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YouTube // CuriosityShow
YouTube // CuriosityShow

How to Make Your Own Sliding Puzzle

YouTube // CuriosityShow
YouTube // CuriosityShow

As a kid, I loved sliding puzzles—moving tiles around to line up rows of numbers or reassemble a photo was an excellent brain-teaser. As these games became computerized, they seemed to lose a little of their magic; sure, you can click around to "slide" the pieces, but where's the fun in that?

In this vintage clip from Curiosity Show, we learn how to make your own physical sliding puzzle at home. (Incidentally, there are also plenty of sites devoted to digital ones online.) The only problem with this clip is that it relies on a Kodak slide box to contain the puzzle...and Kodak no longer makes slide film. Plus, even if they did, you probably don't have these boxes lying around. You'll want to figure out a decent substitute "shallow, square, box-like object" depending on what you've got around. In my house, a square tissue box (cut out so just the bottom bit remains) is a reasonable option, as are many boxes from electronics (the Apple Airport Extreme comes in a very sturdy square box).

Gather the kids around, figure out what you want to turn into a slide puzzle, and enjoy:

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History
Royal Watch 1947: See Queen Elizabeth II Marry Prince Philip
AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images

In less than 24 hours, millions of royal enthusiasts will climb out of their beds at an ungodly hour, brew up the strongest pot of coffee they can manage, and watch Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle exchange their “I do”s. While gluing oneself to our personal electronics to witness all the lavish pomp and circumstance that surround a royal affair may seem like a relatively new pastime, the truth is that we’ve been doing it for years. Case in point: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip’s 1947 wedding.

Though Elizabeth and Philip didn’t have dozens of television networks broadcasting their every step down the aisle, their nuptials did manage to attract more than 200 million earlobes, who listened in on the event via BBC Radio. Shortly thereafter, newsreel footage of the soon-to-be Queen’s big day made its way into movie theaters around the world. Now, thanks to the power of the internet, we can go back in time and tune in, too.

British Pathé has made a handful of videos from the wedding, which took place on November 20, 1947, available for streaming on YouTube. So if you want to start your royal marathon a little early, here’s your chance.

If you want to go back even further in time, The Royal Family’s YouTube channel includes footage of the 1923 wedding of Elizabeth’s parents, The Duke of York (later King George VI) and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon (later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother), which also took place at Westminster Abbey.

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entertainment
How to Craft the Perfect Gag, According to Buster Keaton
Buster Keaton seen with Donald O'Connor on the set of a film in 1957
Buster Keaton seen with Donald O'Connor on the set of a film in 1957
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Dubbed “The Great Stone Face” for his ability to hold a deadpan expression even as the world (quite literally) crashed down around him, Buster Keaton was “one of the three great silent comedians” in film history, according to filmmaker Tony Zhou.

A video by Zhou, spotted by The Kid Should See This, explains just how Keaton managed to pull off such memorable stunts, and why his scenes continue to influence modern actors and filmmakers. First, Keaton shunned title cards and subtitles, instead opting to advance the story through action. He disliked repetition and thought each movement should be unique, while also insisting on authenticity and proclaiming that a filmmaker should “never fake a gag.” If a gag couldn’t be captured all in one shot, he wouldn’t do it.

The angle and positioning of the camera was also paramount. Many of Keaton’s vaudeville-esque gags were visual in nature, toying with the viewer’s perspective to create illusions that led to hilarious reveals. But for that to be successful, the camera had to remain stationary, and the joke had to play out entirely onscreen.

A low-speed chase scene in Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel, where Ralph Fiennes's Gustave H. runs up a long staircase in the background to escape cops, is a modern example of this. “Like Wes Anderson, Buster Keaton found humor in geometry,” Zhou says.

Check out Zhou’s video below.

[h/t The Kid Should See This]

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