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Brian Stelfreeze/Marvel Comics
Brian Stelfreeze/Marvel Comics

The 3 Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Brian Stelfreeze/Marvel Comics
Brian Stelfreeze/Marvel Comics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. BLACK PANTHER #1

By Ta-Nehisi Coates, Brian Stelfreeze, and Laura Martin
Marvel Comics 


In the early 2000s, it seemed like comics were always chasing legitimacy by courting writers from the outside. Sure, some of these writers created some good comics, like Jonathan Lethem’s Omega the Unknown or Gerard Way’s Umbrella Academy, but there were just as many forgettable vanity projects and simple failures on the part of a prose writer or a filmmaker to grasp the visual language and pacing of comics. Today, as comics publishers seem to have relaxed about it, legitimacy has arrived on its own, as most people have come to appreciate the quality of today’s comics and the influence they have on our popular culture right now. This week sees one of the most significant and honored writers to enter this world from the outside, Ta-Nehisi Coates, give us his take on Black Panther, a character who is about to gain the biggest level of public awareness in his history.

Coates is the author of the National Book Award-winning Between The World And Me and is a national correspondent for The Atlantic who has won many awards for his 2014 cover story “The Case for Reparations.” He is considered one of the best writers on race, politics, and social issues in America and he’ll likely be bringing a lot of those issues into his work here. In addition to being a superhero, Black Panther is also King T’Challa, ruler of a technologically advanced but often-embattled fictional African country called Wakanda. Coates’s partner on the series, artist Brian Stelfreeze, approaches his depiction of Wakanda as a “melting pot” of different African cultures from the Zulu tribes to ancient Egypt.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Black Panther’s debut in Fantastic Four #52. It also marks his big screen debut in next month's Captain America: Civil War. Until now, T’Challa has more often than not been a guest star in other books or an occasional member of the Avengers. However, when he has had his own series, he has boasted some runs by writers like Don McGregor, Christopher Priest, and Reginald Hudlin that are still highly regarded by fans today. These are strong acts in the Black Panther library to follow, but Marvel couldn’t have picked a more interesting writer to capitalize on T’Challa’s big moment in the spotlight.

2. WONDER WOMAN: EARTH ONE VOL. 1. 

By Grant Morrison, Yanick Paquette, and Nathan Fairbairn 
DC Comics 


DC’s Earth One series of graphic novels introduce retooled, modernized versions of their most iconic characters, freed from the narrative confines of continuity. Considering DC already rebooted their whole line of comics a few years ago and we’re constantly seeing updated origins for big characters like Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, it can be hard to see what the purpose of the Earth One books actually is. What makes them stand out, besides their straight-to-hardcover format, is that they give mostly free rein and a clean continuity slate to a set of all-star creators. The long-awaited first volume of Wonder Woman: Earth One is written by super star Grant Morrison and drawn by popular DC artist and frequent Morrison collaborator Yanick Paquette. Any time Morrison, who wrote one of the definitive takes on Superman in All-Star Superman, gives us his take on a character, expect a modern sheen with layers of history underneath.

Wonder Woman’s cinematic debut in this month's Batman v Superman seems to be the most universally liked aspect of that film, making this a great time for a bookstore-ready Wonder Woman book to hit the shelves. Interestingly, it comes out around the same time as another retelling of Wonder Woman’s origins that may stand in stark contrast to this one. The recent comic series The Legend of Wonder Woman uses a decidedly young adult fantasy approach to tell Princess Diana’s early years, whereas Morrison and Paquette lean more adult than young adult. With nods to the character’s roots in both violent Greek mythology and her early kinky bondage comics by creator William Moulton Marston, there are some scenes here that have already given certain Wonder Woman fans pause. Paquette’s style of drawing statuesque pin-up girls make the first half of this book, set on the Amazonian island of Themyscira, seem like it is aimed solely at straight male readers. There are reasons for everything Morrison does, however, as he attempts to use elements of Marston's early, sexualized comics and Wonder Woman’s roots as an early feminist icon to try to get to a contemporary and perhaps nuanced view of Diana.

