CLOSE
Amazon/YouTube
Amazon/YouTube

Amazon Now Offers More Than 100 Dash Buttons

Amazon/YouTube
Amazon/YouTube

Last year, Amazon introduced its Prime members to Dash Buttons—tiny, wireless buttons that make reordering the products you use every day (like, say, coffee) a snap. When you’re running low on a household essential, simply push the Dash Button and Amazon will send you more of that item with free, two-day delivery. Now the online retail giant has announced that they've expanded the program, tripling the number of available Dash Buttons with a host of new partners, including Charmin, Snuggle, Doritos, Playtex, Purina, Energizer, Red Bull, Brawny, Starbucks, Trojan, Vitamin Water, and—perhaps most importantly—Slim Jim.

Dash Buttons, which are only available to Amazon Prime members, retail for $4.99 each. However, the buttons come with a $4.99 coupon off your first order, so they’re essentially free. There are now 107 Amazon Dash Buttons for various household products. Get clicking!

[h/t USA Today]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
Live Smarter
Food Going Bad? How to Set the Correct Temperature For Your Fridge
iStock
iStock

Depending on the size of your household, your grocery bill can sometimes outpace utility costs or other expenses, making it one of the biggest monthly expenditures in your budget. If you've spent that money on organic, fresh produce, watching it go bad faster than it should can be a frustrating experience.

If your lettuce is getting icy or your meat is smelling a little fishy, the problem might be your refrigerator's temperature setting. While many newer fridge models have digital thermometers that make checking for the correct temperature easy—it should be right around 37°F, with your freezer at 0°F—others have a manual dial that offers ambiguous settings numbered from one to five or one to 10.

Fortunately, there's an easy way to make the knob match your ideal climate. Refrigerator thermometers are available at home goods stores or online and provide a digital readout of the refrigerator's interior that's usually accurate within 1°F. Leave the thermometer on the middle shelf to get the correct reading.

Once you have the appliance set, be sure to check it periodically to make sure it's maintaining that temperature. Packing too much food on your shelves, for example, tends to make the interior warmer. If the coils need to be cleaned, it might be retaining more heat. Kept at a steady 37°F, your food should remain fresh, safe, and perfectly cold.

 

[h/t Reader's Digest]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
science
New Clear Coating for Everyday Objects Repels Practically All Liquids
iStock
iStock

A new clear coating that is said to repel just about everything—peanut butter included—aims to halt the advance of sticky fingers. Developed by researchers at the University of Michigan, the substance can be applied to a variety of surfaces to keep them smudge- and crud-free, including smartphone and laptop screens, windows, walls, and countertops.

Researchers used algorithms to predict which substances would yield an efficient omniphobic coating, or in other words, something capable of repelling oils, alcohols, and other liquids while remaining durable and smooth. Made from a mix of fluorinated polyurethane and a fluid-repellent molecule called F-POSS, the coating can be “sprayed, brushed, dipped, or spin-coated onto a wide variety of surfaces, where it binds tightly,” according to the University of Michigan’s website.

The team’s findings were published in the March issue of the journal ACS Applied Materials Interfaces. Associate professor Anish Tuteja, who headed up the University of Michigan research team, says it could be a godsend for parents of young tots.

"I have a 2-year-old at home, so for me, this particular project was about more than just the science," Tuteja said in a statement. "We're excited about what this could do to make homes and daycares cleaner places, and we're looking at a variety of possible applications in industry as well."

The team is currently conducting follow-up tests to ensure the coating is nontoxic, but if all checks out, it could find its way into kindergarten classes and daycare centers within the next two years.

Child-proofing everyday objects for the sake of cleanliness isn’t its only potential application, though. The university notes that it could be beneficial to “all industries that depend on the condensation of liquids,” such as refrigeration, power generation, and oil refining.

In recent years, other researchers have set out to create omniphobic coatings, some of which have been successful. However, this undertaking is typically challenging and involves complex synthetic chemistry, according to Chemistry World.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios