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Patrizia via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Patrizia via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

6 Easter Customs From Around the World

Patrizia via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Patrizia via Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Easter is celebrated around the globe, but the customs can be very different depending on where you live. The feast dishes, the public celebrations, even the candy we consume often has a local flavor.

1. SWEDEN // EASTER WITCHES

Anneli Salo via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

Sweden has an Easter tradition with roots in pre-Christian Europe: On Maundy Thursday (Skärtorsdag), children go trick-or-treating. The Thursday before Easter was once said to be the day all witches flew on their broomsticks to a mountain to cavort with the devil. They flew back to their homes on Saturday, and tried to blend in with the rest of the churchgoers on Easter Sunday. In memory of this belief, children in Sweden and parts of Finland dress as witches (and sometimes other pop culture characters) and go from house to house seeking candy. Another related tradition is for people to build bonfires to ward off the returning witches flying overhead, as shown in the top image.    

2. AUSTRALIA // THE EASTER BILBY

Alpha via Flickr // CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Australians aren't big fans of rabbits. The furry creatures are an invasive species that has destroyed much of the native flora and supplanted the native fauna. So Australians have never been too keen on the idea of the Easter bunny bringing treats. In 1968, 9-year-old Rose-Marie Dusting of Queensland wrote a story called "Billy The Aussie Easter Bilby," which she later published. (A bilby is a native marsupial with long ears that made quite a good substitute for the Easter bunny.) In 1991, an official campaign was launched to promote the Easter bilby, and chocolatiers followed by fashioning candy bilbies for Easter baskets. The gift of a chocolate bilby is not only a holiday tradition now, but also a statement of Aussie pride.

3. ECUADOR // FANESCA, THE EASTER SOUP

Micah Yoder via Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Fanesca is a traditional Easter soup in Ecuador. It’s said to be made only once a year because the preparation is so time-consuming, and because each recipe makes such a large batch. The ingredients include a variety of fresh grains and beans, squash, salted cod, cheese, and milk. The twelve grains and beans are said to represent the twelve apostles, and the cod represents Jesus. A site called Laylita’s Recipes has the complete recipe and instructions for fanesca and other Ecuadorian Easter recipes.

4. NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR // SEAL FLIPPER PIE

Elijah van der Giessen via Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

The native people of eastern Canada have long hunted seals in the spring. When Europeans arrived, they found that all parts of the seal could be sold, except for the flippers, which were relatively tough. Those were kept for home consumption, and improved by coating in flour, frying with onions and other vegetables, and then being baked into a pie. Since it was made during the spring hunting season, Seal Flipper Pie became traditional for Lent and Easter in the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador. Today, it is served in restaurants and sold in groceries for the Easter season. 

5. HUNGARY // VÍZBEVETŐ

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An Easter tradition in Hungary involves throwing buckets of water on young women of marriageable age. Really. On the day after Easter, known as Easter Monday, the women dress up in traditional clothing, and young men douse them with water in a custom called “Water Sowing Monday,” or Vízbevető. This is supposed to be a pre-Christian cleansing ritual to promote fertility, which has evolved into a tradition that is sometimes an excuse for flirting with the opposite sex, and sometimes just a nuisance. See pictures of recent waterings here.

The custom isn’t limited to Hungary. In Poland, it’s known as Śmigus-Dyngus. There are variations in other Eastern European countries as well. In some places, you don’t need to dress up to get wet; in others, a little spritz of perfume replaces the drenching. Sometimes the dowsing is accompanied by poetry reading or symbolic “whipping” with pussy willows. Traditionally, the girls are supposed to return the favor on Tuesday, but in reality, all the shenanigans happen on the same day. 

6. ITALY // GIANT CHOCOLATE EGGS

blese via Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

In Italy, the tradition of celebrating Easter with eggs and candy has evolved into the custom of giving gifts tucked inside chocolate eggs. There are mass-produced chocolate eggs with treats inside for children, somewhat akin to Kinder Surprise eggs, except the Italian version for the holiday is much larger. There are also beautiful artisanal eggs made by chocolatiers, either wrapped in fancy paper and ribbons or decorated with intricate edible art right on the chocolate. The gifts inside are often customized—it’s not unusual to present an engagement ring or a set of car keys in this manner. More typical would be gold jewelry for one’s spouse, or a toy that one’s child has been craving. An internet search for “Italian chocolate Easter eggs” yields several chocolatiers who will ship the eggs to you. 

