12 Weird Peeps Flavors to Try All Year Long

The start of spring signals the beginning of Peeps season. Celebrate the warmer weather with some of the festive candy brand’s wackier flavors.

1. Peeps Delights

Blueberry Delight Peeps
Peeps & Company

These special Peeps come in a variety of flavors including vanilla, orange sherbet, strawberry, coconut, and sugar cookie. They’re partially dipped in dark, milk, or white chocolate. Some also include fillings, like chocolate caramel swirl. You can pick up a pack on Amazon, buy them from the Peeps online store, or pick them up from Target.

2. Fruit Punch Peeps

Fruit Punch Peeps
Peeps & Company

If you’re ready for summer already, you can get a 10-pack of bright red, fruit punch-flavored Peeps. The flavor can be found on the Peeps store or on Amazon.

3. Pumpkin Spice Peeps

Pumpkin spice latte Peeps
Peeps & Company

Are you craving the flavor of a pumpkin spice latte off-season? These PSL Peeps first debuted in 2015, but sadly, they're now nearly impossible to find, even on Amazon. We're praying they'll come back someday, though.

4. Cotton Candy Peeps

Cotton Candy Peeps
Peeps & Company

Another relatively new flavor on the Peeps scene is the ambitious cotton candy. Perfect for carnival lovers with a sweet tooth, these light pink Peeps come with little flecks of blue sugar. You can pick up a pack from the Peeps store, on Amazon, or at Target.

5. Sour Watermelon Peeps

Sour Watermelon Peeps
Peeps & Company

Here is another tart flavor of Peep that is a little more controversial. Most people will either love or hate these boldly flavored birds. They have green sugar outsides and pink marshmallow insides to imitate a real watermelon. You can find them at Walmart, Target, Amazon, or the Peeps store.

6. Bubble Gum Peeps

Bubble Gum Peeps
Peeps & Company

If you hate that you can’t (or at least, shouldn’t) swallow bubble gum, then maybe these Peeps are for you. Get the light pink marshmallows at Walmart.

7. Party Cake Peeps

Party Cake Peeps
Peeps & Company

Got a party coming up? Pick up a 10-pack of these festive Peeps. They even come with colorful sprinkles for added fun. Get them at Target, the Peeps store, or on Amazon.

8. Red Velvet Peeps

Red Velvet Peeps
Peeps & Company

Red velvet isn’t just for cupcakes and waffles. The decadent flavor was part of a Christmas-themed series, which also included hot cocoa, candy cane, and sugar cookie. Since it’s past the season, you can’t get them in stores, but keep an eye out on Amazon in case the delicious flavor ever returns.

9. Pancakes and Syrup Peeps

Pancakes & Syrup Peeps
Peeps & Company

These Pancakes & Syrup Peeps are a perfect excuse to eat sweets for breakfast. You can snag some from the Peeps store or on Amazon.

10. Caramel Apple Peeps

Caramel Apple Peeps
Peeps & Company

If you’re not crazy about spring or winter flavors, Peeps has also created some autumn options. The caramel apple—apple flavored Peeps that are dipped in caramel fudge—came out in 2015, at the same time as the candy corn and pumpkin spice flavors. And like them, the limited-time flavor it was gone too soon. But if you really get a hankering for caramel apple Peeps, you can still snag a box on eBay … if you're willing to pay $334.

11. Sweet Lemonade Peeps

Sweet Lemonade Peeps
Peeps & Company

Another limited-time flavor we're hoping will return, Peeps released these summery lemonade-flavored marshmallows in 2013. Part of the proceeds for each package sold went to Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer.

12. Mystery Peeps

Mystery Peeps
Peeps & Company

Feeling indecisive? Let the Peep pick the flavor for you. Each Easter season, Peeps releases a selection of plain white chicks, challenging customers to guess the flavor. While we have yet to hear about the 2019 release, last year, there were three different boxes to choose from, all sold at Walmart. Fans were encouraged to try all three and then send guesses to @PeepsBrand on social media with the hashtag #mysterypeeps. Stay tuned over the next few weeks for the 2019 flavors, and if you missed out on previous mystery-flavor releases, you can still get some of those Peeps on Bonanza and eBay.

A version of this story first ran in 2016. It has been updated to reflect current availability.

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Cheese Made from Celebrities' Microbes Is On View at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum

iStock/bhofack2
iStock/bhofack2

London's Victoria & Albert Museum is home to such artifacts as ancient Chinese ceramics, notebooks belonging to Leonardo da Vinci, and Alexander McQueen's evening dresses—all objects you might expect to see in a world-famous museum. However, the cultural significance of the selection of cheeses now on display at the museum is less obvious. The edible items, part of a new exhibition called FOOD: Bigger than the Plate, were cultured from human bacteria swabbed from celebrities.

Though most diners may prefer not to think about it, bacteria is an essential ingredient in many popular foods. Beer, bread, chocolate, and cheese all depend on microbes for their signature flavors. Scientists took this ick factor one step further by sourcing bacteria from the human body to make cheese for the new exhibit.

