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19 Offbeat Holidays You Can Celebrate in April

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Spring is in the air—and with these offbeat holidays, there's more than just the weather to celebrate. 

1. APRIL 1: NATIONAL FUN AT WORK DAY

Good luck with this one.

2. APRIL 2: INTERNATIONAL PILLOW FIGHT DAY

Have a pillow fight! But maybe don't wake someone up by holding a pillow over them like in the photo above ... though to be fair they seem to be having a fun time.

3. APRIL 2: NATIONAL FERRET DAY

We'll definitely be celebrating.

4. APRIL 2: NATIONAL LOVE YOUR PRODUCE MANAGER DAY

Or as Gilmore Girl fans everywhere refer to it, Sookie and Jackson Day. (OK, Jackson wasn't technically a produce manager, but let's give it up for all produce men and women everywhere.)

5. APRIL 5: NATIONAL DEEP DISH PIZZA DAY

A day to appreciate sky-high pies, or argue over the best pizza in all the land.

6. APRIL 6: SORRY CHARLIE DAY

Screenshot via YouTube

This holiday was inspired by Charlie the Tuna—the cartoon mascot for StarKist and the subject of an advertising campaign that ran until the 1980s. In the spots, Charlie purports to have good taste, and wants to be recruited by the company, but is perpetually rejected via a sign on a fish hook that reads, "Sorry, Charlie." (As the narrator explains, they're interested in tuna that tastes good, not tuna with good taste.) The ads spawned a national catchphrase, and this holiday seeks to recognize all those who have lived through rejection and still retain their spunk. 

7. APRIL 7: INTERNATIONAL BEAVER DAY

Ferrets aren't the only small mammals we love here at mental_floss: International Beaver Day will warrant its own party too

8. APRIL 7: NATIONAL BEER DAY

As if you needed a reason to celebrate.

9. APRIL 11: BARBERSHOP QUARTET DAY

Daniel Orthvia via Flickr // CC BY-ND 2.0

Consider a musical ode to these fearsome foursomes on their special day of the year. 

10. APRIL 11: INTERNATIONAL “LOUIE LOUIE” DAY


"Louie Louie" is, by some accounts, the most recorded rock song in history. (The most famous version was recorded by The Kingsmen in 1963.) This year, celebrate this offbeat holiday by finally figuring out the lyrics. 

11. APRIL 14: CELEBRATE TEEN LITERATURE DAY

We might have a favorite teen lit author, but on this holiday, there's no need to choose sides. Let's celebrate them all. 

12. APRIL 15: NATIONAL THAT SUCKS DAY

It's Tax Day and the anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, so yeah, kind of sucky.

13. APRIL 16: NATIONAL AUCTIONEERS DAY

We suggest that you celebrate your favorite auctioneer verbally, as long as you do so very quickly.

14. APRIL 18: NATIONAL STRESS AWARENESS DAY

Founded on the very cute notion that you are not aware of your stress.

15. APRIL 21: NATIONAL BULLDOGS ARE BEAUTIFUL DAY

If you didn't already know this, you can see yourself out. 

16. APRIL 21: NATIONAL HIGH FIVE DAY

Make 'em count today, and don't forget to keep an eye on the elbow.

17. APRIL 22: NATIONAL JELLY BEAN DAY

Unclear why this offbeat holiday doesn't fall closer to Easter, or on Ronald Reagan's birthday, but no matter. When you grab a handful to celebrate this year, just make sure you don't get "BeanBoozled."

18. APRIL 25: WORLD PENGUIN DAY

Seriously, all the animal holidays are good with us

19. APRIL 29: NATIONAL HAIRBALL AWARENESS DAY


Don't become a statistic. 

Holidays found in Chase's Calendar of Events 2016. All photos courtesy of iStock unless otherwise noted.

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10 Regional Twists on Trick-or-Treating
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iStock

Walk around any given American neighborhood on the night of October 31, and you’ll likely hear choruses of "trick-or-treat" chiming through the area. The sing-songy phrase is synonymous with Halloween in some parts of the world, but it's not the only way kids get sweets from their neighbors this time of year. From the Philippines to the American Midwest, here are some regional door-to-door traditions you may not have heard of.

1. PANGANGALULUWA // THE PHILIPPINES

Rice cakes wrapped in leaves.
Suman

The earliest form of trick-or-treating on Halloween can be traced back to Europe in the Middle Ages. Kids would don costumes and go door-to-door offering prayers for dead relatives in exchange for snacks called "soul cakes." When the cake was eaten, tradition held that a soul was ferried from purgatory into heaven. Souling has disappeared from Ireland and the UK, but a version of it lives on halfway across the world in the Philippines. During All Saints Day on November 1, Filipino children taking part in Pangangaluluwa will visit local houses and sing hymns for alms. The songs often relate to souls in purgatory, and carolers will play the part of the souls by asking for prayers. Kids are sometimes given rice cakes called suman, a callback to the soul cakes from centuries past.