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10 Other Mother’s Days from Around the World
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After her mother passed away in 1905, Anna Jarvis resolved to dedicate a day to her mother, and mothers everywhere. Little did she know, and evidently much to her chagrin, Mother’s Day fast became a commercial phenomenon. Its popularity spread worldwide and many countries, particularly in the Western world, adopted the second Sunday in May as their official Mother’s Day. But not every nation followed suit—perhaps to the chagrin of their local flower companies. In fact, Mother’s Day in many countries has little or nothing to do with Anna Jarvis’s creation, nor does it always occur in May. These are just a few of those other Mother’s Days.

1. UK // MOTHERING SUNDAY, FOURTH SUNDAY OF LENT

The name may sound strikingly similar to its American counterpart, but the origins of Mothering Sunday are quite different. By most historical accounts, it was the Church of England that created Mothering Sunday to honor the mothers of England, and later to commemorate the “Mother Church” in all its spiritual nurturing glory. Hundreds of years ago, Christians were expected to make at least one return to their mother church each year. In other words, Mothering Sunday was the ultimate guilt trip to visit the woman or entity that gave them life. Was that so much to ask? The fourth Sunday of Lent became the designated day to make this journey, and remains the go-to holiday to celebrate Moms to this day.

2. THAILAND // MOTHER'S DAY, AUGUST 12

Her Majesty Sirikit the Queen of Thailand is also considered the mother of all her Thai subjects. In light of her royal maternal status, the Thai government made her birthday, August 12, Thailand’s official Mother’s Day in 1976. It remains a national holiday, celebrated countrywide with fireworks and candle-lighting. In related holidays, Father’s Day in Thailand falls on the current King’s birthday, December 5.

3. BOLIVIA // MOTHER'S DAY, MAY 27

During the struggle for independence from Spain in the early 19th century, many of the country's fathers, sons, and husbands were injured and killed on the battlefields. As the history is told to Bolivian students, one group of women from Cochabamba refused to stand idly by; on May 27, they banded together to fight the Spanish Army on Coronilla Hill. Though hundreds died in battle, the legacy of their contributions lives on thanks to a national law passed in the 1920s making the day on which the “Heroinas of Coronilla” took to the streets national Mother’s Day.

4. INDONESIA// MOTHER'S DAY OR WOMEN'S DAY, DECEMBER 22

Made official in 1953 by its president, Indonesia's Mother’s Day falls on the anniversary of the First Indonesian Women’s Congress (1928). The first convening of women in a governmental body is still considered pivotal in launching organized women’s movements throughout Indonesia. The holiday was created to celebrate the contributions of women to Indonesian society.

5. MIDDLE EAST (VARIOUS) // MOTHER'S DAY OR SPRING EQUINOX, MARCH 21

Egyptian journalist Mustafa Amin introduced the idea of a Mother’s Day to his home country, and it quickly spread throughout much of the region. Inspired by a story of a thankless widow ignored by an ungrateful son, Amin and his brother Ali successfully proposed a day in Egypt to honor all mothers. They decided the first day of spring, March 21, was most appropriate to celebrate the ultimate givers of life. It was first celebrated in Egypt in 1956, and is still observed throughout the region from Bahrain to the United Arab Emirates to Iraq.

6. NEPAL // MOTHER PILGRIMAGE FORTNIGHT OR MATA TIRTHA SNAN, LAST DAY OF THE MAISHAKH MONTH (USUALLY BETWEEN LATE APRIL AND EARLY MAY)

Stemming from an ancient Hindu tradition, this festival of honoring mothers is still commonly celebrated in Nepal. The holiday honors both the living and the dead equally. Traditionally, those honoring mothers who have passed away make a pilgrimage to the Mata Tirtha ponds near Kathmandu. A large carnival is also held in the Mata Tirtha village. Children show their mothers appreciation with sweets and gifts.