3. POE DAMERON #1

By Charles Soule and Phil Noto
Marvel Comics 


When original Star Wars fans like myself were anxiously waiting for the release of sequels like Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi, Marvel Comics helped fill in those long, three-year gaps with their (non-canon) monthly Star Wars comic. Nowadays, Marvel is once again producing Star Wars comics, and this time they are officially in canon (until someone at Disney or Lucasfilm decides they’re not). However, the way J.J. Abrams ended Episode VII doesn’t leave a lot of story gaps to fill, with main players Rey and Finn’s plot lines being tied up in cliffhangers. It’s hard to imagine Abrams and company wanting to reveal those characters’ next moves in a comic book rather than the next film.

With that in mind, Marvel’s first Force Awakens-related comic is Poe Dameron, an ongoing series that will be set before the events of the last film and will tell the adventures of the heroic Resistance pilot and his droid pal BB-8. As they have been doing with all their Star Wars books, Marvel has chosen big-name creators for this title. Writer Charles Soule has already had his hand in some other Star Wars comics like Lando and Obi-Wan and Anakin and artist Phil Noto is also already working on a Chewbacca solo series.

If you’re more of a BB-8 than a Poe fan, the little droid has a cute backup feature in this comic drawn by Chris Eliopoulos in his Calvin & Hobbes-inspired style.

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Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
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Deadpool Fans Have a Wild Theory About Who Cable Really Is
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation

Deadpool 2 is officially in theaters and ruling the box office just like its predecessor did back in 2015. But this installment is about more than just crude jokes and over-the-top action scenes; it also includes the debut of a longtime Marvel character that fans have been clamoring to see on the big screen since 2000’s X-Men hit theaters: Cable.

But the Cable in Deadpool 2 isn’t quite the one fans have gotten used to in the books—for starters, his powers and backstory are reined in considerably. While it’s easy to assume that’s by design, so that audiences can better relate to the character (which is played by Josh Brolin), some fans have speculated that the changes are because, well, this character isn’t really Cable at all; instead, Screen Rant has a theory that this version of the character is actually none other than an older Wolverine from the future.

So how can Wolverine be Cable? Well, it’s actually quite easy, considering that Wolverine was Cable in Marvel’s Ultimate Universe comics, which was a series of books in the 2000s that completely reimagined the regular Marvel Universe. In this reality, a grizzled, aged Wolverine takes on the Cable nickname and travels back in time to prevent a takeover of Earth from the villain Apocalypse.

We were already introduced to Apocalypse in 2016’s X-Men: Apocalypse, and while he was defeated in the end, Screen Rant theorizes that he could return like he does in the Ultimate X-Men comics: by inhabiting the body of Nathaniel Essex, a.k.a. Mister Sinister. Essex was already name-dropped in Apocalypse and Deadpool 2, so it stands to reason that there might be some larger story on the horizon for him.

This would, of course, lead to more X-Men movies down the road, with Cable revealing his true nature and teaming with a crew of mutants that includes the classic X-Men cast as well as their younger selves to battle a newly formed Apocalypse. It’d also allow the character of Wolverine to live on in Brolin, leaving Hugh Jackman to enjoy a retired life without claws.

Obviously this is just one fan theory based on a comic storyline from over a decade ago. It would also have to ignore a whole host of continuity problems—including the events of Logan. But having a twist with Cable actually being Wolverine from the future (and likely from a different reality) is the type of headache-inducing madness the comics are known for.

[h/t: Screen Rant]

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King Features Syndicate
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8 Things You Might Not Know About Hi and Lois
King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate

A comics page staple for nearly 65 years, Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois is a celebration of the mundane. Married couple Hiram “Hi” Flagston, wife Lois, and their four children balance work, school, and family dynamics, all of it with few punchlines but plenty of relatable situations. This four-panel ode to suburbia might appear simple, but it still has a rich history involving a beef with The Flintstones, broken noses, and one very important candy bar wrapper.

