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Roadside Museum Houses the World's Smallest Versions of the World's Largest Things

4. World's Largest Collection of the World's Smallest Versions of the World's Largest Things Traveling Roadside Attraction and Museum

No cross-country road trip is complete without making a pit stop at the world's largest version of some random object. But if you don't have time to swing by the World's Largest Baked Potato in Idaho or the World's Largest Badger in Wisconsin, you can see them both at once at this Lucas, Kansas attraction, Atlas Obscura reports, albeit on a much smaller scale.

The World's Largest Collection of the World's Smallest Versions of the World's Largest Things is a museum dedicated to showcasing miniaturized replicas of America's kitschiest roadside landmarks. The smallest version of the World's Largest Ball of Gum made by chewing mini chicklets is on display, as is a recreation of the World's Largest Ball of Rubber Bands featuring tiny orthodontist's versions.

The attraction was born out of founder and curator Erika Nelson's passion for the gaudy behemoths that line our country's highways. She travels all over the U.S. looking for World's Largest Objects to document, and once she finds them, a pint-sized model is produced and added to the museum's collection. If she can, Nelson then returns to the original site to snap a meta-picture of the giant attractions with their mini doppelgängers. You can check out photos of the tiny replicas and their larger-than-life inspirations below.

World's Largest Ball of Gum with WSVoWL Ball of Gum, Lucas KS

big and little albert

World's Largest Badger, Birnamwood WI

lil badger

Randy's Donuts, Inglewood CA

World's Smallest Version of Randy's Donuts, Inglewood CA

Claude Bell's Dinosaurs, Cabazon CA

World's Smallest Version of the World's Largest Dinos, Cabazon CA

World's Smallest Version of the World's Largest Bottle of Catsup, Collinsville IL, with meta-photo

MetaPhoto:  WSVoWL Otter visits the WL Otter, Fergus Falls MN

MetaPhoto: World's Smallest Version of the World's Largest Talking Cow visits the World's Largest Talking Cow, Neillsville WI

World's Smallest Version of Carhenge visiting Carhenge, Alliance NE

World's Largest Artichoke, Castroville CA

World's Smallest Version of the World's Largest Artichoke, Castroville CA

Images courtesy of Erika Nelson via Flickr.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]

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The Indo-European language family includes most of the languages of Europe as well as many languages in Asia. There is a long research tradition that has shown, though careful historical comparison, that languages spanning a huge linguistic and geographical range, from French to Greek to Russian to Hindi to Persian, are all related to each other and sprung from a common source, Proto-Indo-European. One of the techniques for studying the relationship of the different languages to each other is to look at the similarities between individual words and work out the sound changes that led from one language to the next.

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