2. PÃO-POR-DEUS // PORTUGAL

Raw dough.
iStock

Instead of trick-or-treating, kids in Portugal go door-to-door saying pão-por-deus ("bread for god") in exchange for goodies on All Saints Day. Some homeowners give out money or candy, while others offer actual baked goods.

3. HALLOWEEN APPLES // WESTERN CANADA

Kids trick-or-treating.
iStock

If they're not calling out "trick-or-treat" on their neighbors’ doorsteps on Halloween night, you may hear children in western Canada saying "Halloween apples!" The phrase is left over from a time when apples were a common Halloween treat and giving out loose items on the holiday wasn't considered taboo.

4. ST. MARTIN'S DAY // THE NETHERLANDS

The Dutch wait several days after Halloween to do their own take on trick-or-treating. On the night of November 11, St. Martin's Day, children in the Netherlands take to the streets with their homemade lanterns in hand. These lanterns were traditionally carved from beets or turnips, but today they’re most commonly made from paper. And the kids who partake don’t get away with shouting a few words at each home they visit—they’re expected to sing songs to receive their sugary rewards.

5. A PENNY FOR THE GUY // THE UK

Guy Fawkes Night celebration.

Peter Trimming, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 2.0

Guy Fawkes Night is seen by some as the English Protestants’ answer to the Catholic holidays associated with Halloween, so it makes sense that it has its own spin on trick-or-treating. November 5 marks the day of Guy Fawkes’s failed assassination attempt on King James as part of the Gunpowder Plot. To celebrate the occasion, children will tour the neighborhood asking for "a penny for the guy." Sometimes they’ll carry pictures of the would-be-assassin which are burned in the bonfires lit later at night.

6. TRICKS FOR TREATS // ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

Kids knocking on a door in costume.
iStock

If kids in the St. Louis area hope to go home with a full bag of candy on Halloween, they must be willing to tickle some funny bones. Saying "tricks-for-treats" followed by a joke replaces the classic trick-or-treat mantra in this Midwestern city. There’s no criteria for the quality or the subject of the joke, but spooky material (What’s a skeleton’s favorite instrument? The trombone!) earns brownie points.

7. ME DA PARA MI CALAVERITA // MEXICO

Sugar skulls with decoration.
iStock

While Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, is completely separate from Halloween, the two holidays share a few things in common. Mexicans celebrate the day by dressing up, eating sweet treats, and in some parts of the country, going house-to-house. Children knocking on doors will say "me da para mi calaverita" or "give me money for my little skull," a reference to the decorated sugar skulls sold in markets at this time of year.

8. HALLOWEEN! // QUEBEC, CANADA

Kids dressed up for Halloween.
iStock

Trick-or-treaters like to keep things simple in the Canadian province of Quebec. In place of the alliterative exclamation, they shout “Halloween!” at each home they visit. Adults local to the area might remember saying "la charité s’il-vous-plaît "(French for “charity, please”) when going door-to-door on Halloween, but this saying has largely fallen out of fashion.

9. SWEET OR SOUR // GERMANY

Little girl trick-or-treating.
iStock

Halloween is only just beginning to gain popularity in Germany. Where it is celebrated, the holiday looks a lot like it does in America, but Germans have managed to inject some local character into their version of trick-or-treat. In exchange for candy, kids sometimes sing out "süß oder saures"—or "sweet and sour" in English.

10. TRIQUI, TRIQUI HALLOWEEN // COLOMBIA

Kids dressed up for Halloween.
Rubí Flórez, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Kids in Colombia anticipate dressing up and prowling the streets on Halloween just as much as kids do in the States. There are a few significant variations on the annual tradition: Instead of visiting private residencies, they're more likely to ask for candy from store owners and the security guards of apartment buildings. And instead of saying trick-or-treat, they recite this Spanish rhyme:

Triqui triqui Halloween
Quiero dulces para mí
Si no hay dulces para mí
Se le crece la naríz

In short, it means that if the grownups don't give the kids the candy they're asking for, their noses will grow. Tricky, tricky indeed

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iStock
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10 Regional Twists on Trick-or-Treating
Original image
iStock

Walk around any given American neighborhood on the night of October 31, and you’ll likely hear choruses of "trick-or-treat" chiming through the area. The sing-songy phrase is synonymous with Halloween in some parts of the world, but it's not the only way kids get sweets from their neighbors this time of year. From the Philippines to the American Midwest, here are some regional door-to-door traditions you may not have heard of.

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