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Here’s What Happens When You Use a Bean-Riddled Massage Bar in the Shower

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Twitter // @hannahhallpetry

Here’s a reminder to read the labels on your beauty products: last summer, a number of people apparently mistook a Lush massage bar for soap and used it in the shower or sink. Then, as Buzzfeed reports, this happened:

That’s Lush’s “Wiccy Magic Muscles” massage bar, which just so happens to be filled with viable adzuki beans. The hard little beans in this “spicy massage bar,” as Lush describes it, are intended to “work into the muscles like firm fingertips.” Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your opinion on shower beans), they also work their way into drains.

When asked for comment, Lush co-founder Helen Ambrosen told Buzzfeed the bathroom sprouts “…just go to show how fresh the ingredients really are.” 

You might be more familiar with these beans than you realize. The adzuki bean (also known as Vigna angularis, the red bean, azuki bean, and aduki bean) is the same bean that appears in many, many, many Asian desserts. Ever had red bean ice cream, Chinese sticky rice cake, or bean paste mochi? You’ve eaten adzuki beans (although the ones you ate were almost definitely not bathed in somebody else’s skin cells and used soap). 

How does something like this happen? Well, beans love moisture, and they also love being left alone. Even dried beans are viable for a long time (up to three years), and can be sprouted with very little effort. The sprouts themselves are nutritious, and make a great addition to salads and sandwiches. 

If you’d like to sprout your own, you can do it the roundabout way—that is, buying and misusing a massage bar—or the easy way, by dropping a few beans and some water into a jar.  

[h/t Buzzfeed] 

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iStock
ATM Fees Reach a New Record High
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iStock

You have good reason to flinch every time you withdraw cash from an out-of-network ATM. The cash machine operator and the bank each hit you with a separate fee for these withdrawals, and both types set record highs this year, according to a new Bankrate survey.

In Phoenix and Atlanta, grabbing cash from an out-of-network ATM will set you back more than $5. But even the cheapest metro area isn’t actually much less expensive: In San Francisco, the average fees are now $3.90. “The national average is $4.57, which means stopping at an out-of-network ATM for $20 will cost nearly 23 percent in fees,” says Greg McBride, CFA, Bankrate's senior vice president and chief financial analyst.

To skirt the fees, stay in network. Virtually any bank will let you withdraw money from its own ATMs, of course. But if you want easy, low-cost access to more cash machines, ask your bank if they participate in a larger ATM network. Some do, to provide their customers with more widespread access.

While ATM fees climbed higher in 2016, one type of bank fee actually broke its 17-year streak of increases: overdraft fees. The average is now $33.07 (yikes!), but that's 0.1 percent below last year’s average. It’s probably too soon to celebrate the downward trend, says McBride. Overdraft fee increases still outnumbered decreases by 5 to 1 in the national survey.

McBride’s best advice for avoiding the hefty penalty? “Sign up for email and text alerts that let you know when your balance is getting low, so you can proactively move money into the account,” he says. “And keep tabs on your available account balance through online and mobile banking—particularly before initiating transactions.”

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Which State Has the Most Millennials Still Living at Home?
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Escaping your parents’ home doesn’t seem to have quite the same urgency it once did. According to Time, recent Census data indicates that a substantial number of Millennials—typically considered to be those 18 to 34 years of age—are choosing to remain in their childhood residences, with one state in particular crowding out the rest.

The winner? New Jersey, which has just under 47 percent of that demographic living at home. Eastern state neighbors New York and Connecticut each have roughly 40 percent choosing to stay in the nest, a significant spike from the national average of around 33 percent. That’s up from 23 percent in 2000. (The state with the lowest percentage of Millennials rooming with their 'rents? North Dakota, with just 14.1 percent.)

It can be difficult to extrapolate why some states have more clingy kids than others. The price of real estate might be one explanation (rent is much more expensive in New Jersey and New York than it is out West); the trend of Millennials getting married later in life might be another. Without the need for their own mortgage, utility bills, and consumer spending, it’s possible that the homebodies may even be contributing to an economic downturn.

Then again, who can resist free laundry? “There’s the comfort of someone to help you out at all times,” college student Irsia Khan told USAToday.com in June 2016. “Having your meals ready and your laundry done for you takes the load off on the rest of the things you go through in college.”

[h/t Time]

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