Smell researcher Sissel Tolaas and biologist/artist Christina Agapakis first conceived their human bacteria cheese project, titled Selfmade, in 2013. When a chef and team of scientists recreated it for the Victoria & Albert Museum, they found famous figures to donate their germs. Blur bassist Alex James, chef Heston Blumenthal, rapper Professor Green, Madness frontman Suggs, and The Great British Baking Show contestant Ruby Tandoh all signed up for the project.

A display of the human-microbe cheese at Victoria & Albert museum
The Victoria & Albert Museum

Once the celebrities' noses, armpits, and belly buttons were swabbed, their microbiome samples were used to separate milk into curds and whey. The curds were then pressed into a variety of cheeses: James's swab was used to make Cheshire cheese; Blumenthal's, comté; Professor Green's, mozzarella; Suggs's, cheddar; Tandoh's, stilton.

The cheeses are being sequenced in the lab to determine if they're safe for human consumption. But even if they don't contain any harmful bacteria, they won't be served on anyone's cheese plates. Instead. they're being kept in a refrigerated display at the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Museum-goers can catch the cheeses and the rest of the items spotlighted in FOOD: Bigger Than the Plate from now through October 20, 2019.

The Reason Why We Pour Milk Over Cereal

iStock.com/tomasworks
iStock.com/tomasworks

Sometimes, if a movie or television show wants to communicate how unusual a character is, they’ll depict them pouring a box of cereal into a bowl and then adding some kind of disgusting liquid—orange juice, water, coffee, possibly alcohol. This is an easy way to illustrate someone's eccentricity because everyone knows only milk goes in cold cereal. With no exceptions. Even warm milk, which a small number of individuals enjoy, has to be more palatable than the alternatives.

But is milk the acceptable choice for cereal because it’s the best, or because of something else? Is there a reason we don’t simply drown Frosted Flakes in water and call it a day?

The state of our cereal bowls can be traced to the origins of cereal itself. Back in the mid-1800s, Americans were enjoying very hearty breakfasts of bacon, eggs, meat, and other foods that could easily show up on their dinner plates. Many complained of gastrointestinal upset, a condition that health experts (many of them self-appointed) began to refer to as dyspepsia. This ill-defined malady was thought to be the result of consuming massive meals in the morning. Advocates argued that breakfast should be lighter and healthier, comprised of what they considered simple and easily digestible foods.

One such proselytizer was James Caleb Jackson, a vegetarian who ran a sanitarium called Our Home on the Hillside in Dansville, New York. At the time, sanitariums for health were considered retreats and a way to adopt healthier eating and exercise habits. Jackson was a follower of Reverend Sylvester Graham, the inventor of graham crackers and a man who believed the crackers could help curb sexual appetites that flamed in the meat-eating population. In the 1870s, Jackson began to market a product he called granula—graham flour that was baked, crumbled, and baked a second time. The tiny pebbles of flour were hearty and filling.

There’s some debate over whether it was Jackson or his mother, Lucretia, who actually came up with granula. In her son’s newsletters dating back to 1867, Lucretia published recipes for what amounted to the same thing. But whichever Jackson came up with it, there was a problem: Eaten dry, the granula was like trying to swallow construction rubble. In the newsletter, Lucretia cautioned that the cereal had to be soaked in milk or warm water, presumably to make it palatable. Other accounts of granula have consumers soaking it in milk overnight in order to make it chewable. People sometimes referred to it as “wheat rocks.”

Granula developed a following, but it wasn’t until another sanitarium owner named John Harvey Kellogg mimicked the recipe that it truly caught on. Kellogg, who owned the Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, offered granula for its purported health benefits but referred to it as granola to avoid any legal entanglements with Jackson. By 1889, Kellogg was selling two tons of granola a week. By 1903, more than 100 cereal companies were operating out of Battle Creek. Kellogg, of course, became famous for his far more appealing Corn Flakes (which he invented because he thought they would curb masturbation).

Even as cereal became more processed and softer, the tendency to soak it in milk never left the public consciousness. Milk was the perfect way to add moisture to the dry food without turning it into a completely soggy mess. Like cereal, milk was also synonymous with health, full of vitamins and calcium. In a 1922 newspaper ad for Corn Flakes, Kellogg’s exhorted the wonders of the combination, offering that:

“With cold milk and luscious fresh fruit, Kellogg’s are extra delightful—so crisp, and appetizing.”

One scientific study published in the Journal of Food Science in 2011 even found that the fat in milk attached itself to the surface of cereal, helping to ward off moisture and keep cereal crunchier for longer than if it were immersed in water.

Of course, milk is no longer required to soften the bricks Lucretia and John Jackson were peddling. Culturally, we’re still predisposed to keeping milk and cereal part of a two-hand breakfast option. Had Lucretia advocated for coffee, orange juice, or something else, things might have turned out differently. And much soggier.

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