1. IT’S A SPINOFF OF BEETLE BAILEY.

Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker had been drawing that military-themed strip for four years when a friend of his named Lew Schwartz approached him in 1954 with a new idea: Why not create a strip about a nuclear family? Around the same time, the Korean War was ending, and Walker had sent Beetle home on furlough to visit his sister, Lois. Drawing a line between the two, Walker decided to pursue the suburbia idea using Lois as connective tissue. Hi and Lois was born: The two strips would see their respective characters visit one another over the years.

2. A CANDY BAR HELPED DEFINE THE STRIP’S LOOK.

Already working on Beetle Bailey, Walker decided to limit his work on Hi and Lois to writing. He wanted to collaborate with an artist, and so both he and his syndicate, King Features, went searching for a suitable partner. Walker soon came across ads for both Lipton’s tea and Mounds candy bars that had the same signature: Dik Browne. Coincidentally, a King Features executive named Sylvan Byck saw a strip in Boy’s Life magazine also signed by Browne. The two agreed he was a talent and invited Browne to work on the strip.

3. HI ORIGINALLY HAD A BROKEN NOSE.

As an artist, Walker had plenty of input into the style of Hi and Lois: Browne would later recall that trying to merge his own approach with Walker’s proved difficult. “When you draw a character like Hi, for instance, you immediately set the style for the whole strip,” he said. “You have already dictated what a tree will look like or how a dog will look, just by sketching that one head.” In his earliest incarnation, Hi had a broken, upturned nose to make him seem virile, puffed on a pipe, and wore a vest. Through trial and error, the two artists eventually settled on the softer lines the strip still uses today, an aesthetic some observers refer to as the “Connecticut school style” of cartooning.

4. EDITORS WERE WARY AT FIRST.

When Hi and Lois debuted on October 18, 1954, only 32 papers carried the strip. The reason, Walker later explained, had to do with concerns that he was spreading himself too thin. At the time, cartoonists rarely worked on two strips at once. Between Hi and Lois and Beetle Bailey, there was fear that the quality of one or both would suffer. Editors were also worried that having two artists on one project would dilute the self-expression of both. Walker stuck to his intentions—to make Hi and Lois a strip about the small pleasures of suburban life—and newspapers slowly came on board. By 1956, 131 papers were running the strip.

5. TRIXIE MAY HAVE SAVED THE STRIP.

With readers a little slow to respond to Hi and Lois, Walker had an idea: At the time, it was unusual for characters who don’t normally speak—like Snoopy—to express themselves with thought balloons. Walker decided to have baby Trixie think “out loud,” giving readers insight into her perspective. Shortly after Trixie began having a voice, Hi and Lois took off.

6. CHIP IS THE ONLY CHARACTER TO HAVE AGED.

Like most comic strip casts, the Hi and Lois family has found a way to stop the aging process. Baby Trixie is eternally in diapers; the parents seem to hover around 40 without any wrinkles. But oldest son Chip has been an exception. Roughly eight years old when the strip debuted, he’s currently 16, a nod to Walker's need for a character who can address teenage issues like driving, school, and dating.

7. IT LED TO HAGAR THE HORRIBLE.

Browne might be more well-known for his Hägar the Horrible, a strip about a beleaguered Viking. That strip, which debuted in 1973, was the result of Browne’s sons advising their father that Hi and Lois was really Walker’s brainchild and that Browne should consider a strip that could be a “family business.” By 1985, Hägar was in 1500 newspapers, while Hi and Lois was in 1000. Following Browne’s death in 1989, his son Chris continued the strip.

8. IT ALSO HAD A BONE TO PICK WITH THE FLINTSTONES.

The Flintstones, Hanna-Barbera’s modern stone-age family, premiered in primetime in 1960, but not exactly the way the animation studio had intended. Fred and Wilma were initially named Flagstone, not Flintstone, and the series was to be titled Rally ‘Round the Flagstones. But Walker told executives he felt the name was too close to the Flagstons of Hi and Lois fame. Sensing a possible legal issue, they agreed.

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