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These Coffee Shops Will Accept Poems as Payment on World Poetry Day

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Most poets may struggle to make an actual income from their writing, but today they can at least get a free cup of coffee. In honor of World Poetry Day on March 21, an international chain of cafés will be offering its patrons coffee in exchange for poems, The Guardian reports.

The Austrian coffee-roasting company Julius Meinl first launched their Pay With a Poem initiative in 2013. Last year, more than 100,000 customers took part and today 1280 locations will be accepting poems as payment in 34 countries, including Australia, Canada, China, England, and the U.S. Poems collected from coffee shops that day will later be put on display as part of an art installation in London.

The coffee chain's passion for poetry is something it celebrates throughout the year. Shops will often host various poetry events, and in 2013 a robot was set up in their Bucharest location to transcribe poems in real-time as people wrote them online. To see if a café near you is accepting poems as currency today, you can check out their map of participating stores.

[h/t The Guardian]

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Food
Drink Your Coffee Out of a Cup Made From Coffee Waste
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Your coffee habit isn’t exactly good for the environment. For one thing, 30 to 50 percent of the original coffee plant harvested (by weight) ends up as agricultural waste, and there aren’t many uses for coffee husks and pulp. While coffee pulp can be made into flour, and in Ethiopia husks are used to brew a type of coffee called bruno, typically most of the byproducts of your morning coffee go to waste.

Huskee has another use for coffee husks. The company makes stylish coffee cups, returning coffee back to its original home inside the husk, in a sense. The dishwasher-friendly and microwavable cups are made of husks from coffee farms in Yunnan, China. The material won’t burn your hands, but it keeps your coffee warm as well as a ceramic mug would.

A stack of black cups and saucers of various sizes on an espresso machine.
HuskeeCup

Designed for both home and restaurant use, the cups come in 6-ounce, 8-ounce, and 12-ounce sizes with saucers. The company is also working on a lid so that the cups can be used on the go.

Huskee estimates that a single coffee drinker is responsible for around 6.6 pounds of husk waste per year, which doesn’t sound like much until you begin to consider how many coffee lovers there are in the world. That’s somewhere around 1.49 million tons per year, according to the company. Though coffee husks are sometimes used for animal feed, we could use a few more ways to recycle them. And if it happens to be in the form of an attractive coffee mug, so be it.

A four-pack of cups is about $37 on Kickstarter. The product is scheduled to ship before February 2018.

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science
The Brain Chemistry Behind Your Caffeine Boost
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Whether it’s consumed as coffee, candy, or toothpaste, caffeine is the world’s most popular drug. If you’ve ever wondered how a shot of espresso can make your groggy head feel alert and ready for the day, TED-Ed has the answer.

Caffeine works by hijacking receptors in the brain. The stimulant is nearly the same size and shape as adenosine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter that slows down neural activity. Adenosine builds up as the day goes on, making us feel more tired as the day progresses. When caffeine enters your system, it falls into the receptors meant to catch adenosine, thus keeping you from feeling as sleepy as you would otherwise. The blocked adenosine receptors also leave room for the mood-boosting compound dopamine to settle into its receptors. Those increased dopamine levels lead to the boost in energy and mood you feel after finishing your morning coffee.

For a closer look at how this process works, check out the video below.

[h/t TED-Ed]

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