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Guido Crepax //Fantagraphics
Guido Crepax //Fantagraphics

The 4 Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Guido Crepax //Fantagraphics
Guido Crepax //Fantagraphics

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. THE COMPLETE CREPAX: DRACULA, FRANKENSTEIN, AND OTHER HORROR STORIES

By Guido Crepax
Fantagraphics

Guido Crepax // Fantagraphics

The late Guido Crepax was one of the most influential comics artist to work in erotic graphic literature. Crepax pulled elements of 1930s German Expressionist films, 1960s French New Wave, Art Nouveau design, BDSM, and the keen eye of figurative artists such as Egon Schiele. His kinky and surreal comics could be appreciated even more for their elaborate, psychedelic compositions and slightly exaggerated anatomy than for their eroticism. His influence is apparent in the work of contemporary cartoonists like Frank Miller, Paul Pope and Kevin O’Neill.

Most of the Italian artist’s work has been unavailable in the States, but U.S. publisher Fantagraphics has begun an ambitious endeavor to collect and translate his complete oeuvre over the course of 10 hardcover graphic novels. The first book hits stores this week, and rather than collect his work chronologically, the publisher has opted to release them by theme, with this first volume focusing on erotic horror. It begins with a number of Valentina stories from the 1960s that showcase Crepax at his best. Originally intended as a love interest for a super-powered hero named Neutron, Valentina quickly captured the attentions of both Crepax and his readers, even inspiring a 1973 Italian-French film. With a look drawn from silent film actress Louise Brooks and Jean-Luc Godard muse Anna Karina, Valentina is a strong, sexually liberated heroine.

This volume ends with two adaptations—one of Bram Stroker’s Dracula and the other of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein—produced later in Crepax’s career. While they lack many of the distinguishable stylistic characteristics that make his earlier work so recognizable, they still take the original material and add a number of erotic flourishes.

2. BATMAN #50

By Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo and Danny Miki
DC Comics

DC Comics

Typically, comics have always loved celebrating issue number milestones (#25, #50, #100), but these days, with most series relaunching every couple of years, longevity is no longer celebrated. DC helped start the relaunch trend in 2011 when they reset all their titles back to #1, but they’ve managed to stick to that sequencing for 50 issues. To mark that milestone, they are publishing some extra-sized issues this month. Of all the #50s, none will be as worthy of being treated as a milestone as Batman #50.

Batman has been, without a doubt, DC’s best title these past few years, and that is all because it has maintained a consistent creative team since issue one: Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo. They approach Batman with a post-Christopher Nolan edge and add some nice elements of comic book hyper-realism to the dark, grounded tone of the films. In their 50-issue run, they have retold Batman’s origin, physically deformed the Joker, introduced new mythologies to Gotham, and killed off both Batman and the Joker. That brings us to this issue where, of course, Batman returns from the dead. The beauty of this story is that Snyder and Capullo never tried to make us think that Bruce Wayne was actually dead; it’s been one of the best “Batman dies/someone else takes over” arcs ever.

This June, DC will be renumbering most books back to #1. However, for two of their oldest titles— Action Comics and Detective Comics—they will restore the legacy numbering in order to hit the mother of all milestones: issue #1000.

3. CANCER OWL

By Matthew Paul Mewhorter
cancerowl.com

Matthew Paul Mewhorter

Cartoonist Matthew Paul Mewhorter is a survivor of colorectal cancer (or as he calls it: “ass cancer”). When he was first diagnosed in 2014 at the age of 35, he began journaling about it using a little cartoon owl, called “Cancer Owl,” as a stand-in for himself. He created dozens of cartoons that, in a touching and effective way, poke fun at situations cancer patients can probably relate to: getting unsolicited treatment advice from strangers, trying to hold it together while talking with fellow patients, and of course dealing with the pain and suffering of chemotherapy. After Mewhorter beat his cancer, he was determined to continue the comic in hopes of using it as a form of therapy to help others.

Mewhorter posts new Cancer Owl comics every week and has just launched a Patreon campaign to raise money for supplies, advertising costs, and other projects. You can read all the Cancer Owl comics to date at CancerOwl.com and go to the Patreon page to support the campaign.

4. CARPET SWEEPER TALES

By Julie Doucet
Drawn & Quarterly

Julie Doucet // Drawn & Quarterly

Julie Doucet was one of Drawn & Quarterly’s early finds when the prestigious indie comic publisher first launched 25 years ago. Her Dirty Plotte anthology was picked up by D&Q in 1991 and made her an important name in late 20th century indie comics and a feminist icon. Doucet soon retired from making long-form comics and became a fixture in the Montreal arts community, but now she is back with a new graphic novel that is very different from her previous, hand-drawn autobiographical comics.

Carpet Sweeper Tales can best be described as an avante-garde remix of Italian fumetti (photo novels) from the 1970s. Cutting up those vintage magazines, she repurposes them into absurdist scenes of men and women speaking in stilted advertising slogans and typographical nonsense. It’s like revisiting how memes must have been made before there were ever GIFs and Tumblr.

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King Features Syndicate
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Comics
8 Things You Might Not Know About Hi and Lois
King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate

A comics page staple for nearly 65 years, Mort Walker and Dik Browne’s Hi and Lois is a celebration of the mundane. Married couple Hiram “Hi” Flagston, wife Lois, and their four children balance work, school, and family dynamics, all of it with few punchlines but plenty of relatable situations. This four-panel ode to suburbia might appear simple, but it still has a rich history involving a beef with The Flintstones, broken noses, and one very important candy bar wrapper.

