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This Video Gives You a Complete Tour of Paris in Just Two Minutes

If you’re dreaming of a trip to Paris but can’t quite make it there now, this video should tide you over. Filmmaker Tyler Fairbank of Light Owl Productions visited the City of Light for two weeks last year and took his camera nearly everywhere with him throughout his stay. The resulting short film, “Bonjour Paris,” may be one of the most artfully made tourist videos of all time.

Shooting most of his video with a handheld camera, with only the occasional use of a tripod, Fairbank got up close to iconic sights like the Mona Lisa, Arc de Triomphe, and Eiffel Tower. Editing his footage together into an incredibly fast-paced hyperlapse, Fairbank packs a lot of beautiful footage into just two minutes. Though much of the video feels like a walking tour of the city—albeit one that moves at a sprint instead of a stroll—some of Fairbank’s shots are truly transcendent: Eerie images of the city’s subterranean catacombs and shots that linger on details of art and architecture, accompanied by a beautifully constructed soundscape, capture the personality of Paris in a way that few tourist videos manage.

[h/t Gizmodo]

Banner Image Credit: Tyler Fairbank, Vimeo

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The Evolution of "Two" in the Indo-European Language Family
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The Indo-European language family includes most of the languages of Europe as well as many languages in Asia. There is a long research tradition that has shown, though careful historical comparison, that languages spanning a huge linguistic and geographical range, from French to Greek to Russian to Hindi to Persian, are all related to each other and sprung from a common source, Proto-Indo-European. One of the techniques for studying the relationship of the different languages to each other is to look at the similarities between individual words and work out the sound changes that led from one language to the next.

This diagram, submitted to Reddit by user IronChestplate1, shows the word for two in various Indo-European languages. (The “proto” versions, marked with an asterisk, are hypothesized forms, built by working backward from historical evidence.) The languages cluster around certain common features, but the words are all strikingly similar, especially when you consider the words for two in languages outside the Indo-European family: iki (Turkish), èjì (Yoruba), ni (Japanese), kaksi (Finnish), etc. There are many possible forms two could take, but in this particular group of languages it is extremely limited. What are the chances of that happening by accident? Once you see it laid out like this, it doesn’t take much to put *dwóh and *dwóh together.

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infographics
Beyond Plumbing: 19 Other Jobs on Mario's Resume
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Nintendo made news this week by subtly announcing that Mario is no longer a plumber. In fact, they're really downplaying his whole plumbing career. On the character's Japanese-language bio, the company says, "He also seems to have worked as a plumber a long time ago."

But Mario has always had plenty of jobs on the side. Here's a look at his resume:

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