check out the video below.

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History
How the Wright Brothers' Plane Compares to the World's Largest Aircraft
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The Wright brothers famously built the world’s first powered, heavier-than-air, controllable aircraft. But while the siblings revolutionized the field of aviation, their early plane looks tiny—and dare we say quaint-looking—when compared to the aerial giants that came after it.

In Tech Insider’s video below, you can see how the Wright brothers’ flyer stacks up against the scale of other aircrafts. You'll notice that size doesn't always guarantee a successful journey. The Hughes H-4 Hercules—the largest flying boat ever made—never made it past the prototype stage, performing only one brief flight in 1947. And the Hindenburg, which was 804 feet long and could fit 80 Olympic swimming pools, famously exploded on May 6, 1937.

Today’s longest commercial airliner is the Boeing 747-8, which measures 251 feet from nose to tail. While slightly shorter (238 feet), the Airbus A380 is certified to hold more people than any other plane in the air—a total of 850 passengers. That record won't last long, though: In a few years, the Stratolaunch carrier—the widest aircraft ever built—will dwarf its contemporaries when it takes to the skies in 2019. Built to launch rockets into orbit, its wingspan is about the size of a football field, even bigger than that of the Hughes H-4 Hercules.

Still, what the Wright brothers’ plane lacked in size, it made up for in ingenuity. Without it, these other giants may never have existed.

[h/t: Tech Insider]

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