1. IT’S A SPINOFF OF BEETLE BAILEY.

Beetle Bailey creator Mort Walker had been drawing that military-themed strip for four years when a friend of his named Lew Schwartz approached him in 1954 with a new idea: Why not create a strip about a nuclear family? Around the same time, the Korean War was ending, and Walker had sent Beetle home on furlough to visit his sister, Lois. Drawing a line between the two, Walker decided to pursue the suburbia idea using Lois as connective tissue. Hi and Lois was born: The two strips would see their respective characters visit one another over the years.

2. A CANDY BAR HELPED DEFINE THE STRIP’S LOOK.

Already working on Beetle Bailey, Walker decided to limit his work on Hi and Lois to writing. He wanted to collaborate with an artist, and so both he and his syndicate, King Features, went searching for a suitable partner. Walker soon came across ads for both Lipton’s tea and Mounds candy bars that had the same signature: Dik Browne. Coincidentally, a King Features executive named Sylvan Byck saw a strip in Boy’s Life magazine also signed by Browne. The two agreed he was a talent and invited Browne to work on the strip.

3. HI ORIGINALLY HAD A BROKEN NOSE.

As an artist, Walker had plenty of input into the style of Hi and Lois: Browne would later recall that trying to merge his own approach with Walker’s proved difficult. “When you draw a character like Hi, for instance, you immediately set the style for the whole strip,” he said. “You have already dictated what a tree will look like or how a dog will look, just by sketching that one head.” In his earliest incarnation, Hi had a broken, upturned nose to make him seem virile, puffed on a pipe, and wore a vest. Through trial and error, the two artists eventually settled on the softer lines the strip still uses today, an aesthetic some observers refer to as the “Connecticut school style” of cartooning.

4. EDITORS WERE WARY AT FIRST.

When Hi and Lois debuted on October 18, 1954, only 32 papers carried the strip. The reason, Walker later explained, had to do with concerns that he was spreading himself too thin. At the time, cartoonists rarely worked on two strips at once. Between Hi and Lois and Beetle Bailey, there was fear that the quality of one or both would suffer. Editors were also worried that having two artists on one project would dilute the self-expression of both. Walker stuck to his intentions—to make Hi and Lois a strip about the small pleasures of suburban life—and newspapers slowly came on board. By 1956, 131 papers were running the strip.

5. TRIXIE MAY HAVE SAVED THE STRIP.

With readers a little slow to respond to Hi and Lois, Walker had an idea: At the time, it was unusual for characters who don’t normally speak—like Snoopy—to express themselves with thought balloons. Walker decided to have baby Trixie think “out loud,” giving readers insight into her perspective. Shortly after Trixie began having a voice, Hi and Lois took off.

6. CHIP IS THE ONLY CHARACTER TO HAVE AGED.

Like most comic strip casts, the Hi and Lois family has found a way to stop the aging process. Baby Trixie is eternally in diapers; the parents seem to hover around 40 without any wrinkles. But oldest son Chip has been an exception. Roughly eight years old when the strip debuted, he’s currently 16, a nod to Walker's need for a character who can address teenage issues like driving, school, and dating.

7. IT LED TO HAGAR THE HORRIBLE.

Browne might be more well-known for his Hägar the Horrible, a strip about a beleaguered Viking. That strip, which debuted in 1973, was the result of Browne’s sons advising their father that Hi and Lois was really Walker’s brainchild and that Browne should consider a strip that could be a “family business.” By 1985, Hägar was in 1500 newspapers, while Hi and Lois was in 1000. Following Browne’s death in 1989, his son Chris continued the strip.

8. IT ALSO HAD A BONE TO PICK WITH THE FLINTSTONES.

The Flintstones, Hanna-Barbera’s modern stone-age family, premiered in primetime in 1960, but not exactly the way the animation studio had intended. Fred and Wilma were initially named Flagstone, not Flintstone, and the series was to be titled Rally ‘Round the Flagstones. But Walker told executives he felt the name was too close to the Flagstons of Hi and Lois fame. Sensing a possible legal issue, they agreed.

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Pop Chart Lab
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entertainment
A Visual History of Captain America’s Shields
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

Captain America has gone through plenty of wardrobe changes since his comic book debut in 1941, but it’s his iconic shield that has had the most makeovers. Over the past eight decades, fans have seen the shield change its shape, color, and even the material from which it’s crafted. For the folks at Pop Chart Lab, the shield’s storied history provided the perfect subject matter for their latest poster.

On this piece, the company teamed with Marvel to give a rundown of 50 of Cap’s shields—from the instantly recognizable to the downright obscure. Here we see his classic Golden Age shield, with its slightly different color scheme, and the different variations from Jack Kirby’s time-traveling Bicentennial Battles book. Then there are entries like the vibranium shield he received from Black Panther in Captain America #342 and an adamantium one made by Tony Stark.

Those different shields just scratch the surface of the deep cuts Pop Chart Lab provides. There are also shields from Captain Americas across Marvel’s numerous alternate universes, like the ones used by the Ultimate Universe Steve Rogers and the android Cap from Earth-725.

Each shield is illustrated to match its comic book counterpart and comes with a description specifying the series it debuted in and which Earth it exists on (the Marvel Universe has thousands of different versions of Earth, after all).

The posters will begin shipping on May 23, and you can pre-order yours now starting at $29 on the Pop Chart Lab website. You can check out a full look at the poster below.

Pop Chart Lab's Captain America shield poster
Pop Chart Lab

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