7. ISRAEL // FAMILY DAY OR THE HOLIDAY FORMERLY KNOWN AS MOTHER'S DAY, 30TH DAY OF SHEVAT (USUALLY FEBRUARY)

Henrietta Szold never had any children of her own, but that didn’t stop her from touching the lives of many young ones. Szold played an active role in the Youth Aliya organization, through which she helped protect many Jewish children from the horrors of the Holocaust. This earned her a reputation as the “mother” of all children. In the 1950s, an 11-year-old girl named Nechama Biedermann wrote to the children’s publication Haaretz Shelanu proposing they make the date of Szold’s death Israel’s national Mother’s Day. The newspaper readily agreed, as did the rest of the country. Despite the shift to a more gender-balanced Family Day, the holiday’s popularity has waned over the years.

8. ETHIOPIA // MOTHER'S DAY OR ANTROSHT, WHEN THE RAINY SEASON ENDS (OCTOBER/NOVEMBER)

Rather than tying themselves down to a specific date, Ethiopians wait out the wet season then trek home for a large, three-day family celebration. This feast is known as “Antrosht.” Unlike some western Mother’s Days, the mother plays a key role in preparing the traditional meals for the festival.

9. FRANCE // MOTHER'S DAY OR FÊTE DES MÈRES, LAST SUNDAY IN MAY

Celebrating a few Sundays later than the rest of the world feels so, well, French. However, according to one blogger, they may have beat all of us to the punch—sort of. France has a storied history of attempts to create a national Mother’s Day. Napoleon tried to mandate a national maternal holiday at the turn of the 19th century. But things ended up not working out so well for him and his holiday. More than a century later, Lyon held its own Mother’s Day celebration to honor women who lost sons to the First World War. It was not until May 24, 1950 that the Fête des Mères became an officially decreed holiday.

(The holiday is mandated to occur on the last Sunday in May. However, if that Sunday is also the Pentecost, then Mother’s Day is pushed to the first Sunday in June.)

10. NICARAGUA // MOTHER'S DAY OR DÍA DE MADRE, MAY 30

In the 1940s, President General Anastasio Somoza Garcia declared Mother’s Day in honor of the birthday of his mother-in-law. Despite its brown-nosing origins, it remains a big deal in Nicaragua.

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What's the Story Behind Cinco de Mayo?
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Cinco de Mayo, or May 5, is recognized around the country as a time to celebrate Mexico’s cultural heritage. Like a lot of days earmarked to commemorate a specific idea or event, its origins can be a little murky. Who started it, and why?

The holiday was originally set aside to commemorate Mexico’s victory over France at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. The two had gotten into a dispute after newly-elected Mexico president Benito Juárez tried to help ease the country’s financial woes by defaulting on European loans. Unmoved by their plight, France attempted to seize control of their land. The Napoleon III-led country sent 6000 troops to Puebla de Los Angeles, a small town en route to Mexico City, and anticipated an easy victory.

After an entire day of battle that saw 2000 Mexican soldiers take 500 enemy lives against only 100 casualties, France retreated. That May 5, Mexico had proven itself to be a formidable and durable opponent. (The victory would be short-lived, as the French would eventually conquer Mexico City. In 1866, Mexican and U.S. forces were able to drive them out.)

To celebrate, Juárez declared May 5, or Cinco de Mayo, to be a national holiday. Puebla began acknowledging the date, with recognition spreading throughout Mexico and in the Latino population of California, which celebrated victory over the same kind of oppressive regime facing minorities in Civil War-era America. In fact, University of California at Los Angeles professor David Hayes-Bautista cites his research into newspapers of the era as evidence that Cinco de Mayo really took off in the U.S. due to the parallels between the Confederacy and the monarchy Napoleon III had planned to install.

Cinco de Mayo gained greater visibility in the U.S. in the middle part of the 20th century thanks to the Good Neighbor Policy, a political movement promoted by Franklin Roosevelt beginning in 1933, which encouraged friendly relations between countries.  

There’s a difference between a day of remembrance and a corporate clothesline, however. Cinco de Mayo was co-opted for the latter beginning in the 1970s, when beer and liquor companies decided to promote consumption of their products while enjoying the party atmosphere of the date—hence the flowing margaritas. And while it may surprise some Americans, Cinco de Mayo isn’t quite as big a deal in Mexico as it can be in the States. While Mexican citizens recognize it, it’s not a federal holiday: Celebrants can still get to post offices and banks. 

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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